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Old May 01, 2008, 09:58 AM
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Ontario, NY
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I just ordered a radio/servo set from MACK products, as well as an electronic speed control. I'm thinking that I may have to get a different motor now though. Dumas recommends a 4.8 volt motor for this boat, which I had, and was planning to use running off 4 rechargeable double A's for now. However, after I ordered the speed control that MACK recommended, I see that it is for 6 to 12 volts. Would this matter? Could I still use it, or do I need to get a 6 volt motor and batteries?
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Old May 01, 2008, 12:41 PM
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Monterey Bay California
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You can buy a rechargable 7.2v Ni Cd pack for not much money... the rechargable AA pack would be close to 6v but if the ESC is a battery eliminator circuit (BEC) type, your run times would probably be very low with this set up...

Looks like this boat would like the weight of the bigger batteries as well...
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Old May 02, 2008, 09:34 PM
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Ontario, NY
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I think I will upgrade to a 7.2 volt battery pack as the speed controller will run off the main batteries as well. However, the esc recommended by MACK for this boat says that it is rated for 6-12 volts, now that I received it and read the packaging. Would a 7.2 volt battery pack, and this controller (7109 from MACK) work with the dumas 4.8 volt motor. I'm afraid that now I'm going to have to buy an new motor and batteries to work with this esc. Is this right, or will it work after all? If I do get a 6v motor, would the dumas model #2004 be a good choice for relatively scale speed? Thanks for any info!
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Old May 04, 2008, 08:48 PM
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Ontario, NY
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I now have the hull basically painted. I see a couple of spots that need to be sanded and re- sprayed in order to get some irregularities out. It's not perfect to say the least, but it is a learning experience on my first full model kit. I have certainly found some things to apply in the future especially in the painting and finishing departments. With a little more work though, I think it will come out pretty well for a first boat! Next, its finishing the cabin/ pilot house painting, windows, and installing the motor and other running gear.
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Old May 06, 2008, 07:39 PM
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Everything painted and put together. Just need windows, deck fittings, rudder/ running gear and electronics.
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Old May 19, 2008, 09:15 AM
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Ontario, NY
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still working.... but having a hard time with the windows. I can't seem to get them cut out neatly without getting glue on them, and I'm trying to figure out how to contour them with the casing shape, and get them to stay there until the glue is dry.

