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Old Nov 26, 2009, 07:35 AM
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Brunswick, OH
Joined Nov 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jejton View Post
Whats 3D flying?
Getting your plane to "hover." It means you're able to hang the plane on the prop. You're not really moveing forward through the air, you have enough thrust to make the plane just hover.

Example of 3D (go to 3:30):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBm3Q4obAQg

If you can make the plane stop in mid air and go backwards that's called 4D (and requires a variable pitch prop).

Example of 4D:
RC 4D Amazing Flying (2 min 10 sec)
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Old Nov 26, 2009, 11:32 AM
Fly it like U stole it
Pickle72's Avatar
Champaign, Il
Joined Mar 2008
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Quote:
Whats 3D flying?
What Happy said. Plus any time you are flying (in control of the aircraft) when the wings are stalled is 3D flying.

You need greater than 1:1 thrust to weight ratio and lots of control throw and large control surfaces.

Matt
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Old Nov 26, 2009, 05:46 PM
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United States, SC, West Columbia
Joined Oct 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyKillmore View Post
Getting your plane to "hover." It means you're able to hang the plane on the prop. You're not really moveing forward through the air, you have enough thrust to make the plane just hover.

Example of 3D (go to 3:30):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBm3Q4obAQg

If you can make the plane stop in mid air and go backwards that's called 4D (and requires a variable pitch prop).

Example of 4D:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQfz5LttoQQ
wow! that 4d pilot is amazing!
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Old Nov 27, 2009, 02:32 AM
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so great!
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Old Jan 14, 2010, 12:27 PM
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Colorado Springs, CO.
Joined Mar 2009
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Where can I find a good definition of "Park Flyer"?
What does "Sloper" mean?
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Old Jan 14, 2010, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface26 View Post
Where can I find a good definition of "Park Flyer"?
What does "Sloper" mean?
A park flyer is a smaller plane usually under 2 pounds, and can be flown in a relatively small park. A sloper is a big glider usually thrown off a big slope, and motorless.
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Old Jan 14, 2010, 02:01 PM
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Thanx for your help!
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Old Jan 14, 2010, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface26 View Post
Thanx for your help!
No problem!
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 07:30 PM
Woodsy
Drouin, Australia
Joined Sep 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by microflitedude View Post
Snip> A sloper is a big glider usually thrown off a big slope, and motorless.
It's a bit broarder than that,
a slope plane is a NON powered plane (glider) that uses wind updraft from a land formation (cliff, buildings, hills) to gain lift, as oposed to a "thermal" plane which is a glider that uses updrafts from metralogical conditions to gain lift.

'generaly' a slope plane will have a geater wing loading than a thermal plane.

then within slope planes there are MANY diferent sorts, you can use a thermal plane, PSS, DS, etc, etc

http://www.shallowsky.com/planes/weasel/slopetips.html
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodsy View Post
It's a bit broarder than that,
a slope plane is a NON powered plane (glider) that uses wind updraft from a land formation (cliff, buildings, hills) to gain lift, as oposed to a "thermal" plane which is a glider that uses updrafts from metralogical conditions to gain lift.

'generaly' a slope plane will have a geater wing loading than a thermal plane.

then within slope planes there are MANY diferent sorts, you can use a thermal plane, PSS, DS, etc, etc

http://www.shallowsky.com/planes/weasel/slopetips.html
ok smarty pants. who cares about pss ds thermal metralogical bla bla. let's keep it simple.
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Old Jan 26, 2010, 05:33 PM
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Seattle
Joined Aug 2009
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I think slope and sloper are also applied to variants of ARFs that don't have power or landing gear. At least, that's how GWS does it. They have several different SKUs (er, variations) of a given plane: RTF, NPS (no power but LG), Slope (NPS minus LG). They might be getting away from the slope variant.
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Old Jan 29, 2010, 03:13 PM
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Houston, TX
Joined Sep 2007
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BEC vs UBEC

http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=69720977400
Quote:
7. What is a BEC?

BEC stands for Battery Elimination Circuit. This is often a built in feature of the ESC which eliminates the need for a separate battery to power the receiver and servos. The BEC takes power from the main battery pack and reduces it to about 5 volts, and then sends it on to the receiver via the red wire of the ESC receiver plug. A BEC will commonly have a maximum amp rating of 1 to 3 amps, and this is usually stated somewhere on the ESC, or on the ESC instruction sheet.

8. What is a UBEC?

UBEC stands for Universal Battery Elimination Circuit. The UBEC is a small electronic device that is used to power the receivers/servos of a model if the ESC being used does not have a built in BEC, or if the BEC of the ESC is inadequate to power the number of servos being used. The UBEC is connected directly to the main battery pack of an electric model, the same as the ESC. In fact, the power input wires of the UBEC are often spliced into the power input wires of the ESC. The power output wires of the UBEC have a receiver connector on them, and this is usually plugged into any open channel of the receiver. If the ESC being used has a built in BEC, that BEC must be disabled when using a UBEC. To disable the BEC of an ESC, simply disconnect the red wire on the receiver plug of the ESC.
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Old Feb 03, 2010, 07:37 AM
Old Toolmaker
Angola,Indiana
Joined Jan 2010
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how about a page on glues. GG,PU,foam safe ?
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Old Feb 03, 2010, 03:31 PM
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United States, CT, Brooklyn
Joined Oct 2009
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Need info on foam safe adhesives.. asap>>???
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Old Feb 03, 2010, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeroplanecolt View Post
Need info on foam safe adhesives.. asap>>???
what do you mean?
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