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Old Oct 22, 2008, 10:02 AM
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R/C Dude and Heat Gun

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayers1
Hi Chuck
A couple of small sheet metal screws maybe , or do you have to be able to take it off & on easly. ?

Bruce , Chuck Do you know where that gun pictured is available ? I think I have found it http://www.rcdude.com/servlet/the-63...eat-Gun/Detail , but know nothing about this Vendor.
Thanks
Jerry
Dear Jerry.

The Anderson "Top Gun" is indeed the heat gun I have. I bought my Heat Gun locally at Thompsons Hobbies. I have not bought from R/C Dude Hobbies; I cannot make a recommendation either way.

The Anderson heat gun is a great product. The plastic case stays nice and cool. The gun is quiet, the controls are nice, and the heat output is perfect. I had a Hobbico heat gun before I bought the Anderson gun. The Hobbico gun was terrible and kept falling apart!

I would guess that R/C Dude is a good vendor. The bad vendors do not stay in business long.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Oct 22, 2008, 01:53 PM
If it flies, I will crash it
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Bruce,
I actually use a small hobby heat gun my wife has for her hobby. It actually works extremely well. The advantage to it is that it has a very low blower speed and it seems to be much easier to control. I have burned threw the covering with it a couple of times but that was early on and I haven't had that problem in a while. It is at least much easier to control then my commercial heat gun was.

Does the Anderson gun work similarly. I have seen it at Jerry's and I may need to get one for myself soon. My wife keeps having to "Find" hers if you know what I mean.

Rob...
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Last edited by mxspode; Oct 22, 2008 at 01:55 PM. Reason: Added photo.
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Old Oct 22, 2008, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mxspode
<snip>

Does the Anderson gun work similarly. I have seen it at Jerry's and I may need to get one for myself soon. My wife keeps having to "Find" hers if you know what I mean.

Rob...
Dear Rob,

The Anderson heat gun has a two speed fan. The nozzle has an extension that allows you to control exactly where the heat is applied. I like the Anderson gun very much.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 10:41 AM
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You can also get a heat gun at "Harbor Freight" for around $10. Two guns are available, on for $20 and one for $15 (now on sale for $10). I bought the $20 one on sale for half price. They are both dual temps putting out around 600 and 1000 degree air, maybe a little warm for what we do but then I can also use it for paint stripping, etc. I also use it for shrink tubing when adding end connectors to wires.

One problem with heat guns is they apply (air) pressure on the heated film, stretching it out as they heat. With some films the stretching and shrinking cancel each other out and the end result is no shrinkage. The iron seems to be the best bet for most film shrink work.

Richard
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 11:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rszanti

One problem with heat guns is they apply (air) pressure on the heated film, stretching it out as they heat. With some films the stretching and shrinking cancel each other out and the end result is no shrinkage. The iron seems to be the best bet for most film shrink work.

Richard
Hi Richard,

As a beginner to covering myself, I was a little intimidated by the seemingly uncontrollable application of heat with the heat gun. So my first couple of builds, I used my irons only to cover the open wing structures. It gave me a sense of 'being in control'.

However, I wasn't able to get the wings to look just right, because no matter how careful I was, I always managed to seal the covering on various areas of the ribs. This made (in my opinion) for a rather unsightly wing covering.

I think the prettiest wing coverings are those that seem to have the covering stretched across all the ribs, without actually being stuck (sealed) to the ribs themselves. The only way I can get this kind of look is with my heat gun. Of course, the necessary experimentation and technique usually means I manage to punch a hole or two in the covering as I'm learning, but with Bruce's technique for repair, I just accept the fact that it won't be 'perfect', and use it as a learning experience.

Besides, a well placed piece of vinyl tape or decal will cover all mistakes...

Chuck
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 03:22 PM
If it flies, I will crash it
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USA, CO, Westminster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rszanti
You can also get a heat gun at "Harbor Freight" for around $10. Two guns are available, on for $20 and one for $15 (now on sale for $10). I bought the $20 one on sale for half price. They are both dual temps putting out around 600 and 1000 degree air, maybe a little warm for what we do but then I can also use it for paint stripping, etc. I also use it for shrink tubing when adding end connectors to wires.

One problem with heat guns is they apply (air) pressure on the heated film, stretching it out as they heat. With some films the stretching and shrinking cancel each other out and the end result is no shrinkage. The iron seems to be the best bet for most film shrink work.

Richard
The blowing holes in the covering issue is exactly why I like my wife's little gun I posted about above. It has a very low fan speed so the pressure is real low. I can actually watch the shrink proceed along an area and still work in a relatively small space, unlike the commercial unit I started with. I had to keep it a great distance away from the project and when I would get frustrated and need to heat a small area I would get to close and put a hole in the covering.

