HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale
Reply
Thread Tools
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old Jul 25, 2007, 06:30 PM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2005
2,463 Posts
Delta Canard Covering

Today, the control surfaces were covered and the control horns installed. The horns were made by tracing around the front of the control surface rib pattern. The 1/16" holes were drilled in the horns at 1/2" from the bottom surface. my horns are made from 1/16" bass wood with the grain running with the horn length. Spruce would be tougher but there have been no failures so far. The top of the canard was covered and trimmed with red. The bottom of the main wing was covered and the servos were sanded and installed with canopy glue with balsa added to assure no movement. The transmitter was set for Delta and the servos plugged into the receiver per the schematic to assure correct allignment and ,movement before glueing in. Charles
canard addict is offline Find More Posts by canard addict
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 28, 2007, 01:15 PM
who has rabbit ears down
Captain Canardly's Avatar
United States, MN, Buffalo
Joined Jan 2007
3,594 Posts
Here ya go!http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...44#post7755522
Captain Canardly is online now Find More Posts by Captain Canardly
RCG Plus Member
Latest blog entry: Doin' What come naturally!
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2007, 11:14 AM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2005
2,463 Posts
Captain, Your glider really grooves! Do you have any sport canards? Charles
canard addict is offline Find More Posts by canard addict
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 29, 2007, 02:49 PM
who has rabbit ears down
Captain Canardly's Avatar
United States, MN, Buffalo
Joined Jan 2007
3,594 Posts
I'm working on a series of them- about 36-50" span, and an EDF.
Johnny
Captain Canardly is online now Find More Posts by Captain Canardly
RCG Plus Member
Latest blog entry: Doin' What come naturally!
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 30, 2007, 03:37 AM
Registered User
John235's Avatar
Sydney, Australia
Joined Mar 2006
1,315 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Canardly
I'm working on a series of them- about 36-50" span, and an EDF.
Johnny
I look forward to seeing your designs. Please keep us up to date with your progress. I think that EDF is especially interesting, since I am not such a fan of pusher props.
John235 is offline Find More Posts by John235
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 30, 2007, 09:15 AM
Xtreme Nut
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Joined Oct 2005
2,046 Posts
Here is an old Carnard Thermal Glider that was built from some magazine plans. It was built like back in 2001 and yet to be flown. Looks cool and I think this design has been 'copied' and advertised on RCG as the S1.
tIANcI is offline Find More Posts by tIANcI
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 30, 2007, 12:07 PM
who has rabbit ears down
Captain Canardly's Avatar
United States, MN, Buffalo
Joined Jan 2007
3,594 Posts
Sorry Dude, but that definately ain't no S1
Captain Canardly is online now Find More Posts by Captain Canardly
RCG Plus Member
Latest blog entry: Doin' What come naturally!
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2007, 02:27 PM
Indifferent User
pjwright's Avatar
Chattanooga
Joined Nov 2004
150 Posts
This looks similar to the slick looking slope soarer that tIANcI posted. It's DCRC's Tom Rankin from the May 1968 issue of Flying Models:
pjwright is offline Find More Posts by pjwright
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2007, 04:14 PM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2005
2,463 Posts
PJW and tIANcI, Thanks for the interesting contributions. There seemed to be lots of canard models from the 1970-1980 period. We could use more of them on the scene now to add variety and interest to our hobby.John 235, you mentioned that you did not care for a pusher prop. All of my models use the standard prop which is mounted "front forward" onto a motor which is turning in reverse. I would go for the EDF if it would give the needed thrust to get my planes into the air from a grass field but it seems that most EDF models need a launcher. They seem to get their power only after the speed has been attained. I suppose your canards will be built with low drag for speed? How are EDF's for aerobatics? Charles
canard addict is offline Find More Posts by canard addict
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2007, 05:08 PM
Dr John
pmpjohn's Avatar
Lake Placid, Florida
Joined Dec 2001
2,712 Posts
Charles,

In my opinion the difference between an EDF and any prop in a pusher configuration with regards to aerobatics is the prop will have the advantage in low speed thrust and throttle response. The big disadvantage for both pusher props and EDF when compared to a puller prop is that there is no propwash blowing over the control surfaces. You must keep some airspeed on to have good control authority.

John
pmpjohn is offline Find More Posts by pmpjohn
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2007, 05:25 PM
Registered User
John235's Avatar
Sydney, Australia
Joined Mar 2006
1,315 Posts
Its true that EDFs are difficult do setup properly, and are very poor efficiency compared to a pusher prop. I think its normal for the weight of a ducted fan system to be at least twice of a propeller with similar thrust. I think the ducted fan has two advantages:

1) Less chance of getting a propeller cut when hand launching.
2) No problems with propellor clearance for ROG takeoff.

But on the downside, I think there are a couple of issues that may be a problem for R.O.G takeoff. firstly, they relative lack of thrust. Second the problem of debris getting sucked through the DF system which I read should be avoided.
John235 is offline Find More Posts by John235
Last edited by John235; Jul 31, 2007 at 05:38 PM. Reason: Point 2 corrected.
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2007, 05:28 PM
Registered User
John235's Avatar
Sydney, Australia
Joined Mar 2006
1,315 Posts
Charles, I am guessing that you reason that I prefer fast flying models because I prefer semi-symetrical airfoil sections. That isn't really the reason. Although I would say that increased stall speed is a downside, a plane with 12-14oz wing loading will hardly be a pylon racer anyway. For models with low wing-loadings, semi-symetrical sections seem to give a wider range of speed, certinaly they tend not to have the pitch trim problems when flying at higher speeds which normally requires lots of downthust. Inverted flight is obvioulsy going to be much easier. For landing I think that even a fully symetrical section can be a help, because it allows a much steeper landing approach, whereas, if a highly cambered section is used, you can sometimes end up with a model that wants to keep gliding forever. I built these models before, especially in the days of round cells and brushed motors when you needed to make electric models very efficient to get good performance. Now the power of electic models is comparable with IC models, I tend to adopt airfoil sections that are thinner versions of those that are normally used on typical sport type IC engine models.
John235 is offline Find More Posts by John235
Reply With Quote
Old Aug 01, 2007, 07:27 PM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2005
2,463 Posts
PMPJohn, That's a good point about the prop wash effect. It helps to have that for the stall turn and tail dragger take off steering. I did some stall turns with my Egret canard with the rudder up front and had to hit the rudder while there was still some speed. John235, I sensed that you love speed because of the EDF interest. I have had models with semi symetrical airfoils which were excellent for slow flying. They are great for inverted flight and outside loops. I have these on a Four Star 40 and FS 20 scratch built. The models weigh 3.2 and 2.0 pounds and are gentle flyers. So far, my five own design balsa canard models have used the flat bottom airfoil because I do not want to change my basic configuration except for coupling and wing shape. I have converted five ARF foamies into canards without learning much because most of them fly well. I believe my Electro Streak was fully symetrical and was sold because it was too fast. Charles
canard addict is offline Find More Posts by canard addict
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools