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Old Dec 08, 2005, 11:11 AM
byrocat
Guest
n/a Posts
Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

This month's Flygin Models included a quick note in the "Letters"
section on transferring parts drawings from photocopy shhets to balsa
sheets for cutting.

I've tried it with dry irons and last night with my wife's nail polish
remover (acetone plus other stuff). Results were really iffy -- one or
two portions of lines were transferred easily, everything else was too
faint to be useful.

What was I doing wrong? Should I have put a weight on the sheet after
soaking with with acetone to ensure the transfer? Should I have used
pure acetone?

Since acetone is a flammible, I already know that the rags and such go
outside into the garbage. Any other precautions that I should be taking
beside not breathing the fumes?

Bruce
aka "Whee in Aurora....."

Old Dec 08, 2005, 01:11 PM
The Natural Philosopher
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

On 8 Dec 2005 07:43:36 -0800, byrocat wrote:

> This month's Flygin Models included a quick note in the "Letters"
> section on transferring parts drawings from photocopy shhets to balsa
> sheets for cutting.
>
> I've tried it with dry irons and last night with my wife's nail polish
> remover (acetone plus other stuff). Results were really iffy -- one or
> two portions of lines were transferred easily, everything else was too
> faint to be useful.
>
> What was I doing wrong? Should I have put a weight on the sheet after
> soaking with with acetone to ensure the transfer? Should I have used
> pure acetone?
>
> Since acetone is a flammible, I already know that the rags and such go
> outside into the garbage. Any other precautions that I should be taking
> beside not breathing the fumes?
>
> Bruce
> aka "Whee in Aurora....."


I use dope thinners and do my own laser prints.

The best method is to lay te drawing face down on the wood, and get a pad -
sponge , loo paper or cotton wool - and soak it in thinners, then squeeze
out.

Wipe that firmly over the paper till it JUST goes translucent,
Not enough and its too faint, too much and the ink runs.

Practice makes - if not perfect - good enough, to cut from.
Old Dec 09, 2005, 05:11 AM
The Raven
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

Photocopy works better when the plans are copied on a reasonably dark
setting. Puts more toner onto the paper, which can then transfer to paper.

Don't use acetone I think methanol is safer. For the environmentally
concious I'm told vinegar works as well.

Hot iron, which is unlikely to reach the flash point of methanol or
vinegar......does vinegar have a flashpoint? IIRC most photocopier fusers
run around the 90C mark.

Have to admit I've never done this but the other half has for some sewing
stuff. Vinegar is what she used, can't recall how the results were other
than she did it.


--
The Raven
http://www.80scartoons.co.uk/batfinkquote.mp3
** Now I will bring chaos to the world!


"byrocat" <bdealhoy@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:1134056616.790555.272340@g14g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
> This month's Flygin Models included a quick note in the "Letters"
> section on transferring parts drawings from photocopy shhets to balsa
> sheets for cutting.
>
> I've tried it with dry irons and last night with my wife's nail polish
> remover (acetone plus other stuff). Results were really iffy -- one or
> two portions of lines were transferred easily, everything else was too
> faint to be useful.
>
> What was I doing wrong? Should I have put a weight on the sheet after
> soaking with with acetone to ensure the transfer? Should I have used
> pure acetone?
>
> Since acetone is a flammible, I already know that the rags and such go
> outside into the garbage. Any other precautions that I should be taking
> beside not breathing the fumes?
>
> Bruce
> aka "Whee in Aurora....."
>



Old Dec 09, 2005, 09:11 AM
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

On Fri, 9 Dec 2005 20:17:01 +1100, "The Raven" <swilson150@yahoo.com.au> wrote
in <43994b8f$0$21121$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au> :

>Photocopy works better when the plans are copied on a reasonably dark
>setting. Puts more toner onto the paper, which can then transfer to paper.


Photocopiers can introduce small distortions in the copy.

Some copiers used to routinely shrink the copy 1% or 2%
in one direction.

If you're doing small parts, it probably won't matter.
The bigger the part, the bigger the problem.

If you want to do big parts, you should test the copier
by copying a ruler and seeing how well the copy
compares to the original in both the X- and Y-axis.
Then try to orient all the parts the same way on
the copy so that the distortion is at least consistent.

Marty
Old Dec 10, 2005, 01:11 AM
The Raven
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

"Martin X. Moleski, SJ" <moleski@canisius.edu> wrote in message
news:61vip19m89eprrcnkti87uh6ln2mgtkvlo@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 9 Dec 2005 20:17:01 +1100, "The Raven" <swilson150@yahoo.com.au>
> wrote
> in <43994b8f$0$21121$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au> :
>
>>Photocopy works better when the plans are copied on a reasonably dark
>>setting. Puts more toner onto the paper, which can then transfer to paper.

>
> Photocopiers can introduce small distortions in the copy.
>
> Some copiers used to routinely shrink the copy 1% or 2%
> in one direction.
>
> If you're doing small parts, it probably won't matter.
> The bigger the part, the bigger the problem.


