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Old Aug 09, 2008, 12:02 PM
SB11
Guest
n/a Posts
New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard earned
cash in machinery
It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas, but with
some very significant damp patches.
I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.
I have done some research on the web, which has not been very conclusive.
Most coating systems I have seen say don't apply if there is any damp
present
Does anyone out there have any experience of dealing with a similar
situation?
Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated for a cost effective method
of sealing the floor.

Regards

Stuart

Old Aug 09, 2008, 12:33 PM
Dave Baker
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought


"SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:qsmdnb8ZY7QKUADVnZ2dnUVZ8qbinZ2d@bt.com...
>I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
> I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard earned
> cash in machinery
> It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas, but
> with some very significant damp patches.
> I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.
> I have done some research on the web, which has not been very conclusive.
> Most coating systems I have seen say don't apply if there is any damp
> present
> Does anyone out there have any experience of dealing with a similar
> situation?
> Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated for a cost effective
> method of sealing the floor.
>
> Regards
>
> Stuart


You might do better to ask on uk.d-i-y. Not wishing to decry the knowledge
of people on here about concrete floors of course.
--
Dave Baker


Old Aug 09, 2008, 12:50 PM
Andrew Mawson
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought


"SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:qsmdnb8ZY7QKUADVnZ2dnUVZ8qbinZ2d@bt.com...
> I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
> I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard

earned
> cash in machinery
> It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas,

but with
> some very significant damp patches.
> I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.
> I have done some research on the web, which has not been very

conclusive.
> Most coating systems I have seen say don't apply if there is any

damp
> present
> Does anyone out there have any experience of dealing with a similar
> situation?
> Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated for a cost

effective method
> of sealing the floor.
>
> Regards
>
> Stuart
>


Only really effective solution is to Kango it up and re-lay it
incorporating a membrane. If the cracked bits seem stable and not
moving relative to each other you may get away with an epoxy patching
cement then epoxy floor paint, but it'll probably crack again I'm
afraid.

I've just finished jack hammering out 1200 sq foot of cracked uneven
floor in my new workshop, and I've re-layed a 6" slab of RC45 concrete
with fibres incorporated, as well as 6mm reinforcing mesh all floating
on 50 mm of polystyrene - obviously also with a dpc membrane.
Needless to say a messy, time consuming and expensive process. I'll be
p****d off if that gets damp or cracks !!!!

AWEM



Old Aug 09, 2008, 01:35 PM
John S
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

Watch where you store the kippers then.............

John S.
Old Aug 09, 2008, 02:14 PM
Tim Leech
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

On Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:50:56 +0100, "Andrew Mawson"
<andrew@no_spam_please_mawson.org.uk> wrote:

>
>"SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
>news:qsmdnb8ZY7QKUADVnZ2dnUVZ8qbinZ2d@bt.com...
>> I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
>> I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard

>earned
>> cash in machinery
>> It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas,

>but with
>> some very significant damp patches.
>> I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.
>> I have done some research on the web, which has not been very

>conclusive.
>> Most coating systems I have seen say don't apply if there is any

>damp
>> present
>> Does anyone out there have any experience of dealing with a similar
>> situation?
>> Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated for a cost

>effective method
>> of sealing the floor.
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> Stuart
>>

>
>Only really effective solution is to Kango it up and re-lay it
>incorporating a membrane. If the cracked bits seem stable and not
>moving relative to each other you may get away with an epoxy patching
>cement then epoxy floor paint, but it'll probably crack again I'm
>afraid.
>
>I've just finished jack hammering out 1200 sq foot of cracked uneven
>floor in my new workshop, and I've re-layed a 6" slab of RC45 concrete
>with fibres incorporated, as well as 6mm reinforcing mesh all floating
>on 50 mm of polystyrene - obviously also with a dpc membrane.
>Needless to say a messy, time consuming and expensive process. I'll be
>p****d off if that gets damp or cracks !!!!
>
>AWEM
>


I didn't see any mention of cracks.
Before adopting Andrew's extreme cure, you could try a couple of coats
of diluted PVA glue. If nothing else it'll seal the dust to a degree,
and if the 'damp' patches are only damp and not wet, it might help
there.
Cheap & cheerful but no guarantees.

Tim
Old Aug 09, 2008, 02:47 PM
bigegg
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

Tim Leech wrote:
> On Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:50:56 +0100, "Andrew Mawson"
> <andrew@no_spam_please_mawson.org.uk> wrote:
>
>> "SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
>> news:qsmdnb8ZY7QKUADVnZ2dnUVZ8qbinZ2d@bt.com...
>>> I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
>>> I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard

>> earned
>>> cash in machinery
>>> It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas,

>> but with
>>> some very significant damp patches.
>>> I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.


> you could try a couple of coats
> of diluted PVA glue. If nothing else it'll seal the dust to a degree,
> and if the 'damp' patches are only damp and not wet, it might help
> there.


if it needs more, can I suggest laying a DPC over the existing floor
then pouring a 2-4inch layer of concrete over the top, perhaps
reinforced with some chicken wire.

