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Old Aug 25, 2006, 05:51 AM
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Barges

Hello,

I was wondering what the best way to make a barge hull is? Is blue foam a good idea, or balsa? Also, is there some putty stuff you guys put on and sand?

Any pictures of barges would also be appreciated - I'm thinking of making one in 1/24, but 8ins wide and 1ft long.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 06:25 AM
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Xiaoshan, China
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What type of barge?

What type of barge are you wanting to build?

Here are several types that you can chose from among the many available on Google.
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Last edited by herrmill; Aug 25, 2006 at 06:31 AM.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 06:28 AM
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Hi Hermill,

Sorry I didn't specify - like the 55.0 KB one.

Thanks,
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 07:47 AM
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US bulk cargo barge

That is a typical bulk cargo barge used on most US waterways. Having lived on the Ohio River, I've crawled over a few of them as a boy.

You may want to look at the Dumas kit that offers both one raked bow & one box barge that matches their American Beauty tow boat kit. Both the barge & the tow boat links are shown below along with photos from their site.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=5686878

http://www.dumasestore.com/catalog/p...roducts_id=198
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 08:16 AM
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A 1:24 barge 8"x12" would be more of a rigging flat. A standard size barge is 195' x 35' and 200' x 35' which is 1:24 scale would be 100" x 17 1/2" for the 200 footer.

Smaller barges are the short barges that go into unit tows which are usually 145' long. Also there the rigging flats I mentioned which can range from 12' up to 40'. There's crane flats averaging from 30' to 200' and various speciality barges that can range anywhere from 30' to 640'.

Here's some more examples for you.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 08:36 AM
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Western N.Y. winemaking country
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Hi Joe,

Well, Dr. 5euss asked the right question of the right guy, as you and River Bill are as in the know on these things as anybody.

Making a barge is as easy as making a box, or you can get fancy on the ends and ramp them up a bit, put skegs on, etc.

Besides Dumas, Microglass makes a fiberglass generic version, 36" long by about 9" wide that will fit many applications.

Probably the best bet is to get some doorskin plywood, and some epoxy, and just be creative.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 08:43 AM
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I would use bass wood to frame up the hull and place sheet foam in it after sealing the wood with a sealer ( just in case you ever got a leak)

See if this will work for what you're looking for.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 08:50 AM
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Flatwoods, KY
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You're right there kapitan. It's always a good idea to make a convertible deck when you're building only one barge so you can convert it into different types of barges.

I built a pallet of oil drums that I lift from my AmClyde crane deck over to other boat decks and the adults seem to be intriged by it more than the kids.

One thing about barges. You can build anything and somewhere out there I'm sure you can find something close to what you created.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 08:54 AM
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Wow, thanks for all the replies !

That plan seems good. I've just nipped out and bought some thin balsa and thicker stuff for the supports. I'll let you know how I get on!

Thanks,
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 09:11 AM
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Hi,

Did/do some barges have flat ends? I think it would be easier for my first build.

Also, if it's 8 inches wide, how 'tall' does it need to be?

Thanks,
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 10:47 AM
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Quesion for TBJoe

I built four 1/48 scale "box" barges to use together as a tow. They are 35 x 145 scale ft (8.75" x 36"). Two have the upward slanted bow/front deck and two are plain box ends. They have double bollards at each of the four corners.
Some questions, please. How are the barges lashed together? Also, I don't have a towboat, but a regular "pointed" bow, 98 scale ft tug. Does that type of tug ever push tows? How are they rigged if they do?

I'll post the barge pics and some construction notes if anyone is interested.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanL
I built four 1/48 scale "box" barges to use together as a tow. They are 35 x 145 scale ft (8.75" x 36"). Two have the upward slanted bow/front deck and two are plain box ends. They have double bollards at each of the four corners.
Some questions, please. How are the barges lashed together? Also, I don't have a towboat, but a regular "pointed" bow, 98 scale ft tug. Does that type of tug ever push tows? How are they rigged if they do?

I'll post the barge pics and some construction notes if anyone is interested.
This may help...Barge CAD interactive
Barges are lashed together with steel cables, chain, ratchets and big steel bars to beat upon the equipment (toothpicks). Pointy tugs almost NEVER push the barges, but the do come up on the sides for a hip tow in tight quarters or in harbors. The bow of the tug points ~20-30 degrees into the centerline of the barge. Rear spring line, forward bow backing line, and stern line are the minimum attachments to the barge. One of us must have a picture of this arrangement somewhere.
Edit found it. Here is a nice overview of towing too.
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Last edited by Boatfox; Aug 25, 2006 at 11:08 AM.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 11:46 AM
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Western N.Y. winemaking country
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towboatjoe said:

"You're right there kapitan. It's always a good idea to make a convertible deck when you're building only one barge so you can convert it into different types of barges.

I built a pallet of oil drums that I lift from my AmClyde crane deck over to other boat decks and the adults seem to be intriged by it more than the kids.

One thing about barges. You can build anything and somewhere out there I'm sure you can find something close to what you created."

Yes Joe, it's a good idea to make them versatile

On barge sizes, I built one about 15 years ago that was 8 3/4" by 35 1/2"", which was just the right size to carry a 12-pack of beer, the cans laying side by side crosswise. The beer, of course, was just there to ballast it down---.

It was pushed by a little 15" utility tug, which I still have, but the barge is now down in New Zealand being used as a video camera float. I still have the mold, and the barge shell is available from Microglass.

Karl
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 12:08 PM
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Boatfox...Thank you!

Great info! The one and two barge rigs are perfect for my tug. It has an operating rear winch that can be used for the stern line.
Does one tug ever take up to four barges? How might that be rigged?
What if anything is used between the barges to buffer them and prevent metal-on-metal contact?

der kap - great idea for ballast!!!!!!
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 12:15 PM
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Decide on type of barge as they vary so much depending on what kind of service they are seeing. River barges tend to be shallower than an ocean going ( can draft up to 30') . Some of the barges do have flat ends--depends on the usage. Good ratio for a barge is 4 to 1 for most applications. Build it to be handled like a barge so it should be able to handle abuse.
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