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Old Feb 05, 2008, 12:00 PM
Against it with you
Sprydle's Avatar
Houston, TX
Joined Feb 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leccyflyer
yeah - a good example of where Macca was right to get stroppy. I try to filter out the slushy bits from the album. I wonder if the fillum is available on DVD- I'd like to get it for my boy if it is.
Justr looked - yep it is available - but expensive! http://www.amazon.com/Beatles-Be-Nak...2234384&sr=8-1
I have this (or rather "had", I lent it to someone, and can't remember who).

I'd say it was excellent - very long mind you, but excellent.

http://www.amazon.com/Beatles-Anthol...2234238&sr=1-3
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 12:04 PM
Love & a Molotov cocktail
Punkie's Avatar
on a boat on the river cam
Joined Jan 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madsci_guy
Actually, Les Paul invented loops too. Look up "Les Paulverizer", the very first tape loop effects machine, which Les used extensively in live radio shows. All the Beatles did was copy his true innovation.

And he did it when the Beatles were still in grade school (1950), often inventing his own equipment, because no equipment was available. You ought to pick up some of his albums.

Les Paul also made a multi recording involving his playing 8 different parts on WAX record masters, in 1947, creating your basic "sound canvas". Mary Ford made multiple voice recordings providing a unique sound never heard before.

And of course, every solid body guitar the Beatles ever played, owes its genesis to Les Paul.
I have listened to some of the Les Paul material, it is so far ahead of its time, he was a true innovator, where he led others followed.
I quite like the songs he did with Mary ford.
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 12:08 PM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madsci_guy
Actually, Les Paul invented loops too. Look up "Les Paulverizer", the very first tape loop effects machine, which Les used extensively in live radio shows. All the Beatles did was copy his true innovation.

And he did it when the Beatles were still in grade school (1950), often inventing his own equipment, because no equipment was available. You ought to pick up some of his albums.

Les Paul also made a multi recording involving his playing 8 different parts on WAX record masters, in 1947, creating your basic "sound canvas". Mary Ford made multiple voice recordings providing a unique sound never heard before.

And of course, every solid body guitar the Beatles ever played, owes its genesis to Les Paul.
Hmmm, that last one might be a bit of a stretch.

George's distinctive "Get Back" rhythm part, played on a rosewood Telecaster, for a start.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAa3MQNVT2o
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 12:10 PM
E-flyer since 1981
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Joined Oct 2000
1,492 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by leccyflyer
I've had a tape of Abbey Road/Let It Be in the car for the past week or so - radio reception in central Scotland is lousy and I've had a few trips up and back - and it's been a while since I've listened to it.

As a result my boy is hearing them for pretty much the first time and he's knocked out with them.

He hated Across the Universe though.
Abbey Road: Phenomenal performance by Paul McCartney on 'Oh Darling' and one of the best recordings by the Beatles (John Lennon song) ever on ' Because'.

Actually, I agree with your son. Although somewhat pleasent to listen to, Across the Universe is somewhat boring, especially for A John Lennon song.
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 12:17 PM
Love & a Molotov cocktail
Punkie's Avatar
on a boat on the river cam
Joined Jan 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leccyflyer
Hmmm, that last one might be a bit of a stretch.

George's distinctive "Get Back" rhythm part, played on a rosewood Telecaster, for a start.
The claim is Les Paul built a solid Guitar "The Log" in the early 1940s and Fender Built the Esquire in 1946, which was after Les Paul. So did Fender get the idea from Les Pauls Log? If so, then the Telecaster can trace its inspiration to Les Paul.
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 12:31 PM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Punkie
The claim is Les Paul built a solid Guitar "The Log" in the early 1940s and Fender Built the Esquire in 1946, which was after Les Paul. So did Fender get the idea from Les Pauls Log? If so, then the Telecaster can trace its inspiration to Les Paul.
It's debateable Punkie.

Rickenbacker built an electric guitar with horsehoe piclups in the 30's, Charley Christian electrified his guitar around about then too. Then Les Paul built his log in the early 40's and at more or less the same time the Bigsby Travis solid body was developed. Leo Fender is suppoaed to have begun working on what became the Esquire and Broadcaster about then. The Broadcaster-to be renamed the Telecaster- was produced before any GIbson solid body. George's Rosewood Tele has a lineage that goes back unbroken to the first mass prodced solid body electric guitar.
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 01:03 PM
Figure Nine Champ
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North Texas
Joined Nov 2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leccyflyer
It's debateable Punkie.

Rickenbacker built an electric guitar with horsehoe piclups in the 30's, Charley Christian electrified his guitar around about then too.
They weren't solid bodies. Les has said that he invented the Log to solve problems with acoustic feedback common in hollow body electrics.

Quote:
Then Les Paul built his log in the early 40's and at more or less the same time the Bigsby Travis solid body was developed. Leo Fender is suppoaed to have begun working on what became the Esquire and Broadcaster about then. The Broadcaster-to be renamed the Telecaster- was produced before any GIbson solid body. George's Rosewood Tele has a lineage that goes back unbroken to the first mass prodced solid body electric guitar.
The Log was 1941, the Travis was 1947, according to my sources.

http://img3.photobucket.com/albums/v...ravis_1947.bmp
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 01:15 PM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
12,507 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by madsci_guy
They weren't solid bodies. Les has said that he invented the Log to solve problems with acoustic feedback common in hollow body electrics.



The Log was 1941, the Travis was 1947, according to my sources.

http://img3.photobucket.com/albums/v...ravis_1947.bmp
Like I said, the subject is one of debate as to who has the claim for the first electric guitar, or first solid body electric guitar, or first production solid body electric guitar. There are differing claims - Fender claim that they developed their guitar independently. Les Paul IIRC went to Gibson with his Log and they knocked him back, for several years, until the Fender guitar hove into view.

I'm just going to my club meeting for the evening, but I'll have a look in when I return later this evening.
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 07:13 PM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
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Here's a rather nice online article that describes the chronology and confirms the timing and contrasting claims in the development of the electric guitar.

http://www.americanheritage.com/arti...004_1_12.shtml

Tony Bacon's Ultimate Guitar Book has good detailed coverage of the rise of the electric guitar and describes the solid body as the product of a handful of visionary men, amongst them Les Paul, Paul Bigsby, Merle Travis and Leo Fender. The Bacon book also describes the claim that the Rickenbacker Electro model B has to be called the first solid bodied electric guitar.

The Telecaster owes little to Les Paul's log in terms of either cosmetics or construction and much more closely resembles the 1947 Bigsby-Travis guitar, though Fender have always (as far as I'm aware) claimed that the Broadcaster was developed independently from 1948 onwards. Indeed, according to Bacon, Leo Fender had buit a one-off solid body guitar in about 1943, which proved popular when hired out to local musicians. Leo Fender was joined by Don Kauffman, who had worked on developing the Rickenbacker Electro series in the mid 1940's.

As I mentioned earlier after Gibson had rejected Les Paul's Log in 1941, they came back to him ten years later, after the Broadcaster had been launched by Fender.

As reported in Les Paul's own words, in the Tony Bacon book (p63)

Quote:
He is quite certain what it was that eventually made Gibson warm to the idea of producing a solid electric guitar "Leo Fender started to make one" he told this author in 1989 "When Gibson heard about that they said - "Find that guy with the broomstick with the pickupson it!" They came to me in '51"
The Gibson Les Paul guitar, released in 1952, was the result. We're lucky to have the benefit of two magnificent instruments.
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Old Feb 05, 2008, 08:24 PM
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http://youtube.com/watch?v=foXSXOAfB4U
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