A valid point but given you're rarely dealing with A3 sizes or larger
(metric paper here folks, not that US weird stuff) you won't get much
inaccuracy. Another point to consider is how accurate such a transfer
process will be on the balsa, will the transfer be 100% and how accurate are
our cutting skills.
>
> If you want to do big parts, you should test the copier
> by copying a ruler and seeing how well the copy
> compares to the original in both the X- and Y-axis.
> Then try to orient all the parts the same way on
> the copy so that the distortion is at least consistent.


I used to work in the printing industry so I could also suggest to measure
the paper before and after copying. While this is unlikely to yield any
measurable difference large printed sheets can stretch by up to 5mm. So, for
the big plan boys consider how accurate your plan really is.........


--
The Raven
http://www.80scartoons.co.uk/batfinkquote.mp3
** Now I will bring chaos to the world!


Old Dec 10, 2005, 01:11 PM
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

On Sat, 10 Dec 2005 16:02:05 +1100, "The Raven" <swilson150@yahoo.com.au> wrote
in <439a614f$0$20235$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au> :

>> Some copiers used to routinely shrink the copy 1% or 2%
>> in one direction.


>A valid point but given you're rarely dealing with A3 sizes or larger
>(metric paper here folks, not that US weird stuff) you won't get much
>inaccuracy.


I became aware of the problem when I was trying to tape
four or five pages together to make a pattern for an
Ultra Sport 40 fuselage (if I remember correctly).

The deviation was enough to be visible to my eye and
led me to find out about the auto-reduction on our
copier. It didn't make any difference to the construction
of the fuselage. I think I used a yardstick to
straighten out the lines and--of course!--sanded and
sanded and sanded until the fuselage looked OK.
It's still flying--after I broke the wing that went with
it, I sold it and a TT .46 to a friend who had a good
wing and no fuse.

>Another point to consider is how accurate such a transfer
>process will be on the balsa, will the transfer be 100% and how accurate are
>our cutting skills.


Yes. I'm sure I can't cut and sand to 99% accuracy. )

>I used to work in the printing industry so I could also suggest to measure
>the paper before and after copying. While this is unlikely to yield any
>measurable difference large printed sheets can stretch by up to 5mm. So, for
>the big plan boys consider how accurate your plan really is.........


If I've got the terms in the right order, what we need is a certain
amount of precision so that parts that are supposed to fit
together do fit together, while accuracy doesn't matter so
much (except in scale judging).

Marty
Old Dec 12, 2005, 11:11 PM
Ted Campanelli
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
so great) words of knowledge:

If you want ACCURATE parts, have a copy of the plans made at a reputable
place (Kinkos or a blueprint shop ) and cut the parts from the plan and
use either a glue stick or rubber cement or 3M #77 (spray a LIGHT coat )
to adhere the cut out parts to the wood. It takes alittle longer, but
the parts are not distorted.

> This month's Flygin Models included a quick note in the "Letters"
> section on transferring parts drawings from photocopy shhets to balsa
> sheets for cutting.
>
> I've tried it with dry irons and last night with my wife's nail polish
> remover (acetone plus other stuff). Results were really iffy -- one or
> two portions of lines were transferred easily, everything else was too
> faint to be useful.
>
> What was I doing wrong? Should I have put a weight on the sheet after
> soaking with with acetone to ensure the transfer? Should I have used
> pure acetone?
>
> Since acetone is a flammible, I already know that the rags and such go
> outside into the garbage. Any other precautions that I should be taking
> beside not breathing the fumes?
>
> Bruce
> aka "Whee in Aurora....."
>

Old Dec 26, 2005, 11:11 AM
Algy
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Acetone used to transfer photocopy parts to balsa

The method I usually employ for small items is to scan in the relevant
part from the original plan.

Load the scanned image into my usual photo manipulation software and
crop as necessary.

Finally print this image using printer on to thin card.

Cut round printed image to make template.

Generally speaking I have found this method to be pretty accurate.

Granted, this method takes longer but the main benefit is that the plan
remains intact.

The templates can be retained for future use (repairs etc.)

Al

byrocat wrote:
> This month's Flygin Models included a quick note in the "Letters"
> section on transferring parts drawings from photocopy shhets to balsa
> sheets for cutting.
>
> I've tried it with dry irons and last night with my wife's nail polish
> remover (acetone plus other stuff). Results were really iffy -- one or
> two portions of lines were transferred easily, everything else was too
> faint to be useful.
>
> What was I doing wrong? Should I have put a weight on the sheet after
> soaking with with acetone to ensure the transfer? Should I have used
> pure acetone?
>
> Since acetone is a flammible, I already know that the rags and such go
> outside into the garbage. Any other precautions that I should be taking
> beside not breathing the fumes?
>
> Bruce
> aka "Whee in Aurora....."
>

 


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