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Old Mar 03, 2011, 07:56 PM
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philipa_240sx's Avatar
Ontario, Canada
Joined Apr 2010
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Ray,

I dug back a few posts to find your dash graphics. Definitely going to add those, the interior looks so plain!

I also need to find a pilot figure... what size did you use again?
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 01:42 AM
Helis & Floatplanes
Tahuyeh's Avatar
United States, WA, Bremerton
Joined May 2009
162 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberJay
Making some progress..
That gear is looking very good, Jay. That's exactly the way I started to build my undercarriage before I got the streamlined tubing bug. Painting it to match will really be cool looking. I like!

Quote:
Originally Posted by philipa_240sx
I also need to find a pilot figure... what size did you use again?
I went to WallyMart and purchased the Fisher-Price Loving Family Dad and Sister figures for $5.00. Apparently they are no longer sold there individually, but are available here for a couple dollars more. I chose not to use the sister, but thought the dad looked about right. I fabricated the David Clark headset from scratch for "Ol' Wally". The yokes were fairly easy to construct from #12 copper house wire and a short piece of dowel for the hub. Here is a link to my post with the dash graphics and yoke photo.

Have fun guys!
Ray
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 03:53 AM
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gertjuh's Avatar
Nederland, ZH, Leiden
Joined May 2006
103 Posts
Haha good find
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 08:28 PM
Rsetiegerd Uesr
CyberJay's Avatar
USA, AR, Cave Springs
Joined Apr 2005
3,050 Posts
As promised... here's the complete mock up. As seen (including battery) it is 49oz. I'd be happy if it were lighter, but I think this is ok. I do about 320 watts on a fresh battery so I'm right at 100 watts per pound.

I need to do the polyurethane on the exposed wood. Then I need to prime and paint the floats and gear. (I have a little bit of soldering left on the gear mounts. Finally I need to figure out the water rudder. Either push-pull cable or mount a small servo in the float.

I covered all the holes in the bottom, and removed the left rear window as an air exit.

-Jay
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 09:48 PM
Helis & Floatplanes
Tahuyeh's Avatar
United States, WA, Bremerton
Joined May 2009
162 Posts
Jay - Your TC is coming along nicely. You've done an excellent job fabricating the landing gear... beautiful wrapping and soldering skills.

A lightweight push-pull cable running up to the aircraft's rudder might be your better choice. That's what I did on my Super Cub LP and it works very well. Instead of using packing tape to secure the cable, formed straight pins (resembling light weight eye bolts) or the like could be used to secure the cable to the airframe and float.

I'm just about ready to rig my water rudders. Going to try using Berkley Steelon nylon coated cable and cut-off fishhook eyes for the "pulley" system. Then, I'll get it balanced and get an AUW. Hope its not too heavy!

Keep up the good work, bro!
Ray
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 10:01 PM
Rsetiegerd Uesr
CyberJay's Avatar
USA, AR, Cave Springs
Joined Apr 2005
3,050 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahuyeh View Post
Jay - Your TC is coming along nicely. You've done an excellent job fabricating the landing gear... beautiful wrapping and soldering skills.

A lightweight push-pull cable running up to the aircraft's rudder might be your better choice. That's what I did on my Super Cub LP and it works very well. Instead of using packing tape to secure the cable, formed straight pins (resembling light weight eye bolts) or the like could be used to secure the cable to the airframe and float.

I'm just about ready to rig my water rudders. Going to try using Berkley Steelon nylon coated cable and cut-off fishhook eyes for the "pulley" system. Then, I'll get it balanced and get an AUW. Hope its not too heavy!

Keep up the good work, bro!
Ray
Wow that looks so good. You've done a great job on your airplane.

The problem with push-pull or even pull-pull is the amount of work it would take to install or remove. My Taylorcraft is one of my favorite planes, and being small it is very easy to bring out any time, any place. I have a set of gear with wheels on it, a set of gear with skis on it, and now the floats. It is a key goal to be able to swap the gear quickly from one to another.

That said, I do have the push-pull setup from eflite's .25 size floats and the little brass clips that they expect you to use with it. I do think that would be lighter than an additional servo, but the second servo is so easy because I can mount an extension in the fuse and just plug it in and go.

I imagine I'll have a water maiden sometime in the next week. Sunday looks nice, but I won't have them painted by then. Since I'm finally done making the landing gear I can pull the floats off and put the wheels back on, so the plane may fly Sunday even if it's not from the water.

