HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale
Reply
Thread Tools
Old Oct 03, 2006, 11:35 PM
Registered User
Joined Sep 2006
6 Posts
Discussion
Looking for some guidance

Hey guys, I'm pretty new here and I've been reading a lot. At first, I didn't really want to post or anything, because I knew I'd be asking the same questions that you guys must hear day after day. I'll take a chance though, hopefully you won't mind.

Anyways, I'm looking for a 'real' plane, something to have fun with. I know that's a broad category, but I'm not quite sure how to narrow it down more. I downloaded FMS to get a feel for things, and after a few flights I'm used to the control reversal stuff. I downloaded a lot of models to play with, some are much more resonsive than others, but that's fine with me.

Back to the planes, I see you guys like to recommend the easyStar to new 'pilots' (for lack of better word). At first I thought that the easystar was just I needed, but it just seems....so slow I guess. Now I read a thread a few days back complaining about newbies coming in and complaining that their planes had crashed, obviously their fault. I know that I shouldn't get a FAST plane as a first plane, but I'd like something a little faster than the easystar, something that I can grow with.

I saw some people recommending the Parkzone Superstar, which looks like a great plane to me. I don't have any radio equipment, so it would have to be a RTF, but this plane seems like something that would fit me. Is starting out on a 4 channel difficult? Can I just use the rudder or ailerons individually until I get the hang of it? Are there any better planes out there in this price range? The main reason I'm straying from the easystar is that I wouldn't be able to buy a new plane for a while, and I'm looking for something I can use for a while...
Anyways, thanks for reading, if you have any questions about MY questions or about me, please ask.

Alex
fizzyalex is offline Find More Posts by fizzyalex
Reply With Quote
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old Oct 03, 2006, 11:53 PM
Registered User
Major Justice's Avatar
Kentucky
Joined Sep 2006
265 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by fizzyalex
Hey guys, I'm pretty new here and I've been reading a lot. At first, I didn't really want to post or anything, because I knew I'd be asking the same questions that you guys must hear day after day. I'll take a chance though, hopefully you won't mind.

Anyways, I'm looking for a 'real' plane, something to have fun with. I know that's a broad category, but I'm not quite sure how to narrow it down more. I downloaded FMS to get a feel for things, and after a few flights I'm used to the control reversal stuff. I downloaded a lot of models to play with, some are much more resonsive than others, but that's fine with me.

Back to the planes, I see you guys like to recommend the easyStar to new 'pilots' (for lack of better word). At first I thought that the easystar was just I needed, but it just seems....so slow I guess. Now I read a thread a few days back complaining about newbies coming in and complaining that their planes had crashed, obviously their fault. I know that I shouldn't get a FAST plane as a first plane, but I'd like something a little faster than the easystar, something that I can grow with.

I saw some people recommending the Parkzone Superstar, which looks like a great plane to me. I don't have any radio equipment, so it would have to be a RTF, but this plane seems like something that would fit me. Is starting out on a 4 channel difficult? Can I just use the rudder or ailerons individually until I get the hang of it? Are there any better planes out there in this price range? The main reason I'm straying from the easystar is that I wouldn't be able to buy a new plane for a while, and I'm looking for something I can use for a while...
Anyways, thanks for reading, if you have any questions about MY questions or about me, please ask.

Alex

Attributes of beginner planes are usually Flat Bottom, High Wing, w/ some Dihedral. It is a lot harder to get such a plane inverted just because it wasn't built for that. The lower the wing, the more acrobatic. High Wings can be plenty acrobatic, if they have a fully symmetrical wing.

This topic is discussed at length in most posts on this particular forum.

