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Old Sep 08, 2008, 08:29 AM
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I was thinking about that, but I'm in a tough spot at this point... The support plate by the servos will be very difficult to get the rods through once the covering is on, although I suppose anything is possible with enough tenacity.

But shouldn't the control rods be tied down in the middle of the fuse, to keep them from bending under load? I guess if I CA the tubes at each end, that shouldn't be much of a concern. I was thinking about tying them in the middle but somewhat loosely, so I can slide the tube forward in the fuse and thus get the end of it inside the hole at the back, making covering a bit easier.
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Old Sep 08, 2008, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habitforming
here's what I came up with. I used an 1/8" brass tube as a punch to make the holes.
Dear habit,

Is this your first build? The Miss-Stick kit is a pretty challenging build. Good job! As you know, Miss-Stick the kit is mostly assembles from sticks.

Regarding the control rods, do you want the bad news or the good news first? The good news is that your sheet balsa fabrication around the control rod looks great! The bad news is that the original structure would have worked just fine. You would have just cut the covering around the control rod exit slots.

There is an issue with the control rod exit holes at the back of your fuselage. Due to control surface deflection, these exit holes need to be slots that allow the end of the control rods to float. The control rod tubes need to be anchored at two points. These two anchor points should be at 1/3 and at 2/3 the distance between the servos and control surfaces. These distances can be adjusted by eye-ball. These anchor points will allow the rods to be able to deflect as the servo arms, and control horns, deflect. If you can make slots out of the control rod exits you will get smoother control surface operation.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Sep 08, 2008, 11:59 AM
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Thanks for the thoughts and compliments Bruce! This is actually my second build, but my first "real" build. Previous to this was a TinyX, which you may know doesn't have a built up fuse and thus I didn't have this situation to deal with. I probably bit off a bit more than I can chew with the Miss Stik, but the fiancee wanted THIS plane and we all know how that goes...

I started to notice that friction as I fooled with it more last night, and already planned to open the holes in the rear up a bit. The rudder hole might be challenging, but I have a lot to work with on the elevator hole. Unfortunately I already hardened them with thin CA, so it will be more work now.

In regards to fixing the tubes at 1/3 and 2/3 length - do you have a recommended way of doing this? My problem is that I want to fix the tubes in place now, but that will make covering difficult with the tube sticking out the back. But if I cover it first, then how to tie down the tube inside the covered fuse?

I'll have to pull that panel up by the servos off. That's glued real good too... dangit

Sorry if I'm getting a bit off topic from covering here. I'm not getting much feedback in my build thread, so this seems the best place to get my questions answered
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Old Sep 09, 2008, 09:25 AM
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Control Rod Flex and Covering Tip

Quote:
Originally Posted by habitforming
Thanks for the thoughts and compliments Bruce! This is actually my second build, but my first "real" build. Previous to this was a TinyX, which you may know doesn't have a built up fuse and thus I didn't have this situation to deal with. I probably bit off a bit more than I can chew with the Miss Stik, but the fiancee wanted THIS plane and we all know how that goes...
Dear habit,