As far as the wire work goes, I really enjoy working with metal. I think that's part of the reason I like your floats so much. I see the fun in all the metal work. The gear for these floats is only the second time I've been able to do this. The first time was replacement landing gear for my Eflite L-4 grasshopper. The dang stock gear was soft metal of some sort and it bent so easily. I built my own from .062" music wire and it's so much more solid now. There's pics in my blog that you may have seen.

-Jay
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 10:11 PM
Kool Kats Fly RC!! AMA 30462
sonny1's Avatar
United States, CA, Baywood-Los Osos
Joined Feb 2009
2,788 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberJay View Post
As promised... here's the complete mock up. As seen (including battery) it is 49oz. I'd be happy if it were lighter, but I think this is ok. I do about 320 watts on a fresh battery so I'm right at 100 watts per pound.

I need to do the polyurethane on the exposed wood. Then I need to prime and paint the floats and gear. (I have a little bit of soldering left on the gear mounts. Finally I need to figure out the water rudder. Either push-pull cable or mount a small servo in the float.

I covered all the holes in the bottom, and removed the left rear window as an air exit.

-Jay
I've been watching your progress and wanted to say what a beautiful job you're doing on this build Jay. Having flown ROW before I did want to ask just how strong is your fuselage mount? Did you reinforce both the bottom and the sides of the fuselage directly above the gear mounts? I've had a few hard water landings that didn't break the gear, but drove the gear up into the fuselage, mounting brackets and all. It wasn't with an EF Taylorcraft, but the principle still applies. I know the bottom of the fuselage on my Tcraft is very lightly made, and required reinforcement above the landing gear mount just for normal use, (like I saw that you did, but I added more I think than you did). With your AUW being more than what the fuse was designed to handle, and the fact that water is harder than it looks, (literally), I worry about the strength of your mounts as seen in the above photo. I have a set of floats set aside for eventual use on my Tcraft, and when I do that I'll add plywood and/or carbon reinforcement inside the fuse at each attachment point, going across the bottom and up the sides to diffuse and absorb any forces caused by hard "slap down" water landings, (with my piloting skills it's not a matter of "if" that will happen, it's a matter of "when"!). Judging by what I've seen of your impeccable work so far, you probably have those issues well in hand, I just thought I should ask. I'll be watching and cheering you on, keep the posts coming.

Here's something for you to look forward to; a good video of an EF Taylorcraft on floats; enjoy:
Sonny

E-flite Taylorcraft on Floats Maiden (3 min 57 sec)
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 10:29 PM
Rsetiegerd Uesr
CyberJay's Avatar
USA, AR, Cave Springs
Joined Apr 2005
3,050 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonny1 View Post
I've been watching your progress and wanted to say what a beautiful job you're doing on this build Jay. Having flown ROW before I did want to ask just how strong is your fuselage mount? Did you reinforce both the bottom and the sides of the fuselage directly above the gear mounts? I've had a few hard water landings that didn't break the gear, but drove the gear up into the fuselage, mounting brackets and all. It wasn't with an EF Taylorcraft, but the principle still applies. I know the bottom of the fuselage on my Tcraft is very lightly made, and required reinforcement above the landing gear mount just for normal use, (like I saw that you did, but I added more I think than you did). With your AUW being more than what the fuse was designed to handle, and the fact that water is harder than it looks, (literally), I worry about the strength of your mounts as seen in the above photo. I have a set of floats set aside for eventual use on my Tcraft, and when I do that I'll add plywood and/or carbon reinforcement inside the fuse at each attachment point, going across the bottom and up the sides to diffuse and absorb any forces caused by hard "slap down" water landings, (with my piloting skills it's not a matter of "if" that will happen, it's a matter of "when"!). Judging by what I've seen of your impeccable work so far, you probably have those issues well in hand, I just thought I should ask. I'll be watching and cheering you on, keep the posts coming.
Well.. Where to start.. My front gear mount, where the wheels go, is stock on this airplane. I think you saw pics of Tahuyeh's plane where he beefed up the front gear mount. I landed in tall grass and ripped the gear out of my old Taylorcraft and rebuilt the area with a little extra material but not too much. I never felt as though I was going to damage the airframe except for when I landed in the tall grass, and at that point, it's a crash and you get what you get.

