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Great Planes ElectriFly Yak 55 EP Nearly Indestructible FlightFlex Foamie ARF Review

Jim Young finds that Great Planes has sucessfully combined crash resistance, unique materials (the fuse ZIPPERS!) and classic construction techniques with strong 3D flight characteristics in the YAK-55!

Splash

Introduction

Okay Larry, it's my turn!
Okay Larry, it's my turn!
Wingspan:34.5"
Wing Area:369 sq. in.
Weight:16 to 17 oz.
Weight as tested:17.2 oz.
Length:38"
Wing Loading:6.2 to 6.6 oz/sq. ft.
Wing Loading as tested:6.7 oz/sq. ft.
Servos:4 Futaba 3110 Micro Servos
Receiver:Futaba R114F 4 channel micro receiver
Battery:ElectriFly 3S 1500mAhr Pack with SafeCharge
Motor:370 Ball Bearing Motor, 5:1 ball bearing gearbox & 11x4.5 prop (all incl!)
ESC:ElectriFly C-25, 25A Controller
Manufacturer:Great Planes

The Great Planes YAK-55 is the latest release in Great Planes line of FlightFlex park flyers. I am always a bit skeptical about planes designed to withstand crashes. Usually when a plane is designed to crash well, that is all it does do well. I am pleased to report that this is not the case with the YAK-55. Not only is the YAK-55 a durable plane, it is a capable 3D model with the stock power system.

What is FlightFlex? Most types of foam used in park flyers are rigid and brittle. In a crash they typically crack or dent. FlightFlex on the other hand is very flexible and resilient. The closest thing I could compare it to would be carpet padding, but much thinner, lighter, larger air pockets, and quite a bit stiffer. It is not as stiff as say Depron, so you can't make a flat plate foamie with it. So, Great Planes has used traditional construction methods to use this new material.

Kit Contents

The YAK-55 is a typical Great Planes kit in that is comes very complete. Opening the box you'll find just about everything you'll need to complete it, minus the radio, ESC, and battery pack. Everything arrived well packed in plastic bags and taped to the inside of the box.

Highlights:

  • The rudder is pre-hinged.
  • The fuse has a zipper for access to the radio compartment. Yes, a zipper!
  • A stick type mount is already fixed in place for a clean motor installation.
  • Complete hardware package.
  • The stab is very thin, with 3-D size elevators for extreme control authority.
  • All of the control surfaces feature a tough plastic coating on both sides as stiffener.
  • The wing features a symmetrical airfoil.
  • Under the FlightFlex skin I could feel a traditional built structure of FlightFlex and carbon.
  • There are several wing ribs and a few carbon spars for stiffness.

This was a nice combination of traditional construction methods and space-age materials.

Included 370 motor and pre-installed gearbox features:

  • ball bearings on both,
  • high performance motor brushes,
  • powerful motor magnets
  • quality gold plated connectors pre-installed
  • motor bypass capacitors installed,
  • 5:1 gear ratio
  • brass pinion & plastic main gear pre-installed.

What you need to add

  • Micro Receiver
  • Two 6" Servo Extensions
  • Two 12" Servo Extensions (16" if you have short servo leads)
  • Four Micro (9g) Servos
  • Servo "Y" Harness (if ganging the aileron servos to one channel)
  • 25 Amp Brushed ESC
  • 1250mAhr to 1500mAhr 3S LiPo pack

I used an ElectriFly C-25 ESC and a 3S 1500mAhr Li-Po pack. You need the 25A ESC more because, unlike a typical flat foamie, it will be riding in the fuse which is basically insulation. If you want to mount the ESC to the side of the fuse or in the motor compartment, you may be able to get by with a smaller ESC, as the current draw is in the 10A range, but you still need to drive 4 servos. The C-25 is a good mate to this plane because it comes with mating connectors for the ones installed on the motor. Dean's Ultra connectors come installed on the battery pack and C-25, so it is a snap hooking everything up.

