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Old Nov 16, 2005, 03:28 PM
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Joined Mar 2005
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Guillow's build...

I'm getting geared up to build an e-convertion for a Guillow's FW-190. 400 series with 25 3/4" wing span. My question could apply probably to most Guillows builds... How do you guys strengthen the plane but keep it light. My fear is that with one bad launch(maybe the first) the plane will not survive meeting the ground. I plan on using a home made brushless outrunner.. has anyone had luck with this airplane motor combo. Thanks.
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Old Nov 16, 2005, 09:26 PM
Team 30 Micro EDF
Mike Taylor's Avatar
Camarillo, California
Joined Apr 2002
4,516 Posts
Do a search for 'Guillows Conversion' - use the advanced search, and search just the 'Airplanes - Electric' forum. You'll find lots of threads including 24" conversions...
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 09:46 AM
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someone did a fw-190 i believe. cant remember what size. it was built stock and flew good if i remember correctly
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 12:41 PM
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glewis's Avatar
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Here is my 109 from the Guillows 400 series kit. It is fully sheeted with 1/32 and painted with Model Master acrylics. I replaced all the formers aft of the wing TE with new ones cut from 1/32 sheet. The tail surfaces are 3/32 sheet. Power is a homemade outrunner. With a 2 cell 830 lipo it will almost fly out of my hand, just a gentle toss and off she goes. This one was such a sucess I'll be converting more of the 400 kits. I want to do a P 40 or a FW 190 next.
Glenn
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 02:21 PM
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Aiken, South Carolina, United States
Joined Apr 2004
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thats a good looking 109. I thought converting mine but decided not to because of the size of the fuse. Right now I am converting a flying styro rubber power 109
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 02:55 PM
Gravity is a harsh mistress.
Tim Wolff's Avatar
United States, MI, Temperance
Joined Sep 2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TooSlow
thats a good looking 109. I thought converting mine but decided not to because of the size of the fuse. Right now I am converting a flying styro rubber power 109
I've go one of those too. Let us know how it goes.
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 03:03 PM
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Glenn, How did you get the 1/32 balsa onto the fuselage frame? how much weight did it add compared to a solite/monokote type of plastic covering? i am currently building a guillows p47 and have been tinkering with balsa covering to keep the nose better protected from minor crashes and hard landings. Does the balsa covering add a lot of strength to the nose?

Looks absolutely fanstastic !!!!!!!

thanks,
jeff
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 04:15 PM
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USA, FL, Tampa
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Jeff
Yes the sheet does add a lot of strength to the airframe. The completed model weighs 5.5 oz without battery. The sheet does add weight compared to a solite covered frame but I like the look a lot better. The 109 fuse cross section has flatish sides and bottom and a rounded top. I was able to sheet it with four pieces. The P-47 would be a bit harder to do. I think it could be done in six strips if you wet the wood to make the coumpond curves. I would use stringers only where the sheet butt joints are. I built the 109 fuse on a crutch like a Ryan warbird to keep everything straight while the sheet was applied. I wrapped a piece of elastic I snagged from my wifes sewing box around the fuse to hold the sheet on while the glue dried. The wing is also sheeted. I reduced the rib count to four and used a 1/16" sheet spar. The wing is held on with a couple of magnets. The model was brushed with 2 coats of thinned Deft lacquer then sprayed with the camo pattern. I built this reduced Ryan Bearcat and the 109 followed using a similar construction method. They are both sweet flying birds.
Glenn
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Old Nov 17, 2005, 11:21 PM
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Thanks glewis! That's the info I was looking for. Your planes look perfect...too nice to fly Did you have a build thread?

I'm sure with the sheeting it can handle a mishap much better then the stock build would. How well do thoes ailerons work outer there on the outer half of the wing.. How did you rig them up??

Thanks
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Old Nov 18, 2005, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scudrunner77
Thanks glewis! That's the info I was looking for. Your planes look perfect...too nice to fly Did you have a build thread?

I'm sure with the sheeting it can handle a mishap much better then the stock build would. How well do thoes ailerons work outer there on the outer half of the wing.. How did you rig them up??

Thanks
Sorry no build thread. The Bearcat was the first model I have built using this method. The maiden flight went well until the landing. I was afraid a belly landing would damage the airframe and slowed her down too much on final. I spiraled her in from about 5" high. The wing deteched as the whole mess cartwheeled in the grass!. OOPS. The end of the walk-o-shame revealed no damage at all. I plugged the wing back on and tossed her back in the air. This process was repeated a few times until I quit trying to land at my feet ( our field has a lot of standing water) and got the hang of how much speed is needed on landing. I even overshot the landing zone and smacked her down on a sidewalk with the only damage being scuffed paint on the belly. This is one strong bird. The ailerons on the bearcat are very effective and rolling vertical climbs are my favorite. The 109's roll rate is not as good but it is not as twitchy as the F8. It also flys a bit slower and is easier to keep up with. It's a bit sluggish in the roll but looks scale to me. The F8 gets real small really fast at the speed she flys and needs about as mush space as a GWS warbird to fly in. Both models use torque rods to the ailerons with a single servo.

Glenn
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Old Nov 18, 2005, 10:21 AM
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Hamburg, Germany
Joined Dec 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burgan
Looks absolutely fantastic !!!!!!!
Very cool, indeed!

Thanks for sharing,

Tobi
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Old Nov 18, 2005, 12:28 PM
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Dave K's Avatar
Sebastopol, Ca
Joined Jun 2004
699 Posts
To keep the Guillows planes light you need to scratch build it with nice light wood. I find I can scratch build very fast I do not think it take much longer than cutting the Guillows oak for strigers.

Dave
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