The rear mount consists of 1/4" plywood as the main piece and a 3/32nds piece of basswood between the plywood and the covering, if that makes sense. I meant to take a pic of the mount when I had it mocked up in my old fuselage (With no covering) but I forgot. Now it's epoxied into my new airframe so the pic attached is the best I could get.

I have been thinking about some gussets up to the sides.

God, I hate to say it, because it will pretty much doom me to destroy it on it's water maiden, but... I'm a pretty good pilot. As long as I'm not screwing around I will grease it in, wheels, skis, floats, whatever. Not saying it won't happen, just that I don't know how much beefing up I need to do.

I try to build the planes to fly, not to crash. If you build them to crash they end up flying like bricks.

I do think I will add some gussets to the rear mounts though, just triangles up to the sides of the former. Shouldn't add too much weight.

-Jay

EDIT: Here's a little blatant self promotion: My Toledo Special video.

I've seen that video of the guy's TC with the Supercub floats.. I think the SC floats are really too small for the TC. They're like 22-23" and the supercub weighs nearly a pound less than the TC if I remember right. Obviously they work, but I think the plane sits really low in the water.
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Last edited by CyberJay; Mar 04, 2011 at 10:37 PM.
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Old Mar 04, 2011, 10:58 PM
Kool Kats Fly RC!! AMA 30462
sonny1's Avatar
United States, CA, Baywood-Los Osos
Joined Feb 2009
2,788 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberJay View Post
Well.. Where to start.. My front gear mount, where the wheels go, is stock on this airplane. I think you saw pics of Tahuyeh's plane where he beefed up the front gear mount. I landed in tall grass and ripped the gear out of my old Taylorcraft and rebuilt the area with a little extra material but not too much. I never felt as though I was going to damage the airframe except for when I landed in the tall grass, and at that point, it's a crash and you get what you get.

The rear mount consists of 1/4" plywood as the main piece and a 3/32nds piece of basswood between the plywood and the covering, if that makes sense. I meant to take a pic of the mount when I had it mocked up in my old fuselage (With no covering) but I forgot. Now it's epoxied into my new airframe so the pic attached is the best I could get.

I have been thinking about some gussets up to the sides.

God, I hate to say it, because it will pretty much doom me to destroy it on it's water maiden, but... I'm a pretty good pilot. As long as I'm not screwing around I will grease it in, wheels, skis, floats, whatever. Not saying it won't happen, just that I don't know how much beefing up I need to do.

I try to build the planes to fly, not to crash. If you build them to crash they end up flying like bricks.

I do think I will add some gussets to the rear mounts though, just triangles up to the sides of the former. Shouldn't add too much weight.

-Jay

EDIT: Here's a little blatant self promotion: My Toledo Special video.

I've seen that video of the guy's TC with the Supercub floats.. I think the SC floats are really too small for the TC. They're like 22-23" and the supercub weighs nearly a pound less than the TC if I remember right. Obviously they work, but I think the plane sits really low in the water.
You're right, that was Tahuyeh's post that I saw, and I suspected you might be a decent pilot after noticing how well you build. I on the other hand have to bring hard hats with me when I fly to protect the innocent. The area you show in the photo above is where I put plywood across the brace and up the sides and epoxied it in on mine, (because I know how I land...on any surface!!). The only reason I asked was an occasion where I had a rather hard water landing, but didn't dunk it, just "smacked" down. I started to taxi for another ROW and noticed the plane was leaning off to one side, I decided to taxi it back and saw that I had driven the gear up through the bottom of the fuse on that hard landing; glad I caught it before I tried to take off again!
Like I said before, your work speaks for itself; keep the posts coming, I'm enjoying them.

Sonny
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 01:19 AM
Helis & Floatplanes
Tahuyeh's Avatar
United States, WA, Bremerton
Joined May 2009
162 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonny1
You're right, that was Tahuyeh's post that I saw
The weaknesses of the E-flite Taylorcraft 450 ARF have been well documented in this forum for a number of years. Since it is almost fully assembled, we augment the flimsy framework the best we can without undergoing a total reconstruction project - using the experiences and recommendations of those that have assembled this aircraft prior to our ownership. Then, we pass our experiences on as well.

Since it appears that you have confused Jay's and my posts, I'm not quite sure what you are trying to tell me (us), other than "build strong". Since, like I've said, this is an ARF, we do the best we can in that department.

BTW, I too have been building and flying model aircraft and helicopters since before time began - way before radio control equipment was commercially available. Through all these years I have been constantly amazed at how cool this hobby continues to be through ever changing technology.