ElectriFly Accessories

ElectriFly Li-Po Batteries with SafeCharge

The ElectriFly Li-Po packs with SafeCharge feature two connectors: one for high current discharging and one for 1C rate charging. Built into each pack is the SafeCharge circuit that monitors each cells voltage and cuts off the charging process if any one cell's voltage exceeds 4.28V. It does not provide any balancing feature, but does add an element of safety to the charging process. The charging connector is a standard JST, 2-pin connector and the discharge connector is a Dean's Ultra.

ElectriFly C-25 Brushed ESC

The C-25 is a nice brushed controller for 2 or 3 Li-Po cells. It features a 1.5A BEC and a 1.3kHz switching frequency. It comes complete with a Dean's Ultra plug on the input, two gold plated plugs on the output, 3 bypass capacitors for the motor, double sided mounting tape, and some heat shrink tubing. The ESC is very compact and has heat sink plates on both sides and uses good quality wire.

The ESC is powered up with a push button switch. The switch features two LEDs (pretty cool for such a small package) that display the status of the controller. The red LED is for the power, and the blue LED blinks the Low Voltage Cutoff setting. There are two parameters that can be programmed; the Low Voltage cutoff and the brake. Holding the button down for 4-5 seconds puts you in a mode to select NiCd/NiMH or 2 to 4 Li-Po cells for the LVC. Holding the button down for 2-3 seconds saves your selection. When the ESC is powered up, the motor will beep three times. To arm the ESC the throttle stick must be moved to full throttle and the motor will beep 5 (brake on) or 7(brake off) times. Moving the throttle stick back to off finishes the arming process. If in this process the throttle stick is left at full for 5 seconds, the brake setting will be toggled.

Assembly Materials

  • LOW Temperature Hot Melt Glue
  • Foam Safe CA
  • Thin CA
  • Hobby Knife
  • Thread Locker

I tried a few different adhesives while putting this kit together, and I would highly recommend using low temperature hot melt glue. It really speeds along the assembly and bonds well to the FlightFlex material. Also, when using hot melt glue, the FlightFlex material will melt a bit as well. So, I basically ended up welding things together, giving a very strong bond. I did try a bit of high temperature hot melt glue, but it melted the FlightFlex material too much.

I tried a few different adhesives while putting this kit together, and I would highly recommend using low temperature hot melt glue.

Assembly

The 15 page manual has many B&W photos and check off boxes to aid in assembly. I followed it in sequence and had few problems with the assembly. There are several "expert tips" along the way to help you get familiar with using hot melt glue and working with the FlightFlex material. Overall the assembly was straight forward, and the manual was very clear. Since this model's materials are different than most, I'll outline the assembly as well as suggest a few things here.

The assembly starts by hot gluing in the stab. The hardest part of this was keeping it square to the tail. Since you can re-melt the hot glue with the tip of the gun you can make adjustments as you go. The wing is glued in place next.

Pin hinges are supplied for the ailerons and they are hot glued in place. There are precut slots for the hinges, but a few of them were off center so I took the time to cut a new slot. Be careful here not to use too much glue, or you can end up with a bulge around the hinge.

The elevator halves are hinged and joined next. A carbon rod fits into hinge tubes pre-installed in the stab. The rod was a bit tight in the tubes, but a couple swipes with a file loosened it up. With the rod in place, each elevator half is hot glued to it. You don't have to worry about being too neat in this step. Any excess hot glue is easily trimmed away after it cools. When you are finished you have a full deflection hinge with no slop.

Next, the servos are glued in place and control horns are installed. I used 4 Futaba 3110 servos. These are really nice 9g servos. They center well, have plenty of power, and don't seem to hum like HS-55s. The control horns are part of a complete, light weight control hook-up. For each control horn a 3/4" slot is cut in the control surface and the horn and a back plate are glued in place with thin, foam-safe CA. The manual is very clear here, and there are measurements and photos to help locate each horn.