I think a good point to be made is that one would be well served by getting a unit designed for hobbies instead of a commercial type that is designed for stripping paint. You will be much less likely to get frustrated with covering if you start with less problems.

Rob...
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Old Oct 28, 2008, 12:20 PM
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USA, CA, Mountain View
Joined Dec 2007
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Suggestions on how to remove covering

I tacked down some yellow Solite on the front part of my wing, and I don't like how it looks. What's the best way to remove it from my wing?
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Old Oct 28, 2008, 12:23 PM
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Caution on using two different weights of covering

I applied Solite to the bottom of an aileron and a thicker covering from HobbyCity to the top. When I tightened both sides, the top side pulled tighter than the bottom side and warped the aileron, so be careful when you're covering two sides of a thin structure with different weight coverings. Or just try to use the same weight if possible.

Right now, I'm trying to flatten the ailerons (for a Stevens Aero Shaft), between two large books with weights on them.
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Old Nov 18, 2008, 07:30 AM
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Removing Covering

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7rider
I tacked down some yellow Solite on the front part of my wing, and I don't like how it looks. What's the best way to remove it from my wing?
Dear 7rider,

I find the best way to remove covering is to apply some heat to re-activate the adhesive. You may have to lightly sand certain areas to remove some of the stubborn covering.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Nov 18, 2008, 07:44 AM
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Warped Aileron

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7rider
I applied Solite to the bottom of an aileron and a thicker covering from HobbyCity to the top. When I tightened both sides, the top side pulled tighter than the bottom side and warped the aileron, so be careful when you're covering two sides of a thin structure with different weight coverings. Or just try to use the same weight if possible.

Right now, I'm trying to flatten the ailerons (for a Stevens Aero Shaft), between two large books with weights on them.
Dear 7rider,

The structure of a typical parkflyer is pretty light. I do not recommend using two different type of coverings on thin components such as control surfaces, and/or wings. The issue is that different coverings have different tensile strength.

Trying to straighten a warp component between two books is likely not going to work well.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Nov 18, 2008, 01:18 PM
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Hi Bruce,

In post #144 you have a pic of your modified Wattage AT-6 that I have pasted below.

In one of our PM's a while back, you spoke of sometimes using a heat gun, and a "hot glove" when applying covering. The circled area of the pic really caught my eye, as it seems to have not only a concave area, but a convex area right along side of it.

In other words, a beginner's nightmare... LOL

Is this where you use that hot glove and heat gun technique? I am really intrigued by that area of the plane!

Chuck
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Old Nov 18, 2008, 02:08 PM
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Molded Fuselage

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoFlyZone
Hi Bruce,

In post #144 you have a pic of your modified Wattage AT-6 that I have pasted below.

In one of our PM's a while back, you spoke of sometimes using a heat gun, and a "hot glove" when applying covering. The circled area of the pic really caught my eye, as it seems to have not only a concave area, but a convex area right along side of it.

In other words, a beginner's nightmare... LOL

Is this where you use that hot glove and heat gun technique? I am really intrigued by that area of the plane!

Chuck
Dear Chuck,

The area you circled is called a fillet. Unfortunately, I cannot take any credit for covering the fillet on the AT-6. This plane is a Global Wattage ARF with a molded plastic fuselage. The fillet is molded and painted yellow.

As you well know a fillet is concave. The film tends to lift off the concave fillet as the film shrinks. The best way to cover a fillet is to use two pieces. One piece is used for the horizontal area. The other piece is used for the vertical area. Both pieces have to be trimmed prior to bonding to the contour of the fillet.

This is not an easy thing to do.

Thanks, Bruce
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Old Nov 18, 2008, 02:26 PM
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Hi Bruce,

Ummmm, now I feel like an idiot... LOL.

But to tell you the truth, I'd rather feel like an idiot than face the prospect of trying to learn to cover an area like that...

Thanks for clearing that up!

Chuck
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Old Dec 26, 2008, 12:36 AM
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New Zealand
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Hi Bruce,
I just wanted to say thanks, your thread has made my first covering job a lot easier than I thought it would be
I've only got the wing to go now, I thought I'd leave it till last. Its a 28" wingspan pylon racer, silver fuse and transperant blue for the wing.
-Reuben
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Old Dec 26, 2008, 01:10 AM
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Bailey, CO
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Very Pretty Plane

Quote:
Originally Posted by ben199
Hi Bruce,
I just wanted to say thanks, your thread has made my first covering job a lot easier than I thought it would be
I've only got the wing to go now, I thought I'd leave it till last. Its a 28" wingspan pylon racer, silver fuse and transperant blue for the wing.
-Reuben
Dear Reuben,

You plane is a sleek beauty! I am glad you found this tutorial useful. I hope you don't mind if I take a bit of pride in your results! Nice work!

Thanks, Bruce
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