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Old Apr 17, 2008, 05:16 AM
Will.Fish1@googlemail.com
Guest
n/a Posts
Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes



I am looking for info on how to tell what size ISO insert I need from
a manufacturers size.
Has anyone any info on what the sandvik codes mean?

e.g.
R390-1704 08M-PM
R290.90-12T308PPM

I am not sure what the R390 or R290 etc mean

I assume the 12T3 is the same as an ISO 12T3 (12mm face, T3 thickness
around 4mm)


Anyone any info on this? I have checked google but searches seem to
give no useful results.
Old Apr 17, 2008, 06:12 AM
mark@ems-fife.co.uk
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes

On 17 Apr, 11:16, Will.Fi...@googlemail.com wrote:
> I am looking for info on how to tell what size ISO insert I need from
> a manufacturers size.
> Has anyone any info on what the sandvik codes mean?
>
> e.g.
> =A0R390-1704 08M-PM
> =A0R290.90-12T308PPM
>
> I am not sure what the R390 or R290 etc mean
>
> I assume the 12T3 is the same as an ISO 12T3 (12mm face, T3 thickness
> around 4mm)
>
> Anyone any info on this? I have checked google but searches seem to
> give no useful results.


R290.90-12T308PPM is a square,positive insert.IC is 13.29mm,edge
length is 10.7mm and thickness is 3.97mm,screw fixing.
R390-1704 08M-PM is roughly rhomboid shaped,cutting edge is 17mm
long,width is 9.6mm and at it`s thickest bit is 4.76mm
These are not ISO standard inserts.Manufacturers are more and more
moving away from ISO standards to their own shapes and designs.Sandvik
are leading the way here,even their threading inserts are non standard
now.With few exceptions no mainstream manufacturers produce standard
grooving and parting inserts either.
Mark.


Old Apr 17, 2008, 06:14 AM
mark@ems-fife.co.uk
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes

On 17 Apr, 12:12, "m...@ems-fife.co.uk" <m...@ems-fife.co.uk> wrote:
> On 17 Apr, 11:16, Will.Fi...@googlemail.com wrote:
>


> > e.g.
> > =A0R390-1704 08M-PM
> > =A0R290.90-12T308PPM

>
> > I am not sure what the R390 or R290 etc mean


I meant to add R290 etc are tool designations and only relate to
Sandvik.

Mark.



Old Apr 17, 2008, 12:34 PM
Austin Shackles
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes

On or around Thu, 17 Apr 2008 04:12:10 -0700 (PDT), "mark@ems-fife.co.uk"
<mark@ems-fife.co.uk> enlightened us thusly:

>These are not ISO standard inserts.Manufacturers are more and more
>moving away from ISO standards to their own shapes and designs.Sandvik
>are leading the way here,even their threading inserts are non standard
>now.With few exceptions no mainstream manufacturers produce standard
>grooving and parting inserts either.
>Mark.
>


Makes one wonder why we have standards. Bloody annoying, when they do that,
and counterproductive IMHO - I'm less likely to buy (e.g.) Sandvik tooling
if it has bespoke inserts and less likely to buy their inserts if they won't
fit other tools.
--
Austin Shackles. www.ddol-las.net my opinions are just that
Travel The Galaxy! Meet Fascinating Life Forms...
------------------------------------------------\
>> http://www.schlockmercenary.com/ << \ ...and Kill them.

a webcartoon by Howard Tayler; I like it, maybe you will too!
Old Apr 17, 2008, 12:48 PM
Peter A Forbes
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Re: Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes

On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 18:34:00 +0100, Austin Shackles
<austinDITCHTHISFORBETTERRESULTS@ddol-las.net> wrote:

>Makes one wonder why we have standards. Bloody annoying, when they do that,
>and counterproductive IMHO - I'm less likely to buy (e.g.) Sandvik tooling
>if it has bespoke inserts and less likely to buy their inserts if they won't
>fit other tools.


Makes sense from a manufacturing point of view, especially if they develop a
special cutting material for a particular application. Then they expect to have
repeat orders for the inserts.

Same as inkjet printer cartridges..... Ever seen two (genuine) printers
manufacturers sharing the same cartridge?

Peter
--
Peter & Rita Forbes
Email: diesel@easynet.co.uk
http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel
http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk
http://www.oldengine.co.uk
Old Apr 17, 2008, 01:31 PM
dave sanderson
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes

On 17 Apr, 18:34, Austin Shackles
<austinDITCHTHISFORBETTERRESU...@ddol-las.net> wrote:
> On or around Thu, 17 Apr 2008 04:12:10 -0700 (PDT), "m...@ems-fife.co.uk"
> <m...@ems-fife.co.uk> enlightened us thusly:
>
> >These are not ISO standard inserts.Manufacturers are more and more
> >moving away from ISO standards to their own shapes and designs.Sandvik
> >are leading the way here,even their threading inserts are non standard
> >now.With few exceptions no mainstream manufacturers produce standard
> >grooving and parting inserts either.
> >Mark.

>
> Makes one wonder why we have standards. Bloody annoying, when they do that,
> and counterproductive IMHO - I'm less likely to buy (e.g.) Sandvik tooling
> if it has bespoke inserts and less likely to buy their inserts if they won't
> fit other tools.
> --
> Austin Shackles. www.ddol-las.net my opinions are just that
> Travel The Galaxy! Meet Fascinating Life Forms...
> ------------------------------------------------\
> >> http://www.schlockmercenary.com/ << \ ...and Kill them.

> a webcartoon by Howard Tayler; I like it, maybe you will too!


OT
The reason there are so many standards is so that no matter what the
requirement
you can find one to fit
/OT

Dave
Old Apr 22, 2008, 02:56 AM
MikeH_QB
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Carbide insert codes and iso equivalent codes

On 17 Apr, 11:16, Will.Fi...@googlemail.com wrote:
> I am looking for info on how to tell what size ISO insert I need from
> a manufacturers size.
> Has anyone any info on what the sandvik codes mean?
>
> e.g.
> =A0R390-1704 08M-PM
> =A0R290.90-12T308PPM
>
> I am not sure what the R390 or R290 etc mean
>
> I assume the 12T3 is the same as an ISO 12T3 (12mm face, T3 thickness
> around 4mm)
>
> Anyone any info on this? I have checked google but searches seem to
> give no useful results.


Model Engineer Workshop magazine has been running a very detailed &
comprehensive set of articles about exactly this sort of thing
(Current issue has part 3)
hth
Mike
 


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