The only problem I had with the control hook-up was inserting the plastic "z-bend" clevises into the control horns. The manual tells you to trim the inside of the hole in the control horn to ease installation. This is good advise. If the fit is too tight, you risk breaking the clevis ends. What I found was that if the clevis didn't slip in with little force, I needed ream out the hole some more! I was worried that there would be too much slop if I made the hole too large, but when they slip in easily the control is still very tight.

Great Planes has included long servo arms for just about any brand of servo. These control arms accept the same "z-bend" as the control horns. With the control arms and control surfaces centered, a carbon rod is secured in place with a drop of thin CA. I found it helped to stretch out the z-bends for the rods with a large T-pin. This made it easier to insert the carbon rods. The rods are a bit flexible, and probably add to the overall crash resistance of the model.

The motor/gearbox assembly slips on the stick mount and a single screw hold it in place. The FlightFlex cowl slips over the front of the fuselage and is held in place with a few dots of hot melt glue.

A prop-saver type hub is secured to the gearbox output shaft. There are two diameter hubs, so make sure to have the proper size pointing forward. The hub is secured in place with two screws (that double to hold the O-ring) and a drop of thread locker. The propeller included is an 11"x4.5" slow fly type and it is secured with one of the supplied O-rings. The propeller is undercambered and has tiplets, something I had not seen before on a propeller.

Radio and Power Setup

The radio setup is straight forward and is covered in detail in the manual. The aileron servo linkages are setup with a bit of differential. I would recommend using the second hole from the end on all the servo arms, since you can still get over 45 degrees of deflection on all surfaces with this setting. There are recommended control throws in the manual, and I used them as a starting point for all flight tests. One thing the manual doesn't mention is the use of exponential. On the low rates it is not that important, but on high rates I would recommend it. I started with 60% on high rates and 40% on low rate on all channels.

The zipped "purse" is a clever idea for accessing the radio compartment. I'll have to figure out a way to do this with balsa! There is plenty of room in the purse for the receiver, ESC, and battery pack. Depending on your servos, you may want to use 16" servo extensions for the rudder and elevator servos to give a bit more slack to work with.

With the C-25 ESC and ElectriFly 3S 1500mAhr Li-Po pack, the power system was a snap to setup. Everything just plugged together. The battery is held in place with the supplied hook and loop material. I needed to mount the pack all the way forward against the firewall to balance the model at the recommend point. My YAK-55 came out 0.2oz. over the recommended range, but this has not affected the flight characteristics.

I mounted the ESC on the inside of the purse with some double sided tape that came with it, and cut a small slit in the fuselage side to poke the arming switch through. A dab of hot melt glue secured the switch to the side of the fuselage.

With a fresh charge on the battery pack, I spun up the 370 motor and let it settle out a bit. After about one minute, the current draw had stabilized at 10.2A with the pack voltage at 10V for 102W into the motor (95W/lb.). The propeller was spinning at approximately 5300rpm. I don't have a good method for measuring the thrust, but held vertically the YAK-55 wanted to fly out of my hand and I would estimate it at well over 20oz.

I completed my YAK-55 over a few evenings while snapping photos and working on some other projects. If you had everything available, I would say that you could finish this kit in less than 3 hours.

Flying

The weather here in Michigan has not been that cooperative for flying a light weight plane. The first few times I had the YAK-55 out, the wind was in the 10mph to 15mph range and it didn't like it all that much. This is more a calm air kind of plane. Finally we got a chance to fly her in a large indoor venue.

Basics

Launching it is a non-event. Grab it by the canopy, throttle up, and give it a gentle toss and you're on your way. The stock power system has plenty of power and it climbs out with authority. On low rates, the YAK-55 handles somewhere between a trainer and mild aerobatic plane. Switch it to high rates and it has all of the control authority for all out 3D flying. On the ground I was a bit worried about the flexibility of the FlightFlex fuselage, but this is not noticed in the air. The contrasting color scheme top and bottom helps maintain orientation and it is maneuverable enough (even on low rates) for the local ball diamond or soccer field.

