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Old Nov 05, 2005, 02:11 AM
H Davis
Guest
n/a Posts
Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

I bought a very nice used iron, but it didn't come with the basic directions
or information sheet. Its the one above and its dial has three heat
settings: 1 | | | 2 | | | 3

Can anyone tell me what the corresponding heats are on this iron and give me
a basic idea of which setting are used for various jobs. My immediate
objective is to tighten up some lose Monokote on a wing panel of a Tower
Trainer 60. I've also e-mailed TopFlite to see if they can furnish me with
new instructions/information.

If anyone can point me to a site where I can read a bit more on the subject
of covering I would appreciate it. I would also value opinions on
alternatives to Monokote. In reading all of the old posts on this news
group, I believe I saw some comments indicating that some of you preferred
another product over Monokote.

Thanks for any information you loan me. I'll pass it on someday.

Harlan


Old Nov 05, 2005, 02:11 AM
H Davis
Guest
n/a Posts
Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

I bought a very nice used iron, but it didn't come with the basic directions
or information sheet. Its the one above and its dial has three heat
settings: 1 | | | 2 | | | 3

Can anyone tell me what the corresponding heats are on this iron and give me
a basic idea of which setting are used for various jobs. My immediate
objective is to tighten up some lose Monokote on a wing panel of a Tower
Trainer 60. I've also e-mailed TopFlite to see if they can furnish me with
new instructions/information.

If anyone can point me to a site where I can read a bit more on the subject
of covering I would appreciate it. I would also value opinions on
alternatives to Monokote. In reading all of the old posts on this news
group, I believe I saw some comments indicating that some of you preferred
another product over Monokote.

Thanks for any information you loan me. I'll pass it on someday.

Harlan



Old Nov 05, 2005, 02:11 AM
Doug McLaren
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

In article <XIWdnZFyPopT0fHeRVn-pQ@wideopenwest.com>,
H Davis <hdavisREMOVE@wowway.com> wrote:

| I bought a very nice used iron, but it didn't come with the basic directions
| or information sheet. Its the one above and its dial has three heat
| settings: 1 | | | 2 | | | 3
|
| Can anyone tell me what the corresponding heats are on this iron and give me
| a basic idea of which setting are used for various jobs.

The heats tend to vary from iron to iron. Your best bet is to buy a
thermometer and measure it yourself.

Good choices would be the `DuraTrax FlashPoint Infrared Temperature
Gauge' which is here --

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXEMG5&P=ML

or the `Coverite Pocket Thermometer' here

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXB352&P=7

for a lot less.

You should also get a sock like this one --

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXB363&P=ML

to keep from scratching up your covering.

As for the exact temperatures, it doesn't matter that much. Keep
moving around until it's shrunk up as much as you need. Don't stay in
one place or you'll ruin it.

If you've got a monokote package lying around, it'll give general
instructions on how to apply it, including temperatures.

| In reading all of the old posts on this news group, I believe I saw
| some comments indicating that some of you preferred another product
| over Monokote.

I'm very fond of Ultracote.

--
Doug McLaren, dougmc@frenzy.com Anything worth doing is worth overdoing.
Old Nov 05, 2005, 04:11 PM
Mr Akimoto
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

Just try various temperature settings with some scrap Monocote. You
don't really need any instructions beyond what come with your Monocote.


You must be careful of the heat with stuff other than Monocote like
Econocote and Towercote that require much lower settings. Again
experiment with scraps.

Ciao,

Mr Akimoto

Old Nov 05, 2005, 08:11 PM
rich
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

The quick and dirty is to start with a low temp, and see if the coating
sticks to a scrap of balsa - does it melt the glue? If not, turn it up
a tad and retry it. This will allow you to find the setting that works
for your iron, and the covering you are using. It should melt the
glue, but not shrink the covering. Mark your iron with a mark so you
can return to this setting.

Then, on your scrap piece, use a higher setting to shrink the
covering. Turn it up a little bit at a time, until it starts to shrink
the covering. A lower setting will be slower shrinking, and less
shrinkage. You want to stay a tad on the low side. Mark your iron at
this higher setting. Then you can switch between the two settings.

I thought Monocoat sucked. I found it very hard to work with, even
under test conditions. So I went to Ultracoat, and it worked very well
for me. Before you buy 10 rolls, maybe you could ask club members or
friends for a sample to try out. Then go with what you like. Hope
this helps.

Regards,

Rich.....

Old Nov 06, 2005, 02:11 PM
H Davis
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

Ok, Doug I followed the advise given here and bought the pocket temperature
gauge and the sock. Don't know about the sock, yet, but the gauge worked
like a charm. It appears that there are 20-25 degrees between marks on the
iron.

I read an article by someone from downunder and he claimed that Monokote
temperatures for adhesion and shrinking were in the 350 - 380 F range. I
find that difficult to believe. From what I'm reading on the web, it seems
that 275 may be more within the working range. But, of course, I have yet to
test it out.

Thanks for the help, all.