I also went back and sanded and repainted some spots on the hull sides and deck where for some reason the paint cracked or puckered. It looks better, but not as clean as I had hoped for. I guess a work boat shouldn't be perfect anyway though.
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Old May 19, 2008, 06:01 PM
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Lyman 135- I have been following you thread on the build and see that there is some confusion on the power setup from MACK Products for the boat. Maybe I can set the record straight. The power package from MACK is set up to run two (2) 7.2 volt NiCad or NiMH batteries in series to net 14.4 volts to the speed control. This will give you the most power with the longest run time with the #7109 speed control. The package for the boat came with a Y harness to setup the NiCad batteries in series. The motor will only draw around 600 mil amp at full power which will net you a run time of 2 to 3 hours from 2400 mil amp batteries. Oh and by the way that is running at dusk with the lights on. The MACK power package is far different than the one from DUMAS. The motor is about 2 times the power.
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Old May 19, 2008, 07:00 PM
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Ontario, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankg
Lyman 135- I have been following you thread on the build and see that there is some confusion on the power setup from MACK Products for the boat. Maybe I can set the record straight. The power package from MACK is set up to run two (2) 7.2 volt NiCad or NiMH batteries in series to net 14.4 volts to the speed control. This will give you the most power with the longest run time with the #7109 speed control. The package for the boat came with a Y harness to setup the NiCad batteries in series. The motor will only draw around 600 mil amp at full power which will net you a run time of 2 to 3 hours from 2400 mil amp batteries. Oh and by the way that is running at dusk with the lights on. The MACK power package is far different than the one from DUMAS. The motor is about 2 times the power.
I have already ordered and received the 7013 radio system and 7109 speed control from MACK as they were the ones recommended to me when I called, and I just ordered a couple of 7.2 volt packs from Tower Hobbies. I was told by a tech person at DUMAS that these battery packs and speed control would work fine with the 4.8 volt motor. Do you agree? I know it won't be a speed boat by any stretch, but will it physically work power- wise, or will this setup burn up the 4.8? I have the DUMAS 4.8 volt motor that was given to me by a friend. Which Mack motor is the one that you were referring to above, and will it still give relatively scale speed? I'm guessing its the 1885? Sorry for all the questions, but I just want to be sure that I don't wreck anything!
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Old May 20, 2008, 09:37 PM
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Lyman135- Yes the motor is the #1885 motor which is in the power package. If you try to run the DUMAS 4.8 volt motor on 14.4 volts, I think it will be smoke ville.
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Old May 27, 2008, 05:41 PM
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Ontario, NY
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A small setback. While drilling the hole for the rudder tube, I was looking so carefully at what I was drilling, that I didn't see one of the adjustment arms on the drill press touching the hull. When I heard the crack, it was too late. It punched a dime size whole through the bottom of the hull, near the back. Now I've got the hole repaired, but it does not look as nice as it did. I guess the bottom is a good place to make a mistake. Adds a bit of realism I suppose. Another lesson learned.......
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Old Jun 09, 2008, 06:09 PM
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Ontario, NY
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Does anyone have anything special that they use for control arms? Is there some common, lying around the house type object like coat hangers that will work, or should I get the real thing at the hobby store? I have always had it included in kits before, so I wasn't sure what is usually done. I just realized I don't have any for my rudder, and was hoping to get it all rigged tonight.
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Old Jun 09, 2008, 06:41 PM
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If your rudder shaft is 5/32" then a Dubro makes one for a steerable nose wheel.

I think most of use here use a wheel collar soldered to a piece of strip brass with a hole drilled in the end. Sanding and filing optional.
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Old Jun 09, 2008, 06:43 PM
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I don't think there is anything special to use for a control arm but since you have built boats before and you know what the parts look like and what they are supposed to do then you can use that info to substitute material for the job.
By "arm" do you mean the part that attaches to the rudder post or the rod that runs from the rudder to the servo? I've made both parts out of brass sheet,aluminum sheet,coat hangers,tye wire and just about anything else you can think of including balsa wood. Some worked fine and other's didn't last two seconds. It's fun to experiment with stuff and try to do these things yourself and only experience will get it right. That's the difference between scratch bult and kit built.
Having said all that,if the hobby shop has a part that will work then save yourself the agrivation of making it. Ready made parts are usually a better fit and work better than what you can make. Much cheaper too--usually.
I'm always making changes in my models so sometimes I have to make a part and keep making it over and over till I get it right. Give it a shot and see what you can do. You never know till you try. Pete
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Old Jun 09, 2008, 09:03 PM
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Thanks for the ideas. Those were the kinds of things I figured would work, was just wondering if anyone had found anything that was better than the "bought" ones. I figured store bought would work best, but I figured I'd ask just in case. I was going to try a hanger, but the holes in my servo are small enough that I'm going to need to buy some rod. Also, I was talking about the linkage arm between the rudder servo, and rudder shaft.
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Old Jun 10, 2008, 01:34 AM
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lyman135 if the hole is too small for the wire you have then drill out the hole. You want it to fit just right so don't make the hole too big. You don't want any more slop in the hook up than necessary. There should have been extra arms that came with the servo if you mess one up and if one hole doesn't work right then use the next one or drill your own. Make the rod as light as you can and once you have the rod picked out then drill practice holes in something to test for fit. Then drill the arm on the servo.
These models can cost you a lot of bucks especially in R/C as I'm sure you know. Anytime you can save a buck or two by using something laying around the house or your work bench you come out ahead. I've learned a lot of things on this forum like using hardware cloth for ships railing.I never would have thought of that and I've been at this for 40 years. Once you get to looking at things with your boats in mind you'll be surprised at how many things you can use instead of store bought. Pete
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