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Old Dec 28, 2008, 11:20 PM
CURIOSITY Has Landed!
Fugitive_Bill's Avatar
Sydney, Australia
Joined Jul 2005
1,170 Posts
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Maiden Flight Check List / Flight Plan

Hey,

Has anyone ever made a MAIDEN FLIGHT PLAN?

Here's my one. I'd like to see one by someone who knows what they are actally talking about!


MAIDEN FLIGHT PLAN
------------------

1. Preflight check - Battery charged, Controls full free and correct, Range check, Full throttle check and Roll Camera.

2. Take off - Gear down, flaps up, rolling take off from tarmac (the road!)

3. Spotter to call following flight plan for pilot and cameraman and to adjust trims as requested by test pilot.

3b. If plane is now not in a million pieces, proceed to step 4!

4. Mid power left hand circuit (gear still down - then retract)

5. Low level full speed fly-by for dopler recording.

6. Single slowish aileron rolls in both directions and then snap rolls.

7. Fly inverted upwind and downwind for length of airfield.

8. Inside loop.

9. Split 'S'.

10. High Alfa, full power stall, zero power stall (and combo's of flaps and gear up/down)

11. Vertical climb - until it 'falls over'.

12. Flat spin. (from height - Full power, full up elevator, full Aileron, Full rudder)

13. Flyby - flaps down, gear up.

14. flyby - flaps up, gear down.

15. Flyby - flaps down, gear down.

16. Landing - Slow circuit and land on tarmac if not possible, gear up grass landing.

BILL!
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Old Dec 29, 2008, 12:07 AM
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VectorII's Avatar
Joined Dec 2008
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I always do a maiden check list.

1. Bring airplane.
2. Fly airplane.
3. Go home with airplane.
4. Repeat next day.
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Old Dec 29, 2008, 01:20 AM
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Joined Jun 2002
860 Posts
Being a tad more cautious, my maiden flight plan might look more like this;
1. Range check, CG check
2. final check for elevator and aileron direction of travel
3.Build up plenty of speed before a gradual lift off.
4.Airplane may want to climb at a steep angle, don't let it.
5.Keep climbing gradually, make shallow turns until the airplane is 2 or 3 mistakes high.
6.At a comfortably high altitude, throttle back and set your elevator and aileron trims, set elevator for a gentle glide.
7.Do a few circuits while you feel out the airplanes stall characteristics.
8.Practice a few landing approaches, but do them a hundred feet up, instead of on the deck.
9. Land the airplane. Relax. The next flight will be much better.
10. For the maiden flight, make sure your airplane is fully visible. Do not fly on an overcast day, put some large geometric patches on your airplane so it is obvious which way is which.

Ron
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Last edited by Ron Pogue; Dec 29, 2008 at 02:37 AM. Reason: Include visibility criteria
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Old Dec 29, 2008, 01:56 AM
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Adrianh's Avatar
Chatteris, Cambs, UK
Joined Dec 2005
711 Posts
I would go more for Ron's checklist. Get the first flight up and down safely. Check the aircraft carefully for any loose parts or impending failures. Then progressively increase the severity of the manoeuvres, checking the aircraft after each flight, especially before any high speed flat out down the runway.

Things that can bite are: C/G out of place, control surface flutter, loosening hinges, clevices failing, vibration causing screws to loosen. U/C being jarred during takeoff and failing to retract fully/ stressing the mountings. to name but a few.

Adrian
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Old Dec 29, 2008, 03:02 PM
dare to be dull
bigjohn's Avatar
Deland, FL
Joined Jun 2002
714 Posts
Ron has it. The objective of the first flight is to find out if it will go up and come back down. Once it is up, the primary thing is to get it (and the pilot) ready to come back down. Slow flight, check for tip stall or pitch up, setting the trim, and landing. Multiple approaches may be needed to get it worked out well, no need to wait - start doing them as soon as you have a lap around the field. Start up high, then down to the ground.