Harlan

"Doug McLaren" <dougmc@frenzy.com> wrote in message
news:J1Zaf.72039$GQ.55294@tornado.texas.rr.com...
>
> The heats tend to vary from iron to iron. Your best bet is to buy a
> thermometer and measure it yourself.
>
> Good choices would be the `DuraTrax FlashPoint Infrared Temperature
> Gauge' which is here --
>
> http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXEMG5&P=ML
>
> or the `Coverite Pocket Thermometer' here
>
> http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXB352&P=7
>
> for a lot less.
>
> You should also get a sock like this one --
>
> http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXB363&P=ML
>
> to keep from scratching up your covering.
>
> As for the exact temperatures, it doesn't matter that much. Keep
> moving around until it's shrunk up as much as you need. Don't stay in
> one place or you'll ruin it.
>
> If you've got a monokote package lying around, it'll give general
> instructions on how to apply it, including temperatures.
>
> | In reading all of the old posts on this news group, I believe I saw
> | some comments indicating that some of you preferred another product
> | over Monokote.
>
> I'm very fond of Ultracote.
>
> --
> Doug McLaren, dougmc@frenzy.com Anything worth doing is worth
> overdoing.



Old Nov 06, 2005, 04:11 PM
Doug McLaren
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

In article <84ydnUOO3_LJ0PPenZ2dnUVZ_sadnZ2d@wideopenwest.com >,
H Davis <hdavisREMOVE@wowway.com> wrote:

| I read an article by someone from downunder and he claimed that
| Monokote temperatures for adhesion and shrinking were in the 350 -
| 380 F range. I find that difficult to believe. From what I'm reading
| on the web, it seems that 275 may be more within the working
| range. But, of course, I have yet to test it out.

Well, the instructions on the monokote would be the final word on
that. But 350-380 F does seem to be a lot hotter than you should need
to just activate the adhesive.

In any event, the usual procedure of events is that at some low
temperature, the adhesive is activated, but there is no shrinkage. As
the temperature increases, the covering starts to shrink, with the
total shrinkage increasing with temperature up to a certain limit. If
you go much hotter than that, then the covering melts and is ruined.
It's a good idea to shrink only as little as is required, as once
you've `used up' all the shrink, there's no more, and you can't shrink
it any more, no matter how hot you get it.

--
Doug McLaren, dougmc@frenzy.com
"Don't tell me I'm burning the candle at both ends -- tell me where to
get more wax!!"
Old Nov 11, 2005, 02:11 PM
stearman
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information


"rich" <cwo4cno7325@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1131238533.013515.92810@g44g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> The quick and dirty is to start with a low temp, and see if the coating
> sticks to a scrap of balsa - does it melt the glue? If not, turn it up
> a tad and retry it. This will allow you to find the setting that works
> for your iron, and the covering you are using. It should melt the
> glue, but not shrink the covering. Mark your iron with a mark so you
> can return to this setting.
>
> Then, on your scrap piece, use a higher setting to shrink the
> covering. Turn it up a little bit at a time, until it starts to shrink
> the covering. A lower setting will be slower shrinking, and less
> shrinkage. You want to stay a tad on the low side. Mark your iron at
> this higher setting. Then you can switch between the two settings.
>
> I thought Monocoat sucked. I found it very hard to work with, even
> under test conditions. So I went to Ultracoat, and it worked very well
> for me. Before you buy 10 rolls, maybe you could ask club members or
> friends for a sample to try out. Then go with what you like. Hope
> this helps.
>
> Regards,
>
> Rich.....
>


Agree with Rich. I have used both Monokote and Ultracoat (white) on a
Midwest Stearman. Found that the Ultracoat is MUCH better on compound curves
(wingtips) that the Mono. Also found that the Mono "sags" with time a lot
more than the Ultracoat. That said, when I used the dark red Mono on the
same airplane before, it worked OK. It seems that Monokote is color
dependant, i.e. some colors are better than others. What I do now is use the
Ultracoat for the large areas such as wings and fuse, and then use Mono for
trim as it does not shrink with the same heat. I used this approach on a
Goldberg Chipmunk red-white-blue color scheme (as shown on the box) and it
turned out beautiful.




Old Nov 11, 2005, 08:11 PM
Red Scholefield
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

My vote after using both extensively is for Ultracote also. I don't know if
Monokote is color dependent or batch dependent. I used some flat dove gray
and it was a real PITA to work with.

Red S.

"stearman" <stearman@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:sJ6df.485680$1i.42973@pd7tw2no...
> Agree with Rich. I have used both Monokote and Ultracoat (white) on a
> Midwest Stearman. Found that the Ultracoat is MUCH better on compound

curves
> (wingtips) that the Mono. Also found that the Mono "sags" with time a lot
> more than the Ultracoat. That said, when I used the dark red Mono on the
> same airplane before, it worked OK. It seems that Monokote is color
> dependant, i.e. some colors are better than others. What I do now is use

the
> Ultracoat for the large areas such as wings and fuse, and then use Mono

for
> trim as it does not shrink with the same heat. I used this approach on a
> Goldberg Chipmunk red-white-blue color scheme (as shown on the box) and it
> turned out beautiful.
>
>
>
>



Old Nov 11, 2005, 08:11 PM
Robert Scott
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information


"Red Scholefield" <redscho@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:Vdbdf.11997$kd.6071@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
> My vote after using both extensively is for Ultracote also. I don't know
> if
> Monokote is color dependent or batch dependent. I used some flat dove gray
> and it was a real PITA to work with.