The Superstar looks like a Flat Bottom with some Dihedral. It's Gas powered, and this is an electric forum. It's also 249$ at http://www.wholesaletrains.com/Detai...p?ID=200408923
Major Justice is offline Find More Posts by Major Justice
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 01:02 AM
CSI
I promise, just ONE more order
CSI's Avatar
Del Rio Intl, Texas, United States
Joined Feb 2004
3,983 Posts
Alex,
First off, welcome to our forums. I hope you get as much help, satisfaction, and make good friends just like most of us do. This is a great place.
Now, you said you have been reading all the posts around here....I find it hard to believe considering you just asked the same question that was asked by at least 30 guys this week alone. There is no tailor made plane for each of us. You just have to pick what you like. We have literally posted our fingers to the bone this week discussing this very topic...how we suggest what a good first plane might be. I'm not trying to be a butt on this, it's just frustrating how much time I, and several others spent this past week answering this question.
Right off the bat, you go right to the age old statement...I don't want it too slow, I want something to grow with, etc, etc. Then you turn around and say you don't have much money to invest.
Here's what ruffles us up: We try and try to point these facts out, but feel we are banging our heads against the brick wall.
---we say get a slower model because it gives you the best chance to learn and minimizes the chances of major crash damage that might either do major damage or complete destruction. BUT, You want a faster plane...ok, now you risk it all and have a large chance of having major destruction, so this leaves you back to not having a plane. This won't help you learn since you won't have anything to fly.
---you fly a sim and have it all figured out...control reversal, power control, speeds, hand/eye coordination, etc. So, now you are ready to handle more speed, more aerobatics. You said you don't want to end up bored. YET, most everyone here keeps saying over and over how many crashes you WILL encounter. They all used the sims too. It is NOT as easy as it looks, and no sim is going to get you that prepared, although yes, they do help. Still, look at all the crash reports around here.
---you want something that looks like a real plane. OF course, that's what the rest all said. That nice looking plane will only look that way for the first few seconds of its lifetime, then its going to look like a scraped, glue dripping, chunked up pile of foam or wood. We keep saying to get a real trainer that is very basic, strong, light wing loading, high wing, rear facing prop preferred, 3 channel. Oh, I forgot, you want to jump right to 4 channels. Didn't you read those 20 or so threads saying the same thing? Half of them ask if they can just tape the ailerons or rudder down. No, it dosen't work that way. This has been answered very clearly this week. A 4 channel plane is built to turn with ailerons. It will not do well trying to turn with only rudder. The reverse can work sometimes though...you can add ailerons to a 3 channel, rudder plane to make it 4 channels.

Ok, Again, I'm not trying to be a know it all turd, and I know it sounds that way. I apologize. I have typed my fingers raw this week trying to get all these answers out there to new guys that are just starting up. Still, you all say you have read for "hours and hours" yet ask the exact same questions. It just gets frustrating to keep re typing it all. I know you want individual attention...we all do, so I understand. If you had done any reading here at all, then you would already know that the majority are going to say forget all those desires you wrote and go with the proven planes and equipment. It appears that you just want someone to give you the ok to get what you want. Yes, there are a few who will do that. They are either the group who will say it, then sit back and snicker at you when you come back to post how you destroyed your first model, OR the group who were actually very lucky and did get away with only minor crashes and didn't end up totally destroying that first model, giving them enough time to learn before it just couldn't be repaired any more.
You want the perfect answer: as posted so many times this week.....get to the Hobby Lobby website and get an order in quick for that Wing Dragon. Better hurry because it won't be on sale much longer...maybe already gone off sale. It's a bit quicker plane that a lot of trainers, fairly stable, but can do some nice basic aerobatics. VERY STRONG, can take a good beating. Pretty good size so it is easier to see. Can upgrade it with better radio gear, brushless motors, easily holds lipo batteries. can fly a long sortie....
It's a darn good plane to learn on. It's even better because it's at a GREAT price.
I hope you get the answers to all your questions here, and learn to be a good RC pilot. It takes time and patience to really learn this. Don't expect to just take your new plane out to the field, toss it up and get a great sortie. You will be crashing the heck out of it as you learn. Mistakes are made all the time, even the most experienced will have a dumb-thumb moment! Please only try to take what I've said in the light that it was intended...to help you enter our hobby with the best chance for success. Read back through the posts for the past 2 weeks if you can. I wish you all the success you can have.
Ken
CSI is offline Find More Posts by CSI
RCG Plus Member
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 01:10 AM
Suspended Account
Joined Jul 2006
22,991 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by fizzyalex
...At first I thought that the easystar was just I needed, but it just seems....so slow I guess.... Now I read a thread a few days back complaining about newbies coming in and complaining that their planes had crashed, obviously their fault. I know that I shouldn't get a FAST plane as a first plane, but I'd like something a little faster than the easystar, something that I can grow with.
Alex
Hi Alex,

