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Old Jun 26, 2007, 03:46 PM
Damp and Dizzy member
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Bozeman, Montana, United States
Joined Aug 2003
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She may be weed-free while traveling forward, but that lower gudgeon will snag, or at least impede, a towline that's dragging along the keel from stern to bowhook, ie backwards wrt the hull. Like I wrote, even a knot will catch a towline.

You could defeat this snag by tug operation (I do this to make the towline miss the keels of my barges). A) make sure the towline is sunk deeper than the keel at the stern, to clear the snagpoint, by adding weights. B) then once the towline is past the snagpoint, angle the tug away from the schooner and increase speed enough to haul the towline closer to the surface so it drags along the keel until it catches your hook (or in my case, catches the dangling bowline). You might have to experiment with weights (and floats) placed on the towline to get the droop you want when the tug is moving slowly up the hull toward the bow.

Even if you snag the gugeon, you should be able to turn the tug away and free the line for another attempt. This turn-away manuver is one reason I find a long towline works better than a short one. If the towline is short, you don't have manuvering room.
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Old Jul 02, 2007, 08:00 AM
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Millbrook, Alabama
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Update on tug

She got her maiden voyage today. I also got the “Emergency Breakaway” tow line system installed and it works great. I will get pics of that soon.

I had some electronic problems with her. She appeared to be signal losing signal while only about 50 yards away. She was shutting completely down. I may need to route the receiver antenna back up out of the hull? Also for some reason the ESC auto settings got confused and my throttle settings were not where they should have been. I’m not sure what is going on there, but everything worked fine in the ship yard before the first cruise. I may try the stock Aqua Craft ESC in it next time.

She has very weak thrust with the current prop although she was realistic at full throttle.

All in all…she will become a good little tug…with some more work.

Captain Slick
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 07:45 AM
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Millbrook, Alabama
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Tug Boat Belinda goes to Work.

Here are some pics of the tug boat Belinda on July 4th. I attempt to show the “Emergency Breakaway” system and the new antenna route. The tow system consists of a tube (former exacto knife handle”) going through the deck, hidden behind the bollard. Through this tube, which is tall enough to keep water from finding its way below deck, goes the tow rope which has a loop in the end. The loop is stuffed down the tube and a rod connected to a servo is released, after being retracted, to slide through the loop. The tow line is now secure until the servo control stick is pushed. The system works great. Only one little hiccup and that was solved by removing the 2 vent tubes on the fantail of the tug. The line got hung up on those a couple of times.

The purpose of this system was to have a release in case the tug got into more than it could handle…however today it got used for another job. It became the sailboat, race course, buoy boat. I used it to drop off and retrieve the buoys and she performed this task very, very well.

Also the first time I took out the tug I had some pretty serious problems with getting a good signal to the tug. She was cutting on and off at only 25 yards. I found the solution by removing the antenna from inside the hull and routing it up inside the smoke stack. This gave it some height and a good signal for the receiver and is still completely hidden.

Another great day of sailing for Captain Sunshine and me, as seen here proudly posing with her racing yacht Crimson Tide.


Captain Slick
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Last edited by Capt.Crash; Jul 05, 2007 at 10:55 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 08:23 AM
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Bozeman, Montana, United States
Joined Aug 2003
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Very gratifying to use your tug for real work, isn't it :-). Placement And pickup of buoys is neat.

I like your quick release, I'll install one like yours when I get the tug back in the shop. A bit of sponge located below the tube would corral any drips that might get in. Most of the water on my deck comes from me splashing as I wade around the tug adjusting lines etc. You might consider pinching closed the barbs on your grapnel hook. I'd dull the points, too, to avoid scratching paint on your Schooner (could not tell from the photo, perhaps you've already filed them). Another hook, with longer arms, might be helpful for rescuing other boats; or you could use the toilet bowl float method (see the vac u boat/vac u tug site for details).

My current towline is floating flyline a)3 fathoms long,
b)has a float about a foot from the stern, along with the float on the hook,
c)has a weight of brass washers about 2 feet aft from the stern float.

The flyline's float and weight arrangement help ensure that the line will be sunk and clear the hull of my barges when I round up on them to pass the line underneath their hulls. Since the weight is so light, I can drag the line to the surface, if I choose, if I go fast with the tug.

The dangling bowline on the barge (that I attempt to snag with the hook) is about 15" long, lightly weighted with a couple small brass washers. More weight would make the snagged line less likely to pull free under tow. I leave the weight light so that the bowline does not anchor the barge in shallow water when I release it (I like it to drift offshore so I can then go rescue it).

Catch and release of barges is fun; if I circle clockwise to snag the barge, I find that circling counterclockwise and bumping the barge will usually free it from the hook, so I can go rescue it again. I have 2 barges tied in tandem. When the tieline is short, I can rescue the pair simply by shooting between them with the tug, skipping the towline. If the tieline is long, however, the shooting method does not work as I find that the tug often overuns the tieline and snarls it in the prop. Then it's time for the Kayak Rescue :-).
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Last edited by Brooks; Jul 05, 2007 at 08:41 AM.
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 09:27 AM
USA'd ex Brit
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Back.. In California
Joined Aug 2006
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" Captain Sunshine and the sailboats "

What? there are Sailboats?...
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 10:09 AM
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Millbrook, Alabama
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Brooks...

...yes it is great fun actually using the tug to do some meaningful work.

As for the hook...it was a very quick and dirty solution as I needed something to use immediately. I found an old saltwater treble hook and I did grind and file it nice and round and smooth to include the barbs. It is made of a very hard galvanized metal and is not very bendable. I will most likely not use this on the schooner, rather try a side snag of her shroud lines using some sort of smooth ended davit or "L" shaped arm so that I can get unhooked again.