Cheers,
Ray
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 02:57 AM
Kool Kats Fly RC!! AMA 30462
sonny1's Avatar
United States, CA, Baywood-Los Osos
Joined Feb 2009
2,788 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahuyeh View Post
The weaknesses of the E-flite Taylorcraft 450 ARF have been well documented in this forum for a number of years. Since it is almost fully assembled, we augment the flimsy framework the best we can without undergoing a total reconstruction project - using the experiences and recommendations of those that have assembled this aircraft prior to our ownership. Then, we pass our experiences on as well.

Since it appears that you have confused Jay's and my posts, I'm not quite sure what you are trying to tell me (us), other than "build strong". Since, like I've said, this is an ARF, we do the best we can in that department.

BTW, I too have been building and flying model aircraft and helicopters since before time began - way before radio control equipment was commercially available. Through all these years I have been constantly amazed at how cool this hobby continues to be through ever changing technology.

Cheers,
Ray
That's basically the idea, "build strong" applies to many balsa/ply arf's. Manufacturers use a little material as possible to keep costs down while still making their designs flyable, so it's up to us to make them "survivable. I too have been around since radio control was an "exotic" aspect of the sport, starting out and competing in free flight from the early 60's; my first NATS was 1963. RC sailplanes followed in the 70's way before programmable radios or even servo reversing, (all adjustments were made with the linkage), electric flight in the late 70's, (we used RC car motors direct drive on nicads with micro switches mounted to servos for "on/off" throttle control). Still getting used to the arf thing, and I'm just getting started on foamies, but I still have balsa kits on the workbench, and they are what I still feel most comfortable with. Being a long time sailplane pilot, I learned that more reinforcement added the better, (sailplanes don't mind the extra weight), so I was just sharing 40 years worth of "two cents worth" experience. You are doing a very thorough and well thought out build, thank you for sharing it with us.

Sonny
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 08:21 AM
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Joe in Dublin's Avatar
Dublin, Ca
Joined Nov 2007
127 Posts
So im new to this thread and picking up a used talyor this weekend, what key areas should i reinforce... Thx
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 01:10 PM
Just having fun
Fredriksson's Avatar
United States, KY, Hopkinsville
Joined Feb 2008
2,093 Posts
I need some advice on repairing a stripped screw hole. This is the screw that fastens the wing strut to the bottom side of the fuselage up by the landing gear. The last time I flew my TC I found that this screw was missing. I had another in my tool kit but it would not catch on any threads. It is apparent that the hole is stripped out.

I had planned on putting some CA into the hole, letting it dry and then putting the screw in. But then was thinking that maybe something else would be better. Any suggestions or should I just use the CA?

Thanks in advance for the help.

Freddy
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 01:16 PM
Just having fun
Fredriksson's Avatar
United States, KY, Hopkinsville
Joined Feb 2008
2,093 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe in Dublin View Post
So im new to this thread and picking up a used talyor this weekend, what key areas should i reinforce... Thx
Welcome Joe. You are gonna love your TC. It is one gorgeous and great flying plane.

Others may pipe in but I believe the major areas are the motor box and the landing gear attachment areas. I used CA around all joints on the motor box and landing gear support areas. I then added some gorilla glue to the landing gear support area. I have not yet had any real hard landings but the landing gear support seems to be pretty strong.

I have seen where others have added balsa to the landing gear support area. Look here - post 3734 for some pictures.

Freddy
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 01:16 PM
Things that do fly
Magic k2's Avatar
In my house ;-) The uk
Joined Dec 2008
2,710 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahuyeh View Post
Jay - Your TC is coming along nicely. You've done an excellent job fabricating the landing gear... beautiful wrapping and soldering skills.

A lightweight push-pull cable running up to the aircraft's rudder might be your better choice. That's what I did on my Super Cub LP and it works very well. Instead of using packing tape to secure the cable, formed straight pins (resembling light weight eye bolts) or the like could be used to secure the cable to the airframe and float.

I'm just about ready to rig my water rudders. Going to try using Berkley Steelon nylon coated cable and cut-off fishhook eyes for the "pulley" system. Then, I'll get it balanced and get an AUW. Hope its not too heavy!

Keep up the good work, bro!
Ray
Didnt think the TC could look any better than stock,,,you have proved me wrong ,,,awsome dude
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