First off, I'm a newbie myself, so I can only address some of your questions. I started with a Firebird Freedom (BAD IDEA). It flew 28 mph I think the specs said. Now here's the thing, that might seem slow at first, but you have to realize that's about 40 feet per second. Consider that every action you take with those sticks is going to go like this...

"Hey my plane is banked too hard, crap, I gotta turn it... oops, wrong way, dangit... now it's going the other way too much and it's heading toward the ground... OH NO...it's heading for the trees ..I better do something now... hurry, try to remember what to do when it's coming at me.... why is it constantly leaning so hard to the left... I must have bumped my trim levers... I'll pull back this lever and make it climb... dammit, it just flipped back over on itself... Ahhhhh thank God it smashed into the ground and didn't fly away from me.. etc, etc. etc."

In the meantime that rocket ship up there is covering a football field every 7 seconds. And when ya don't know what the heck you're doing, your hands and brain are going to be taxed like ya wouldnt believe.

So if you want something with 4 channels that goes a lot faster, then go for it. Maybe you'll be one of the 1% of rc pilots who just fly like an old pro right from the start.

I got my Slo-V after the Firebird Freedom Fiasco, learned to fly it... upgraded it with a brushless inrunner motor (and I have another Slo-V with an outrunner on it) and then got a Tiger Moth... and now I'm getting my very first aileron plane.

Fight the urge...do it the RIGHT way... baby steps with dorky looking planes... then gradually getting the ones the big guys fly.

Chuck
NoFlyZone is offline Find More Posts by NoFlyZone
Reply With Quote  (Disabled)
Old Oct 04, 2006, 01:16 AM
Registered User
Joined Sep 2006
608 Posts
Personally I recommend getting a slow plane. It's not going to seem slow at all to you as a beginner. You're going to crash. Get something that will take a lot of abuse.

Quote:
The main reason I'm straying from the easystar is that I wouldn't be able to buy a new plane for a while, and I'm looking for something I can use for a while.
You'll be able to use the Easy Star for awhile, or so I've heard. The SuperStar could be a bundle of sticks 10 seconds into your flight. It's also probably harder to repair - it's not made of foam.

If you want something that's going to last you awhile, don't go with the SuperStar.

Personally, I recommend the Wing Dragon. I'm a beginner and I learned with it. I love the plane. It's definitely fast enough for someone just starting out, and it's something that will take loads of abuse. It's easily repairable. It's also only $90. So you can spend just some that money you were going to spend on the SuperStar on the Wing Dragon, and then have quite a bit left over that you can go and spend on a fast plane.

I got an F27C Stryker as my next plane after my Wing Dragon. It was $260 RTF, less if you get it Plug & Play. It's pretty quick - not really really catch-on-fire-from-friction-fast - but for beginner like me it has plenty of speed. The box says it goes 80mph. I don't have a radar gun so I can't confirm anything, but I've heard someone on this forum got it to go 117mph in a dive.
The L is offline Find More Posts by The L
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 01:47 AM
Crash tester
Drunkskunk's Avatar
Texas
Joined Sep 2006
850 Posts
Lets clear this up, did you mean the Hobbyco Superstar, or the Parkzone Super Cub?
The Superstar is a gas trainer made of sticks, the Super Cub is a Z foam Electric.

Yes, the Parkzone Super Cub is a good trainer. it would be better as a second plane, after learning on a plane like the Easystar.