The Aero Craft/Hobby Lobby planes are "built-from-sticks". This type of construction is popular with scratch builders. It is relatively easy to duplicate the Aero Craft designs from a set of plans. Built-from-sticks airframes are light and strong. These types of planes fly very nicely. The issue is that planes that are built-from-sticks take a long time to build. The Miss-Stick is a pretty plane that will fly well. Your airframe looks great.
Quote:
Originally Posted by habitforming
I started to notice that friction as I fooled with it more last night and already planned to open the holes in the rear up a bit. The rudder hole might be challenging, but I have a lot to work with on the elevator hole. Unfortunately I already hardened them with thin CA, so it will be more work now.
There are to competing goals for a control rod system. You want the control response to be consistent and proportional at all speeds. For best control response you want rigid control arms. However, servos and control surfaces travel in arcs. To keep the control system from binding you want control rod flexibility. The compromise is to hold the rod rigid in the middle, but allow the rod to deflect at the ends. 1/3 and 2/3 is just a starting point. Grab your rod near the end and test the flexibility. Move the flex point until you are satisfied that the rod has sufficient deflection. This is the one mounting point for the rod. Thinner rods may need three or more mounting points. Thicker rods may only need one. The number of mounting points also depends on the length of the rod. The location of the mounting points varies. The idea is to make sure you provide some deflection at the rod end so the control rod does not bind. A rod that binds on the servo end can strip the servo gears. A rod that binds at the control surface end can cause the stabilizers to twist. The binding control rod can push cause the fin to twist sideways, and/or the H.Stab to twist up or down. This twisting of the stabilizers can cause very erratic control response. Parkflyers are particularly susceptible to stabilizer twisting since the empennage components tend to be fairly thin.
Quote:
Originally Posted by habitforming
In regards to fixing the tubes at 1/3 and 2/3 length - do you have a recommended way of doing this? My problem is that I want to fix the tubes in place now, but that will make covering difficult with the tube sticking out the back. But if I cover it first, then how to tie down the tube inside the covered fuse?
You will need to fix the tubes in plane before you cover the fuselage. All you need do is put a small x-shaped hole in the covering and slip this over the protruding tube. Tack the cover down adjacent to the tube. Then you continue to pull and tack the covering to the rest of the fuselage. Once the fuselage is completely covered, you make sure the covering is sealed around the control exit slot. You trim the covering to expose the control exit slot.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Sep 09, 2008, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoFlyZone
Hi 7rider,

In reply #47 in this very thread, does the plane in the picture sort of resemble what you are tryig to do?

Chuck
Yes.
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Old Oct 19, 2008, 11:55 PM
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Indianola Iowa
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Hi All
I have a question , Going to atempt to cover my First model build.
I purchased a new "Sealing Iron" from HobbyZone. The heat settings on it are "Low , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , High" How do these coraspond to to the different deg settings in the instructions ?
I thank you for any help any body can give.
Jerry
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Old Oct 20, 2008, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayers1
Hi All
I have a question , Going to atempt to cover my First model build.
I purchased a new "Sealing Iron" from HobbyZone. The heat settings on it are "Low , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , High" How do these coraspond to to the different deg settings in the instructions ?
I thank you for any help any body can give.
Jerry
Hi Jerry,

Real pros, like Bruce, can probably use a branding iron stuck into a camp fire to cover their planes.

I, on the other hand, use a cheap infrared temperature meter to set my iron temperatures.

One of the benefits of using a slightly more expensive iron, over the less expensive versions, is that the cheaper irons can actually fluctuate in temperature as much as 40 degrees at the same setting. In other words, if you 'set' it for say 200 degrees.... it's not uncommon for it to actually fluctuate between 180 and 220 during the time you are using it.

If the above makes no sense... please don't ask me to clarify it; because I'm not so sure I even understand what I just said myself!

I hate getting old...

Chuck
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Old Oct 20, 2008, 12:16 AM
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WLV, CA
Joined Aug 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayers1
Hi All
I have a question , Going to atempt to cover my First model build.
I purchased a new "Sealing Iron" from HobbyZone. The heat settings on it are "Low , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , High" How do these coraspond to to the different deg settings in the instructions ?
I thank you for any help any body can give.
Jerry
I have the same problem with my iron and no way to tell the temperature. Some coverings have instructions on how to test the covering. I used Coverite micro lite for the first time and they give a test to perform on a 2"x2" square. At such a degree it slowly curls at the edges and at a higher specified degree it gets wavy and curly while held on the iron. Personally if its the first time I'm using a covering I make a mock up or cover a hatch first to see how the covering goes on. With my first kit I covered and peeled the battery hatch about three times before I got the hang of it, saved a lot of aggravation, money and time because I got the wing and fuse right the first time. Following this tutorial also helps big time .
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Old Oct 20, 2008, 01:39 AM
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Indianola Iowa
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Thank you so much IH8VTEC
Jerry
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Old Oct 20, 2008, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayers1
Hi All
I have a question , Going to atempt to cover my First model build.
I purchased a new "Sealing Iron" from HobbyZone. The heat settings on it are "Low , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , High" How do these coraspond to to the different deg settings in the instructions ?
I thank you for any help any body can give.
Jerry
Dear Jerry,

