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Old Jan 27, 2009, 06:09 PM
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Not sure of what the warhead was designed to like that we just knew that if it went off under two fully loaded Sprucans it would be really unpleasant, plus another fully loaded on the opposite side of the pier. Courage is defined as the intersection of luck, skill, timing, and fortune.
We got lucky, five minutes later and Hewitt's crew might have put foam on it, if we hadn't had the HAZMAT training that day led by a TM we might have been helping them, and half an hour earlier and they would have been dropping that fish in the middle of pier when all the Marines from Tarawa, and the tender were leaving for liberty! Thinking on it our supply dept had a pickup parked in front of Hewitt's torpedo launcher earlier that afternoon. Any of those things would have made an awful situation infinitely worse.....
Foo
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Old Jan 27, 2009, 11:31 PM
NeverAgainVolunteerYourse lf
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Australia, QLD, Regents Park
Joined Mar 2007
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A FFG, (O.H.Perry class built in Australia) was exercising of Sydney, one of the tasks was to use the CIWS
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_CIWS
to shoot out a target towed by a Learjet. The exercise was going well, maybe a little too well.

The CIWS destroyed the target but continued to fire, Its stream of 3000 rpm was getting close to the Learjet, it took an Able Seaman to realise the CIWS radar was tracking the gun up the 12mm diameter cable attached to the jet and would soon be firing at the jet itself. Well he did the first thing that came to mind and pulled the breaker to the whole system shutting it down.

The Learjet crew were more than thankful and I believe the sailor received an award for his efforts
I think there was only 500 meters of cable left out of a 2000 meter original length.

We call the FFG's FAG boats because in the early days when the ships numbering included the FFG bit some enterprising sailor from a DDG painted a stripe on the back of the second F. Im not sure if the DDG's
(Charles F Adams class) got their "Don't Do Girl's" before or after that incident.


Nick
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Old Jan 28, 2009, 04:13 AM
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CIWS nicknames and Motto

The CIWS (Close In Weapons System) or Vulcan Phalanx system was really starting to hit the U.S. fleet when I was active. There was in fact a shortage of mounts for the fleet because they were being installed on all the new construction ships. It consists of a self contained radar and fire control system with a 20mm rotary cannon, turn it on and it does what it is supposed to, kill anything that flies.
The Ratheon people (who make the radar and fire control system) used to pass out T-shirts to the gunners who worked on them with the slogan; "If it flies it dies" in reference to the fact that CIWS does not have any Identification Friend or Foe.
Gunners also used to refer to it as R2D2 with a hardon.
One of the first ships with it installed was Ticonderoga (CG-47) and when she arrived in Norfolk both her CIWS were acting a little crazy. They had her tied up to the carrier pier (which is under the approach path for Norfolk airport) and one mount appearently turned itself on (it was discovered to have a short in the power relay later) and locked up, tracked and tried to kill an incoming, landing, 747, fortunately they had had the problem for a little while and had unloaded the gun. Her other mount would just go spastic and sit there and twitch randomly. The fire control techs were mystified, Ratheon was mystified finally one of the ships missile fire control guys figured it out. Tico had just come around to Norfolk from San Diego and after a prolonged at sea period the dome of the CIWS was looking a little raggedy, so they went down to the paint locker and got a can of Formula 151 primer (also know as white lead primer), they then spot painted the ugly spots on the dome and the Phalanx was trying to tread the metal (lead) in the paint!
Foo
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Old Jan 28, 2009, 04:24 AM
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Destroyer Deck Division Motto;
We the Unwilling,
Led by the Uncaring,
Have been Doing the Impossible,
For the Ungrateful
For so long,
With so little,
That we are now qualified,
To Do Anything,
With Nothing,
In No Time At All!
Foo
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Old Jan 28, 2009, 11:21 AM
Naval gazing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fooman2008
Destroyer Deck Division Motto;
We the Unwilling,
Led by the Uncaring,
Have been Doing the Impossible,
For the Ungrateful
For so long,
That we are now qualified,
To Do Anything,
With Nothing,
In No Time At All!
Foo
This made my day!
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Old Jan 29, 2009, 06:43 PM
KC8WPF
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Joined Sep 2004
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The John Liberty story reminded me of a couple of guys I sailed with.

Aboard USCGC CONFIDENCE, we had a Machinery Technician with a perfect name for the engine room - Jimmy Cummins. MK3 Cummins was assigned to A-gang, which was responsible for the GMC engines in the small boats and the Cummins powered gensets.