The tug is lacking in thrust, and I don’t see her pulling that schooner anywhere. She may be able to assist her in a no wind situation though. Maybe a motor/gearbox/prop upgrade is in the tugs distant future.

I found that my hooked retrieval line needs to be about twice as long as it now is. I did run across the tow line once with no entanglement in the prop due to the excellent design of this tug and the tension on the line when I did it.

Captain Slick

"Always choose the lesser of the two weevils!"
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 10:20 AM
Grumpa Tom
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United States, CA, Los Angeles
Joined Sep 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toesup
" Captain Sunshine and the sailboats "

What? there are Sailboats?...
Yeah, I was looking for the sailboats too.
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 11:26 AM
Sea Dragon-Lover
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PDX, OR
Joined Dec 2002
9,826 Posts
The local Oregon Model Yacht Club races Thunder Tiger Victoria Class sailboats.
The look like simple kits, and looking over their boats, there are quite a few mods these guys make to their boats.

It looks like an easy kit to get in to sailing, and it is convenient to have an instant
venue in which to sail, and compete. I am not sure if other model yacht clubs race
this class, but it is worth checking before purchasing a sailboat.
I think it may be the "springer" of sailboats.

http://www.victoriarc.org/classclubs.htm
http://www.omyc.org/
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 08:23 PM
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Bozeman, Montana, United States
Joined Aug 2003
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You could predetermine the max wind your tug would be able to handle, in a manner similar to figuring out it's ability to haul the Schooner off the sandbank:
1. measure the bollard pull of the tug using a fisherman's scale.
2. measure the windage of the Schooner, ie it's pull on the fisherman's scale, when sitting at anchor at various wind speeds.
3. As long as the windage is less than the bollard pull, the tug should be able to handle the job.

The farther apart the 2 numbers are, the faster the tug will get the tug&schooner combo up to "hull" speed. The hull speed will be reached when the form drag of the 2 hulls plus the windage drag of the 2 boats equals the bollard pull. Once the the thrust and drag vectors are equal, no further acceleration is possible, for the mathematically inclined :-)

As you know, it takes very little force to move something floating in water. Even a pixy tug would be able to move your schooner in still air, provided you gave it enough time to accelerate the combo. The hull speed of the pixy tug combo would be less than that of your tug&schooner because the form drag and windage drag both increase with speed, and the equilibrium point would be lower for the pixy.

A long, slick hull like your schooner's should be towable with little force in still air, I would think. Anyone with a valuable sailboat like your's has an interest in rescue techniques. If you were to figure out the numbers and capability for tug and Schooner, I think we'd all be interested, particularly Phillip so he could put the info in his advertisements.
------------
Even if you find that the tow ablity of your tug is limited to light airs, I would not be too discouraged. Your tug may still perform useful rescue service. For instance, if you lost RC control of the Schooner, you could still sail the Schooner back home by using the tug to turn the Schooner on course by pushing on it's bow. Depending on the sail configuration when the RC crapped out, you might have to wear ship, rather than tack, with the tug's assistance. And your zigzag upwind might not be composed of equal angle legs if your squares are set (since they'd be aback for one set of legs). But even a sawtooth recovery course taking lots of time might be preferable to having to chase the ship downwind to a lee shore.
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Old Jul 05, 2007, 08:51 PM
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Bozeman, Montana, United States
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While on the subject of rescue, may I suggest that you install a marker buoy on your Schooner, with a line long enough to reach the surface of whatever water body you are traversing. The buoy could be a freely detaching fitting of some sort, something you'd normally find on deck. The line needn't be strong enough to haul the ship back to the surface, just something strong enough to support a buoy to let you know where to dive to recover the ship. Accidents happen: I read of a guy whose schooner was run down by a paddle boat - it remained floating, fortunately, but if it had sunk, a marker buoy would have been comforting, I bet.
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Old Jul 06, 2007, 07:52 AM
Is life for real?
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Almere The Netherlands
Joined Sep 2006
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Why Hoghappy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmot
Yeah, I was looking for the sailboats too.
It looks as if everybody is turning blind here, or HogHappy is just a lousy pic´s taker ...... but yeah huh......sailboats.......?
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Old Jul 06, 2007, 08:13 AM
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Millbrook, Alabama
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Brook...

...I continued this conversation over on the Prince de Neufchatel thread.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=262515

Captain Slick
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Old Jul 06, 2007, 08:50 AM
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Millbrook, Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkboo
It looks as if everybody is turning blind here, or HogHappy is just a lousy pic´s taker ...... but yeah huh......sailboats.......?


Enjoy...the Captain says she's going to beat me for posting that pic...

I guess I will take my punishment like the sailor I am...


Captain Slick

"Always choose the lesser of the two weevils!"
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Old Jul 06, 2007, 09:27 AM
Is life for real?
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Almere The Netherlands
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Capt´n Slick, LOL, there´s no other way but taking that punishment Eugčne
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Old Jul 06, 2007, 12:03 PM
no wings any more, just dust!
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stoke on trent
Joined Oct 2004
8,052 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooks
While on the subject of rescue, may I suggest that you install a marker buoy on your Schooner, with a line long enough to reach the surface of whatever water body you are traversing. The buoy could be a freely detaching fitting of some sort, something you'd normally find on deck. The line needn't be strong enough to haul the ship back to the surface, just something strong enough to support a buoy to let you know where to dive to recover the ship. Accidents happen: I read of a guy whose schooner was run down by a paddle boat - it remained floating, fortunately, but if it had sunk, a marker buoy would have been comforting, I bet.
when Celestia went down, I dived in straight after it and made my way over to it in a straight line, the guilty RC hover circling where she had gone under, tapped hull with feet and got a safe retrival
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