Take a look at Chapter 13 of this tutorial; Covering and Iron Temperature.
Link to Chapter 13

Do your instructions give you any specifications on temperature range? Most irons have a heat range from about 100 to 350 degrees F. My Coverite 21st Century Sealing Iron ranges from 150 to 400 degrees F. Generally speaking, the difference between the lowest and highest setting is 250 to 300 degrees F. The Hanger 9 iron sold by HobbyZone has a high temperature of about 450 degrees F.

Assuming that "Low" is 150 degrees F, and "High" is 450 degrees F; each increment is 50 degrees. Therefore:

Low = 150
#1 = 200
# 2 = 250
# 3 = 300
# 4 = 350
# 5 = 400
High = 450

This mapping of settings to temperature is not precise. However, this mapping should give you a starting point. The suggestion by IH8VTEC to make a test block is a good one. Chuck's (NoFlyZone) use of an infrared temperature meter is also a good idea. Even if your iron was marked with temperature increments you would still need to experiment a little.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Oct 20, 2008, 03:05 PM
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Indianola Iowa
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Hi Bruce
Thank You , I am sure their will be more questions.
Edit: The more questions I spoke of. Covering With Topflight Econokote , covered a small piece for practice 1/2 the elavator open structor , Won,t shrink to remove wrinkiles ? Will a 1600 watt hair dryer work as a heat gun ?
Thank you
Jerry
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 08:11 AM
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EconoKote Needs a lot of Heat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayers1
Hi Bruce
Thank You , I am sure their will be more questions.
Edit: The more questions I spoke of. Covering With Topflight Econokote , covered a small piece for practice 1/2 the elavator open structor , Won,t shrink to remove wrinkiles ? Will a 1600 watt hair dryer work as a heat gun ?
Thank you
Jerry
Dear Jerry,

I have used TopFlite EconoKote and found it needs a lot of heat to bond and shrink. A hair dryer does not work very well to shrink covering. A hair dryer outlet temperature is too low. A hobby heat gun has an outlet temperature of about 450 degrees F. Your sealing iron can be set high enough to shrink the covering.

To get the best results, you want to attach the covering in such a way that minimizes wrinkles prior to shrinking. EconoKote, in particular, does not shrink as much as SolarFilm or So-Lite. When applied properly, EconoKote will make a strong puncture resistant covering. However, I prefer So-Lite for small parkflyers, Solarfilm for larger electrics and smallish glow planes, and Hangar 9 UltraCote for larger glow planes.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 09:31 AM
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Indianola Iowa
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Thank you Bruce
Who carrys the gun you recomend ? How is the Hanger 9 Gun ?
Thank You
Jerry
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 09:41 AM
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Hi Jerry,

I'd get Bruce's gun if you could. I have the Hangar 9 gun, and while it does have two heat settings that work very well, the nozzle has now taken to falling off the gun at the most inopportune times.

For the life of me, I don't know why it suddenly started doing this, and I don't know how to prevent it.

Chuck
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 10:11 PM
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Indianola Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoFlyZone
Hi Jerry,

I'd get Bruce's gun if you could. I have the Hangar 9 gun, and while it does have two heat settings that work very well, the nozzle has now taken to falling off the gun at the most inopportune times.

For the life of me, I don't know why it suddenly started doing this, and I don't know how to prevent it.

Chuck
Hi Chuck
A couple of small sheet metal screws maybe , or do you have to be able to take it off & on easly. ?

Bruce , Chuck Do you know where that gun pictured is available ? I think I have found it http://www.rcdude.com/servlet/the-63...eat-Gun/Detail , but know nothing about this Vendor.
Thanks
Jerry
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