Aboard CGC VIGOROUS, we had a Seaman J. Samples. He was pretty good about the teasing he got. SN Samples had an injury and didn't go on a fishery patrol with us. We were at the mouth of the Thames River and got diverted on SAR (Search & Rescue) case, and were delyed getting home. Some of the crew's wives were waiting at the pier with SN Samples, when they were informed of our change in schedule. Some of the wives decided to a local restaurant for some coffee and breakfast, and they were nice enough to take SN Samples with them. A few weeks late, the ship''s ombudsman sent out a newsletter, and one of the stories had the following title: VIGOROUS Wives collect Seaman Samples on Street Corner." On our next patrol, copies of that newsletter showed up all around the ship.
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Old Jan 29, 2009, 08:04 PM
Retired for now
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I love reading these storys but I'll be damned if I can figure out how we won the big war with all this going on in the Navy. Sounds like some crews are more dangerous to us than to the enemy. Ha! Pete
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Old Jan 29, 2009, 10:13 PM
Naval gazing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norgale
I love reading these storys but I'll be damned if I can figure out how we won the big war with all this going on in the Navy. Sounds like some crews are more dangerous to us than to the enemy. Ha! Pete

There have been many cold war era mishaps involving nuclear weapons:

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2007...oops-list.html

"The Russians have also had their own share of nuclear mishaps, and while we havenít heard about most of them, the ones we HAVE heard of it are enough to make you pack your dehydrated beans and go live up in the hills. For instance, in 1986 a Soviet Yankee class nuclear sub sort of .... well, sank some 600 miles from Bermuda. In addition to its own nuke power plant, this fine example of Russian engineering was also carrying a few thermonuclear weapons ... 34 of them to be exact."
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Old Jan 30, 2009, 03:25 AM
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My dad was ComSeaBear (Commander of all naval Antisubmarine Warfare Aircraft) on the East coast when that happened! If it was navy and could get in the air it was there until it finally sank (or was sunk). There are two P-3 Orion bases on the East Coast (New Brunswick Maine, and Jacksonville Florida) and when the Yankee started to have problems (fortunately just out of range of the fighters in Cuba) every P-3 on the east coast headed for Fla.. They started in Key West and as she drifted North they moved with her something 50 Orions along with the S-3's from the carriers, even the H-3 Seakings, and SH-60 SeaHawks if they could get close enough. Was quite a show of Naval Air Power and the maintainers flogging themselves to keep the airplanes in the air for something like two weeks straight. The Line Chief at NAS Jacksonville says that over the course of that time his guys refueled and maintained the equivalent of every P-3 in the Navy inventory.
Supposedly Tom Clancy got the Idea for 'Hunt for Red October' from that incident.
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Old Jan 30, 2009, 03:26 AM
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Norgale,
We didn't win the cold war we just didn't loose it as fast as the other guys!
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Old Jan 30, 2009, 06:19 AM
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I'm not talking about the cold war although I can see why you youngsters would think of that. I was refering to WWll where the Navy and everybody else actually got to shot at something.
I think the mishaps reiterated here would rapidly dissapear once the real shootin' started and are most likely the results of boredom on board ships.
I just can't see why any sane man would sign up for even one month at sea on any ship with nothing to do out there but float around and shoot at decoys. Geez! Gimme airplanes on the bank anytime. Pete (SP-5 heli mech)
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Old Jan 30, 2009, 10:06 AM
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I was off the coast of Lebanon when the Marine Barracks got hit (killed 236 Marines and 18 Navy), we were waiting for the for the Marine FDC (fire direction center) to come up on the radio to tell us what to shoot at when someone drove a dump truck full of high explosives into the building. The first intelligent radio message was that helo's were incoming and take all the casualties to Ricketts (DDG-5) us, and stop on the way back and get machine gun ammo from the Tarawa. We were a little concerned since a Charles F. Adams class has two hospital beds, no landing pad, and only an independent duty corpsman (our was a really good one). Turns out the radio operator got the message transposed and they were supposed to get ammo from us.
The interesting thing was that nothing absolutely nothing broke down for two days, if something so much as hiccuped someone was there to fix it. We got told to peal off and get fuel and the skipper told the Chief Engineer to get us there in a hurry and according to the pit log (speedo) we were doing something over 31 knots (with a dirty bottom and after 4 months away from home port).
Foo
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Old Jan 30, 2009, 10:37 AM
Naval gazing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norgale
I'm not talking about the cold war although I can see why you youngsters would think of that. I was refering to WWll where the Navy and everybody else actually got to shot at something.
I think the mishaps reiterated here would rapidly dissapear once the real shootin' started and are most likely the results of boredom on board ships.
I just can't see why any sane man would sign up for even one month at sea on any ship with nothing to do out there but float around and shoot at decoys. Geez! Gimme airplanes on the bank anytime. Pete (SP-5 heli mech)
True 'nuff. I recall there was at least one episode of Unsolved Mysteries back in the 90's that had to do with sketchy things going on in the American navy in the Pacific theatre, like some crewmen on a Fletcher had reason to believe the skipper had them sink an american sub deliberately.