The Hobbyco Superstar would only be good if you plan to have an Instructor help you with every flight for the first few months. Gas balsa planes are tricky and in this case, the Idea of "trainer" is to have someone training you
Drunkskunk is offline Find More Posts by Drunkskunk
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 03:06 AM
CSI
I promise, just ONE more order
CSI's Avatar
Del Rio Intl, Texas, United States
Joined Feb 2004
3,983 Posts
Hey Chuck, that was a good, first hand description of what it's like out there in the jungle! Some good advice from someone who's been there recently.
Hey L, I have seen your threads about the Stryker. You provide a good piece of evidence showing how things can be when done right. You started with planes that could teach you the basics, then were able to transfer that info over to a hotter plane that could provide a good challenge to most anybody. Nice job showing a logical approach to things.
Skunk, nice joby helping to clear things up. I am certainly not a big fan of jumping out there with just any old plane and letting it rip. We need to compare different planes and what strengths and weaknesses they posess, and also things to look for that make one plane better than another. Clarifying issues around these planes can only help since they come up often in these beginner threads.
I've settled down! Shouldn't take things so serious I guess. I enjoy this hobby tremedously and hate to see anyone new to it jeopardize their potential by getting bad information or wrong equipment. Both of these things have driven guys away from this hobby in the past, and I feel strongly about avoiding this.
Happy flying to all of you.
Ken
CSI is offline Find More Posts by CSI
RCG Plus Member
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 03:21 AM
Registered User
Christchurch, New Zealand
Joined Jun 2006
6,794 Posts
Take note too... there's several kinds of beginners, and you see posts like 'heli guy wants to get into planes'... and it turns out he flies 3D on his r/c heli and has a fullsize commercial license too. Well, obviously the advice for that guy is going to be different than the right advice for a complete beginner to flying. If you're a complete beginner to flying, ignore those threads because they just don't apply to you.
Andrew McGregor is offline Find More Posts by Andrew McGregor
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 03:41 AM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
United States, CA, Tehachapi
Joined Nov 2005
24,918 Posts
This might help.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=577137
Murocflyer is offline Find More Posts by Murocflyer
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 06:50 AM
Registered User
United States, PA, Butler
Joined Jun 2006
1,003 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoFlyZone
Fight the urge...do it the RIGHT way... baby steps with dorky looking planes... then gradually getting the ones the big guys fly.
Just wanted to say, as a 3 week old new "pilot" to a just coming in new "pilot", those planes may look "dorky" when looking at them to buy or sitting on the workbench before it's maiden flight, but they no longer look "dorky" when it's up in the air on your first RC flight with the grin sporting on your face from ear to ear.

Listen to what these guys say. They are the experienced. I searched and read and searched and read information here before I bought my first plane. EasyStar was my first choice, but nicked due to cash restraints. I chose the Aerobird Challenger (ABC) and I'm loving it (www.diversionhobbies.com - $109.99 with free extra 1000mah battery, prop, and shipping). The Wing Dragon is the other one I was looking at, but it wasn't on sale for $89 when I bought my ABC. Just missed that price I think.

They may not look fast flying in the middle of a big field, but they definitely perceptionally increase speed tremendously when heading for that tree or other obstruction.

When you do get whatever plane you get, don't do anything but let it gently climb to a good high altitude and glide around. Small movements on the sticks and don't hold the sticks in a bank very long. Just move and let go, move and let go. You do this for your first flights and it doesn't take long to learn the control and soon you are whipping it around in tight turns and moving on to learn more stuff.

I posted this pic as an attachment in another thread, but the compression messed it up. This is where I fly in the field in the back yard.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b7...k83/Image3.jpg
Note the big blue circle. It's where I spent the first week with my plane just gliding around at around 500+ feet of altitude. The small green circle is where I spent the 2nd week at low altitude of 10-20 feet. This is much harder to fly like that. This is when I started crashing my bird (which takes a substantial beating and keeps on going). The little narrow field noted by the green arrows going across and back I like to zip through. That is very hard for someone new to RC (meaning me ) and where the tree started to grab the plane from the air. Those trees will jump out and grab it when you least expect it, hehe.