If there is a "significant" amount of damp, then anything less
substantial is likely to be lifted by the water


--
BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
http://www.workshop-projects.com -
Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
Old Aug 10, 2008, 01:25 AM
Registered User
Surrey, UK
Joined Mar 2008
80 Posts
I've used Watco products a few times, they do one that can go onto damp surfaces but I've not used that particular one. Worth giving them a call to see what they suggest.

http://www.watco.co.uk/asp/autopage....=DSH&Group=FPC

Jason
jasonballamy is offline Find More Posts by jasonballamy
Old Aug 10, 2008, 03:39 AM
pentagrid@yahoo.com
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

On Sat, 09 Aug 2008 20:47:21 +0100, bigegg
<news@hardboiled.plus.com> wrote:

>Tim Leech wrote:
>> On Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:50:56 +0100, "Andrew Mawson"
>> <andrew@no_spam_please_mawson.org.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> "SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
>>> news:qsmdnb8ZY7QKUADVnZ2dnUVZ8qbinZ2d@bt.com...
>>>> I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
>>>> I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard
>>> earned
>>>> cash in machinery
>>>> It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas,
>>> but with
>>>> some very significant damp patches.
>>>> I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.

>
>> you could try a couple of coats
>> of diluted PVA glue. If nothing else it'll seal the dust to a degree,
>> and if the 'damp' patches are only damp and not wet, it might help
>> there.

>
>if it needs more, can I suggest laying a DPC over the existing floor
>then pouring a 2-4inch layer of concrete over the top, perhaps
>reinforced with some chicken wire.
>
>If there is a "significant" amount of damp, then anything less
>substantial is likely to be lifted by the water

th a

With a similar problem a long time ago I tried a couple
of coats of propriety sealant with very limited success.

In the end I bit the bullet and covered the whole floor with
the thick grade of PVC floor covering.

This is a very pleasant surface to walk on and, while
damp accumulates under the PVC it doesn't seem to get through to
the workshop.

This sort of surface is worth preserving so areas close
to the lathe and mill are either covered with duckboards or
multihole mats. Stray chips fall through the holes and don't get
trodden in.

Jim



Old Aug 10, 2008, 04:18 AM
Norman Billingham
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought


"bigegg" <news@hardboiled.plus.com> wrote in message
news:kfudnZmcCpVNbgDVnZ2dneKdnZydnZ2d@posted.plusn et...
> Tim Leech wrote:
>> On Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:50:56 +0100, "Andrew Mawson"
>> <andrew@no_spam_please_mawson.org.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> "SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
>>> news:qsmdnb8ZY7QKUADVnZ2dnUVZ8qbinZ2d@bt.com...
>>>> I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
>>>> I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard
>>> earned
>>>> cash in machinery
>>>> It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas,
>>> but with
>>>> some very significant damp patches.
>>>> I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.

>
>> you could try a couple of coats
>> of diluted PVA glue. If nothing else it'll seal the dust to a degree,
>> and if the 'damp' patches are only damp and not wet, it might help
>> there.

>
> if it needs more, can I suggest laying a DPC over the existing floor
> then pouring a 2-4inch layer of concrete over the top, perhaps
> reinforced with some chicken wire.
>
> If there is a "significant" amount of damp, then anything less substantial
> is likely to be lifted by the water



Its difficult to advise without knowing what "significant" damp patches
means, how much you want or are able to spend and what scale of machinery
you are using.

One suggestion, would be to cover the existing floor with a standard
polyethylene DPM then lay 1" thick expanded polystyrene sheet over the top
and "float" standard T&G chipboard flooring on top of that. You have to be
careful with the EPS sheet whilst laying it - don't walk on it - but once
the floor is on top it will take any amount of load, is easy on the feet and
doesn't automatically chip any tool dropped on it. You can get EPS sheet in
8' x 4' sizes.

Of course that supposes you are not using the kind of machinery which needs
bolting to the floor, I run a Myford 7 and a VMC mill on an EPS supported
floor with no problem at all.


Old Aug 10, 2008, 05:14 AM
Chris Edwards
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

On Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:02:13 +0100, "SB11" <st.br@btopenworld.com> wrote:

>I am setting up a new workshop in my garage.
>I need to address the state of the floor, before investing my hard earned
>cash in machinery
>It is 40+ year old concrete, which is dry and dusty in some areas, but with
>some very significant damp patches.
>I suspect it was laid without any damp proofing.
>I have done some research on the web, which has not been very conclusive.
>Most coating systems I have seen say don't apply if there is any damp
>present
>Does anyone out there have any experience of dealing with a similar
>situation?
>Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated for a cost effective method
>of sealing the floor.
>
>Regards
>
>Stuart


Yes, there are epoxy resins produced for this specific purpose. Not
expensive, I have waterproofed the whole ground floor area of a sixteenth
century house, where it was not practicable to damproof any other way.

Speak to somebody like Rotafix Resins of Swansea, they are happy to
sell direct to public in small quantities. I used to deal with a guy
called Dave Smedley, on 01639 730481, although he may have moved on.

Ask if you need to know more.


--

Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"
Old Aug 10, 2008, 05:31 AM
SB11
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: New workshop - dodgy garage floor - advice sought

"jasonballamy" <jasonballamy.3dwzkn@rcgroups.com> wrote in message
news:jasonballamy.3dwzkn@rcgroups.com...
>
> I've used Watco products a few times, they do one that can go onto damp
> surfaces but I've not used that particular one. Worth giving them a call
> to see what they suggest.
>
> http://www.watco.co.uk/asp/autopage....=DSH&Group=FPC
>
> Jason
>
>
> --
> jasonballamy
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> jasonballamy's Profile: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u=203943
> View this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=906482
>


Jason,
Thanks, that looks like it may well do the trick.
Regards

Stuart

 


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