The YAK-55 does not glide very well, which makes landing a snap. Just fly it right in, chop the power and plop it down on it's belly. The FlightFlex fuselage has proven itself very durable, but the cowling is showing some wear and tear.

3D Flying

To wring out the YAK-55, I turned over the controls to Larry Markey in his indoor warehouse. With the recommended high rate control throws he throttled up and I gave the YAK-55 a gentle toss. He immediately put the YAK-55 into a hover and then proceeded to put it through it's paces. There is plenty of elevator and rudder authority to maintain hover and for any other 3D maneuver.

With the CG at the recommended location, the YAK-55 required a bit of down to maintain inverted flight. So, I would say that the recommended CG is a bit on the conservative side. More experienced pilots can shave another ounce or two by using a smaller battery pack and not worry about the CG being too far back.

High alpha maneuvers are very stable upright and inverted. If you slow it down too much, a wing will start to drop off but recovery just requires a bit of throttle. The flight characteristics benefit from the symmetrical airfoil, and there is no evidence of wing rock.

The overall 3D characteristics of the YAK-55 are excellent. The stock power system has more than enough power to hover and get out of trouble. The symmetrical airfoil makes high alpha flight very stable. These two characteristics form the cornerstone of a solid performing 3D model. Add to this the larger size, and you get a bit more stability than a typical foamie.

After a four or five minute flight (the pack had much more still to give), the ESC and pack come out warm but nowhere near hot. There is no cooling in the fuselage, so it is a good idea to use an over rated ESC.

The video below was shot in a fairly small indoor warehouse, and the YAK-55 is much larger than the typical light weight foamies flown here. Even so, you can see that it is maneuverable enough to negotiate the space. We did test the crash worthiness a couple of times and the FlightFlex proved itself very durable. After a fairly hard hit into the wall, the only damage sustained was the motor stick was pushed in a bit and the elevator horn snapped. The motor stick required a few drops of CA to get it back in action.

We were able to do a quick field repair on the control horn with some more CA, but I think these are the weak point of the design. The control horns are better suited for sub 10oz. foamies, and may not be fully up to the task for this 16 oz. beast. I have replaced the control horn with the same type and time will tell if it will last. Keep in mind that this was indoors into concrete, and that this plane is better suited for low wind outdoor flying.

Downloads

Another video of the YAK-55 in outdoor action is here ( Yak Video ) on the Great Planes website.

Conclusion

The YAK-55 is a very complete kit, and the available Electrifly accessories make completing it very easy. The resiliency of the FlightFlex material and the stock 3D performance make this a really nice 3D trainer. The standard stick motor mount makes it easy to upgrade the power system as you gain experience. Overall, I think Great Planes has done a good job balancing crashability and flight characteristics in one model.

Thanks to Larry Markey for his help in the flight video.

Discussion

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Old Jan 04, 2006, 03:24 PM
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Aerospacer's Avatar
United States, MN, Big Lake
Joined Sep 2003
274 Posts
I have seen this model fly and the review seems to properly describe its flight characteristics. In regards to the power system, it is the same as the one I have in the GP Yak 55 Park Flyer EP (made of "non-flightflex" foam).

I've found a couple shortcomings in the power system. A minor thing is that the molding flash on the prop will slice the o-ring binder for the prop saver. Also, the spur gear's prop shaft is very soft. Mine was bent right out of the box and has gotten bent a couple of times on rough landings. I have moved the prop saver hub back up against the spur gear to reduce the overhang leverage the prop has to bent the shaft.
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Old Jan 04, 2006, 05:35 PM
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Jim Young's Avatar
Brighton, MI USA
Joined Jun 2000
1,821 Posts
Thanks for the comments. I took a closer look at my prop, and you are right about the flash. I had broken an o-ring in one crash, but did not attribute it the the prop flash but rather the severity of the crash.