The flat Monocote is indeed a royal PITA to use. I bought three rolls of
flat olive drab for a Wing A-26 I haven't started on yet. I borrowed a
small piece of the flat OD to use as the anti-reflective cover on the top of
the cowl and forward fuse of a GP P-51D kit. That flat Monocote would
hardly stretch or conform to curves worth a darn. I had just been using
Aluminum colored Monocote all evening and there was a very noticeable
difference in the way the flat OD Monocote went on. I didn't like it.

I decided right then the A-26 will not be covered in flat olive drab. :-)
I'll save that stuff for a couple of Fun 51s and Something Extra profile
kits I have in the shop. They have straight wings with flat wingtips and
flat fuses... a good place to use the flat Monocote!

I wish Tower sold Ultracote. I still haven't tried it yet.

Good flying,
desmobob


Old Nov 12, 2005, 12:11 AM
rich
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

Robert,

Interesting! It was the flat OD Monocoat that I bought to cover an
L4 (CUB), and I finally went to a gloss OD Ultracoat for the same
reason. On a test piece of wingtip, it was impossible to work with,
shrink, anything. Never even considered Monocoat after that experience.
I did use a few small pieces on some flat areas as "patches" that
looked ok.

Regards.....

Old Nov 12, 2005, 04:11 AM
Ed Cregger
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information


"Red Scholefield" <redscho@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:Vdbdf.11997$kd.6071@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
> My vote after using both extensively is for Ultracote also. I don't know
> if
> Monokote is color dependent or batch dependent. I used some flat dove gray
> and it was a real PITA to work with.
>
> Red S.
>
> "stearman" <stearman@shaw.ca> wrote in message
> news:sJ6df.485680$1i.42973@pd7tw2no...
>> Agree with Rich. I have used both Monokote and Ultracoat (white) on a
>> Midwest Stearman. Found that the Ultracoat is MUCH better on compound

> curves
>> (wingtips) that the Mono. Also found that the Mono "sags" with time a lot
>> more than the Ultracoat. That said, when I used the dark red Mono on the
>> same airplane before, it worked OK. It seems that Monokote is color
>> dependant, i.e. some colors are better than others. What I do now is use

> the
>> Ultracoat for the large areas such as wings and fuse, and then use Mono

> for
>> trim as it does not shrink with the same heat. I used this approach on a
>> Goldberg Chipmunk red-white-blue color scheme (as shown on the box) and
>> it
>> turned out beautiful.



Monokote has changed considerably over the decades. Today's version seems
much drier, stiffer and less flexible than I remember it when I first used
it in 1970.

Ed Cregger


Old Nov 12, 2005, 08:11 AM
Red Scholefield
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information

Glad in a way to hear others had the same problem with the flat Monokote. I
thought it was my problem. When I questioned Tower about it they said to
read and follow the directions - identical to those with regular monokote.
Ultracote is my covering of choice now.

Red S.

"Robert Scott" <desmobob@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:IFbdf.7932$m81.6870@newsread1.news.atl.earthl ink.net...
>
> "Red Scholefield" <redscho@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:Vdbdf.11997$kd.6071@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
> > My vote after using both extensively is for Ultracote also. I don't know
> > if
> > Monokote is color dependent or batch dependent. I used some flat dove

gray
> > and it was a real PITA to work with.

>
>
> The flat Monocote is indeed a royal PITA to use. I bought three rolls of
> flat olive drab for a Wing A-26 I haven't started on yet. I borrowed a
> small piece of the flat OD to use as the anti-reflective cover on the top

of
> the cowl and forward fuse of a GP P-51D kit. That flat Monocote would
> hardly stretch or conform to curves worth a darn. I had just been using
> Aluminum colored Monocote all evening and there was a very noticeable
> difference in the way the flat OD Monocote went on. I didn't like it.
>
> I decided right then the A-26 will not be covered in flat olive drab. :-)
> I'll save that stuff for a couple of Fun 51s and Something Extra profile
> kits I have in the shop. They have straight wings with flat wingtips and
> flat fuses... a good place to use the flat Monocote!
>
> I wish Tower sold Ultracote. I still haven't tried it yet.
>
> Good flying,
> desmobob
>
>



Old Nov 12, 2005, 08:11 AM
Red Scholefield
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Top Flite Monokote heat Sealing Iron Information


"Ed Cregger" <ecregger@homtail.com> wrote in message
news:76jdf.7008$Cw4.5292@fe03.lga...
> Monokote has changed considerably over the decades. Today's version seems
> much drier, stiffer and less flexible than I remember it when I first used
> it in 1970.
>
> Ed Cregger


I think the same goes for a lot of us users. :-) Nearly a half century makes
a BIG difference!

Red


 


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