If you get the landing real comfortable on the first attempt, you can allways go play with the plane after that. If you go play and then leave yourself one chance to land with any new plane, results will likely disappoint.

BTW - Bill's list is good, it's just about 3-4 flights worth of stuff.
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Old Dec 29, 2008, 03:15 PM
dare to be dull
bigjohn's Avatar
Deland, FL
Joined Jun 2002
714 Posts
One first flight tip I can give, for futaba anyway:

The newer futaba transmitters have a slider switch on each side of the tx case where your index finger can get to it easy. I always take this switch and mix it to elevator with a 5-10% mix. That gives me immediate "elevator trim" control incase the plane is unexpectedly out of trim - or you need a largely different trim setting for landing. If the plane pitches up, you can slam in a bunch of down trim right away with this method.
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 07:11 PM
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Tehachapi CA
Joined Sep 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigjohn
One first flight tip I can give, for futaba anyway:

The newer futaba transmitters have a slider switch on each side of the tx case where your index finger can get to it easy. I always take this switch and mix it to elevator with a 5-10% mix. That gives me immediate "elevator trim" control incase the plane is unexpectedly out of trim - or you need a largely different trim setting for landing. If the plane pitches up, you can slam in a bunch of down trim right away with this method.
Nice tip! I will try that on my JR 9303 . thanks
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Old Aug 27, 2014, 12:45 PM
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United States, NY, New York
Joined Sep 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VectorII View Post
I always do a maiden check list.

1. Bring airplane.
2. Fly airplane.
3. Go home with airplane.
4. Repeat next day.
kkkkkkkkkk good this is my way kkkkkkkkk
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Old Aug 30, 2014, 10:04 AM
Hey Guys, Watch This.......
mike2663's Avatar
USA, TX, El Paso
Joined Dec 2003
6,196 Posts
G. Milers maiden advise.

"Time for a first flight

Through 55 years of flying model aircraft, if there is anything I have done more than most, it is test fly new model aircraft. It is my specialty. Considering most of the aircraft I have built through the years were all my own designs or scratch built scale aircraft.(I think I have only built about ten kits in my whole career and do not own any ARFs.) I have also had to train other test pilots and have other pilots test fly for me. When doing movie work, I was often too busy working with the directors and producers in meetings to do everything myself.

Here are some of the things I would tell my pilots and do myself.

You must have the right mind set for test flying. Be expecting something to go wrong so you won't have to change your thinking when something happens. Very important here. Many think they can make anything fly and it is a big surprise to them when it doesn't or something goes wrong. By the time they have got out of that mind set and into realizing the aircraft and they are in trouble, it is in the ground.

Try to find a reason not to fly the aircraft. No matter how small or simple it is, if you can find any excuse not to fly the aircraft, don't fly it. If you can't find any reason at all, it is time to fly it.

Set all controls at high rate.

If anything goes wrong on the take-off roll, ABORT the flight. I have seen many first flights where the aircraft did not steer straight down the runway and the pilot thought he was good enough to get the aircraft up in the air before it ran off the side of the runway. Thinking you are good enough to overcome something that is wrong is a big mistake. You are not thinking of the aircraft which is what you should be doing. The aircraft may not rotate and leave the runway when you think it should. It may need more runway for various reasons including being out of trim.

After rotation, fly the aircraft. Never mind it is is out of trim and you are having to hold a control. Just fly the aircraft. And get some altitude. I have seen modelers rotate a new aircraft on take-off, have it out of trim, reach for trim tabs, and wind up with the aircraft right back on the ground in pieces.

I recommend you have another pilot with you who knows your radio. You may find that this large investment you have here will make you more nervous than you think and you can have him reach over to move trims why you just concentrate on keeping it in the air. (I always do this on first flights.)

As soon as you have the aircraft trimmed out, test your travels to see if you have any one too extreme. If so, go to low rate.

Now it is time to land. Do not fly around. Get some altitude and go through your landing "

This is the best I've come across.

Mike
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