I just double checked my gearbox shaft, and it is still running true, so they may have improved it. Your suggestion about moving in the hub is a good precaution.

-Jim
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Old Jan 05, 2006, 02:17 AM
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San Diego, CA
Joined May 2004
1,328 Posts
awesome... can this plane use a 1200maH lipo battery?? i don't want to buy a new bat. for it...


also... how do i set the low rates on this plane, if i don't have a computerized radio???
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Old Jan 05, 2006, 05:23 AM
FFF
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FFF's Avatar
Brisbane
Joined Nov 2005
34 Posts
power system weight

Hi

I am interetsed in getting one of the Yak 55, just wondering what would be a good power system weight, ESC, Motor and battery?

Currently I only got 2000amh+ Li-Po, which they all weighted 145g plus.

What would be the maximum weight of battery?

Regards

FFF
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Old Jan 05, 2006, 05:53 AM
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Jim Young's Avatar
Brighton, MI USA
Joined Jun 2000
1,821 Posts
The 1500mAhr, 8C ElectriFly pack weighs in at 4.0oz (112g). I have also flown it with a 2000mAhr, 10C pack that weighs in at 4.3oz. (130g). With the 2000 pack, the CG is just ahead of (<1/4") of the recommended C.G. I didn't notice any real difference in the flight characteristics, so a 145g pack may be okay. You'll have more room to play around with the CG as well.

GP recommends a 1200 to 1500mAhr pack for this plane. From what I've experienced, it would need to be one of the heavier 1200mAhr packs. I have a 1320TP pack, and it comes in at 3oz. (80g), and I don't think it would balance out the model without adding lead to the nose. Keep in mind the current draw requirements as well.

As far as getting low rates, simply setup up the control rods in the outer most hole at the control surface, and the inner most hole at the servo. This will reduce the control throw considerably. You will not be able to switch in flight, but you can change them as you become more comfortable with the plane. For 3D flying, you really need a computer radio, since I think exponential is a must to tame the large control deflections.

-Jim
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Old Jan 05, 2006, 07:41 PM
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San Diego, CA
Joined May 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Young
The 1500mAhr, 8C ElectriFly pack weighs in at 4.0oz (112g). I have also flown it with a 2000mAhr, 10C pack that weighs in at 4.3oz. (130g). With the 2000 pack, the CG is just ahead of (<1/4") of the recommended C.G. I didn't notice any real difference in the flight characteristics, so a 145g pack may be okay. You'll have more room to play around with the CG as well.

GP recommends a 1200 to 1500mAhr pack for this plane. From what I've experienced, it would need to be one of the heavier 1200mAhr packs. I have a 1320TP pack, and it comes in at 3oz. (80g), and I don't think it would balance out the model without adding lead to the nose. Keep in mind the current draw requirements as well.

As far as getting low rates, simply setup up the control rods in the outer most hole at the control surface, and the inner most hole at the servo. This will reduce the control throw considerably. You will not be able to switch in flight, but you can change them as you become more comfortable with the plane. For 3D flying, you really need a computer radio, since I think exponential is a must to tame the large control deflections.

-Jim

awesome... thanks!!!!! So then i don't have to buy a new battery and anything else!! YAY!!!!!!!!!
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Old Jan 06, 2006, 05:27 AM
FFF
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Brisbane
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Thanks Jim,

So that I can use my existing battery!

I also have 400 szie BL motor, can I fit them in as well, I know the plane take 370 size, if this is what it will take, any advise on 370 size BL motor for the plane?

That way I only need to buy new Rx and servos.

Many thanks

FFF

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Young
The 1500mAhr, 8C ElectriFly pack weighs in at 4.0oz (112g). I have also flown it with a 2000mAhr, 10C pack that weighs in at 4.3oz. (130g). With the 2000 pack, the CG is just ahead of (<1/4") of the recommended C.G. I didn't notice any real difference in the flight characteristics, so a 145g pack may be okay. You'll have more room to play around with the CG as well.