Another thing I've noticed as a newbie is that depth perception is difficult to judge. You can see in that pic where at the right edge of my green low alt. flying circle there is the woods line and the road. On the edge of the field before the road is the powerlines. I've hit them several times buzzing a flyby past me, increasing throttle and climb to bank around right there thinking I would be clear of them. I've also folded a wing for the 2nd time last night doing rolls at higher altitude thinking the plane was above closer to me. Ended up walking quite a ways to recover the downed plane, much farther than I thought I would. My first wing fold, I thought it was above my house when infact it ended up in the back yard of the house across the road and 3 houses down (both folds were from rolling attempts). Keep that distance perception in perspective when you fly for the first time.

So, a quick summary of my suggestion is to listen to these guys about what plane to get and start out just gliding around at a high altitude to get use to it. Get one with nice glide charactoristics. Altitude is your friend. Also, make sure you check the plane before each flight session, after each crash, and cut the throttle if you see you are going to crash.

Good luck and have fun. You won't even think about that plane being an ugly plane when you get it up in the air for the first time. And, FWIW, I've read plenty here that say they still enjoy their Aerobird/Wing Dragon/EasyStar a long time after they have moved on to their 2nd, 3rd, or 4th plane. They make great aerial photography platforms.

Mike
mrodgers is online now Find More Posts by mrodgers
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 07:35 AM
Registered User
Joined Sep 2006
6 Posts
I'm not sure to say here, but I'll cover my points in order

Quote:
It's Gas powered, and this is an electric forum. It's also 249$ at
http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...=LXJKU3**&P=ML
With all due respect, it doesn't look gas powered to me.

See this is where I thought you guys would go wrong, you wouldn't read my entire post. Many of your points I never said or meant. I never said I didn't like foam planes, or that they're ugly. I know I'll crash often, why are you questioning this?

Thank you The L and NoFlyZone, for that advice. I think that's what I missed, that I didn't know how fast these planes really got.

Thank you everyone else for your advice, I'll come back here after a little bit.
fizzyalex is offline Find More Posts by fizzyalex
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 01:31 PM
Registered User
Major Justice's Avatar
Kentucky
Joined Sep 2006
265 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by fizzyalex
I'm not sure to say here, but I'll cover my points in order



http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...=LXJKU3**&P=ML
With all due respect, it doesn't look gas powered to me.

See this is where I thought you guys would go wrong, you wouldn't read my entire post. Many of your points I never said or meant. I never said I didn't like foam planes, or that they're ugly. I know I'll crash often, why are you questioning this?

Thank you The L and NoFlyZone, for that advice. I think that's what I missed, that I didn't know how fast these planes really got.

Thank you everyone else for your advice, I'll come back here after a little bit.
Yes, that plane is electric. The link I gave was a gas powered one though. The same plane, different engine. Didn't mean to confuse you, just what came up when I searched.
Major Justice is offline Find More Posts by Major Justice
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 02:59 PM
Registered User
Joined Sep 2006
8 Posts
Hi. I am also a beginner, and have been flying the Super Cub for about a month now. this is a very durable plane, and there is virtually nothing you can do to it that CA and packing tape won't fix. Like others have said-you will crash, and many times. This plane keeps a licking and keeps on ticking.
Just get plenty of props to go with it. Highly reccommended.
mark4965 is offline Find More Posts by mark4965
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 04:58 PM
Registered User
Joined Sep 2006
6 Posts
thanks mark, was it your first plane?
fizzyalex is offline Find More Posts by fizzyalex
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 04, 2006, 05:30 PM
Registered User
Los Angeles, CA
Joined Feb 2006
399 Posts
seriously, save yourself a lot of grief and get the easy star.
Luisfc1972 is offline Find More Posts by Luisfc1972
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for some scale kits.....Links would be GREAT! Chris Rust Scale Kit/Scratch Built 6 Dec 06, 2001 10:11 PM
im looking for some good f-16c cross sections... i-fly Power Systems 1 Oct 21, 2001 02:54 PM
Looking for some online clips of pylon racing Foxtrot Electric Plane Talk 9 Jul 26, 2001 10:38 PM
Looking for some good e-zone advice Woody Electric Plane Talk 2 Jun 03, 2001 09:49 PM