I wouldnt be surprised if the enemy navies had some wacky stories too.
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Old Jan 31, 2009, 03:59 AM
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You seen my airplane?

i am a Navy brat, and in the late 70's we were stationed at NAS (Naval Air Station) Alameda, CA.
A group of accountants came aboard the base for a big audit (I think they were OMB (Office of Management and Budget) but I am not sure). They counted everything on base like usual; bombs, beans, ball point pens, carbon paper, all the things that matter to a number cruncher. The base was within allowances but for one major item, they were short one A-4m Skyhawk! When they pulled the log book for the aircraft they found out the last person assigned the aircraft was the CO of the base.
This of course aroused suspicions and the NIS (Naval Investigative Service, now succeeded by NCIS) was called, they tore the base apart looking for the aircraft. They questioned the captain (whose orders were up but they would not let him transfer) and he said he knew nothing about a Skyhawk and wasn't even qualified on one. The had people shining flash lights into the overheads of the hangars looking for the A-4. They grounded every A-4 in Pacific Fleet looking for it. When they found out that VMFA-214 (the Black Sheep) flew the Skyhawk they ground them and removed the paint from the tails of their aircraft trying to see if they had stolen it and repainted it. They even inquired overseas (Israel and Kuwait) whether someone had come up with an 'extra' A-4, nothing! Finally after three weeks of this they let the CO move to his next station.
The new Captain reported aboard the station and his teenage son was driving mom's station wagon with the aerosol cans,and stuff that the mover can't take in the van, as he entered the main gate of the station he observed two guys in a cherry picker painting his dad's name on a Skyhawk on a concrete pylon 15 feet in the air! Cool!
The ultimate irony is the base paper had a pic of the two senior NIS agents reporting to the Captain that they had no idea where the missing aircraft was. The picture, taken over their shoulders, looking at the CO's desk showed the aircraft in question out the window in the backround!
It turns out that the CO of Alameda signs for the china in the CO's house, the wall to wall carpeting, the staff car, and some Navy provided furnishings, amongst the several dozen things he signed for was the Skyhawk. No one had ever bothered to mention in the paper work that the aircraft was unflyable and was on a concrete pylon just inside the gate!
Foo
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Old Feb 01, 2009, 03:20 AM
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Tales of Helo's

Getting ready for my last cruise we were informed that we would be out on picket duty a lot and would be given one of the two helo detachments for the four DD's of battle group Charlie for the upcoming cruise. So we started working up with the helo, a newly upgraded LAMPS I(Light Airborne MultiPupose System) SH-2F. We would go out for a couple of days and the helo would come aboard and we were supposed to practice using its equipment and moving it etc.. This was a great idea except the damned helo would never work right, we would start it and about 15 minutes in flight and the chip light (a device to detect metal shaving in the transmission oil) would come on. Every ship has a lab to check oil in the engine room and we would pull a sample and they would check it out....NOTHING!
The chip light coming on is considered an in-flight emergency and we would have to scramble into emergency flight quarters to get them aboard. We would finish up checking oil, pump more fuel into it and launch it again, 20 minutes later on goes the chip light.
We even ran an entire tank of fuel through it one morning with it chained to the deck, nothing. Put it in the air and 20 minutes later guess what happened?
After about three weeks of this we got to the point that instead of changing the helo's call sign every day we just started calling her "chip Light 612" (the last three of the tail no.), most of the time the flight deck crew and those assigned to the motor whale boat (in case of a crash into the water) would just find a place and catch forty winks since we knew we going to go back to emergency flight quarters in less than half an hour.
For more than a month then finally the CO got pissed and sent the helo back to North Island to have it worked on. We went to the tender and got done with our availability (boy did we need it), along with a small refit to allow us to put an H-3 SeaKing in the Hangar (required moving about half the light fixtures in the hangar allow the tail in).
We were again back to our schedule of out Tuesday morning in on Friday morning getting ready for cruise, just after securing from sea and anchor detail stations. The after lookout reported (who was very inexperienced reported a helo lifting off from North Island (Naval Air Station), he shouldn't have even reported it. It flew around for a about half an hour and then stridently reported that the chip light had just come on. Now the carrier was out, two twin cans were out and they were less than 10 miles from 25 square miles of concrete runways and a good crash crew, guess who got to emergency flight quarters first and told they had a ready deck? We were bringing them in and they were about 200 yards out and about 200 feet up when the main rotor stopped
They hit the water hard, the aircraft rolled to the pilots side (he and the co pilot and the systems operator all had their doors open) and she sank in less than 15 seconds. I was on the boat crew that day and we had the davit lowering the boat before she even started to sink. They were in the water for less than 2 minutes before we had then in the boat.
We pulled the log book for the aircraft and it was a year older than the buy driving it! It had been built as an H2-B, with one engine a four rotor blades, and crashed as an SH-2F, with five main rotor blades and two engines now. It was old enough to vote!
The Navy wanted to recover the aircraft but just due to providence (otherwise they might have tried to salvage some parts from that piece of junk) it was right on the edge of the Scripps Trench (about 2500 feet deep) and they couldn't justify the money to go get it.
As a consolation prize they let us play with one of the first two operational SH-60B SeaHawks for a week. Then informed us that we were 'not senior enough' for a detachment and took it away so we had no helo for half the cruise (but that is a story for later....)
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