-Jim
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Old Jan 06, 2006, 05:47 AM
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Jim Young's Avatar
Brighton, MI USA
Joined Jun 2000
1,821 Posts
FFF,

The 370 motor comes assembled to the gearbox which has a "standard" stick type mount. I would guess that your 400 motor wouldn't fit into the gearbox. So, I would think you would have to get a stick mount gearbox for your motor. If you can send some more specifics on your motor, I can measure the stock gearbox to see if it might fit.

-Jim
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Old Jan 06, 2006, 06:20 AM
FFF
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Brisbane
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Hi Jim

The outter diameter is 27.5mm Lenght is about 35.6mm. The weight is about 60g.

I really want to learn to fly 3D. Because I know Hobby Shop with in door race tracks for cars near me. But I think I could do 3D flying as well in there as well. The area is about 500 Sq meter, the celiing is about 6-7 meter from the ground I think we can do it in such area.

What sort of competition can be run for 3D flyings? I may try to ask the shop owner to let us try.

Many thanks

FFF

Many thanks





Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Young
FFF,

The 370 motor comes assembled to the gearbox which has a "standard" stick type mount. I would guess that your 400 motor wouldn't fit into the gearbox. So, I would think you would have to get a stick mount gearbox for your motor. If you can send some more specifics on your motor, I can measure the stock gearbox to see if it might fit.

-Jim
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Old Jan 12, 2006, 06:34 AM
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Jim Young's Avatar
Brighton, MI USA
Joined Jun 2000
1,821 Posts
Hi FFF,

Sorry for the long delay to respond.

The stock motor is approximately 22mm in diameter, and 35mm long. I forgot
to weigh it before assembling it. It looks like you would need a new gearbox as well.

There are all sorts of 3D events, start off in the 3D forum.

-Jim
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Old Jan 15, 2006, 07:00 PM
prop wash
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North of Toronto in Ontario
Joined Dec 2002
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Bummed out

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbourke

Great Planes ElectriFly Yak 55 EP Nearly Indestructible FlightFlex Foamie ARF Review
By Jim Young

Jim Young finds that Great Planes has sucessfully combined crash resistance, unique materials (the fuse ZIPPERS!) and classic construction techniques with strong 3D flight characteristics in the YAK-55!
Hi I got my new Yak55 two days ago and spent an entire day putting it together. I had it out today for it's first flight and had one ruff landing.
The fuse split in half just behind the wing. So much for "crash resistance", I would hardly call my landing a crash
I took a picture of the fuse were it split. The part that bothers me the most is I spent two week looking for a rugged plane and doing all kinds of reading on the net. The video shows a person bending the fuse right in half and then flying it. The plane is also cartwheeled into the ground in the video. Did I get a dud
$90.00 plus tax later and I am completly disapointed and bummed out.

Glen
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Last edited by biggy boy; Jan 15, 2006 at 07:12 PM.
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Old Jan 15, 2006, 09:39 PM
Micro Brushless crazy
Uttam1's Avatar
India, Bangalore
Joined Jul 2002
1,012 Posts
Glen,

I read in the R3D Mini thread that EPP does not hold up very well to the cold weather? I just checked, and it says -12 in Toronto, so this could explain why your fuse cracked.

-Uttam
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Old Jan 15, 2006, 10:02 PM
prop wash
biggy boy's Avatar
North of Toronto in Ontario
Joined Dec 2002
1,177 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uttam1
Glen,

I read in the R3D Mini thread that EPP does not hold up very well to the cold weather? I just checked, and it says -12 in Toronto, so this could explain why your fuse cracked.

-Uttam
HI Uttam1 do you have a link to that thread? I was wondering if that was part of the problem.

Thanks
Glen
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Old Jan 15, 2006, 10:31 PM
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Uttam1's Avatar
India, Bangalore
Joined Jul 2002
1,012 Posts
Hey Glen,

Look here, nothing conclusive, but could be a possibility:

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...&page=24&pp=15

-Uttam
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