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Old May 08, 2002, 12:12 AM
Registered User
central AZ
Joined May 2002
1,195 Posts
First plane: Conversion or not?

I am somewhat new to this whole thing (R/C aviation as a whole. I've been flying our Dave Brown sim for about 4 years or so, but I realize that it's nothing like the real thing). I live in the middle of the city, and the closest I have to a flying field is my neighborhood park (quite fit for the job, I would have to say).

My father has flown a few times (some ARF foamies a while (18 or more years ago), so he has started to get back into it a bit. I have also caught the bug, so I went with him to an R/C auction a while back, and picked up a Guillows Cessna 172 (36" span). I have built a smaller 24" span Cessna 150, and have purchased a Cub of the same size, as well as an 18" Mustang, all Free-Flight. I thought I'd go for something bigger and run it control line, so I got the 172.

Recently, I saw a Hornet micro heli, and was hooked. However, I don't think I am anywhere near ready for a helicopter, but I am still hooked on these smaller aircraft for their ability to fly in confined spaces and to do so quietly. And, since I couldn't have a Heli (the cost was also limiting), I looked into park/micro flyers, which is where my questions come in (forgive me for taking so long to get to them ).

Would it be suggested that I get something that would be easier for me to build and fly (I am looking at a GWS Pico Cub-FD), or would it be safe for someone like unto myself to build a larger kit, and then rig it for 4 channel control? Any relative answers I can get would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!

Nick
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Old May 08, 2002, 12:16 AM
Been There! Done That!
boomerace's Avatar
Eugene, Oregon, United States
Joined Sep 2001
19,187 Posts
It's tough to learn to fly 4 channel for your first plane... go for the cub!
boomer
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Old May 08, 2002, 11:41 AM
FLYER spelled I-squared-R
fliir's Avatar
Grand Rapids, Michigan
Joined Sep 2001
1,622 Posts
Nick:

Get the cub and go flying.

When you are ready to upgrade, most of the components (receiver, servos, etc) will transfer to the new bird.

My biggest challenge (I have a commercial pilots license) was the loss of perspective as the plane turns in the distance. This is solved by lots of time flying!

David
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Old May 08, 2002, 12:48 PM
an earth bound misfit, I
Basketcase's Avatar
St. Pete, Florida
Joined Sep 2001
9,429 Posts
I third that! Welcome to E Zone Nick.

Get the Pico Cub now, learn to fly with it and save the nice planes for after you learn.

Your flight sim experience will be a great help. I learned to fly by myself without a whole lot of carnage and attribute most of my luck to the sim practice. And some to R/C car and boat experience.

BC
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Old May 08, 2002, 08:06 PM
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central AZ
Joined May 2002
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Thanks for your responses, guys. I appreciate the warm welcome. Great to know everyone welcomes the newcomers willingly, despite all the stereotypes about kids my age! LOL.

I do agree that a 3 channel plane will be easier to learn on, and that transfering the radio, etc., will also be a good idea. However, might there be a slightly heavier Cub out there than the one GWS makes? Being as I live in Arizona, it does sometime get a bit gusty. I really like the looks for the Pico Cub, but I was thinking that something roughly equal in size, but a bit heavier (ie. Wattage's Cub 400) would handle the gusts a tad bit better. Any comments? Thanks again, guys!

Nick
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Old May 08, 2002, 08:29 PM
Been There! Done That!
boomerace's Avatar
Eugene, Oregon, United States
Joined Sep 2001
19,187 Posts
Nick,
I flew my cub quite a while and found wind did affect it more than the Tiger Moth. So.... I cut off the wing tips then cut 3 inches out of the end of the wing on each side and epoxied back on the tips then epoxied a 1/8" dowel to the leading edge of the wing full length and wraped with clear packing tape. I also got rid of the wing braces. Result handles much more wind, flys and turns much better and with power off just floats in for landings. ROG's are great with short take offs, I can fly it on my lithiums for about 40 minutes. Loops great with no wing flex and is one of my favorite planes now!
boomer
PS: I also shimmed up the back of the wing so that the trailing edge is level with the top of the fuse at that point (too much wing incidence) this stopped the tendency to climb under power!
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Old May 08, 2002, 08:45 PM
Registered User
Canada, BC, Williams Lake
Joined Dec 2001
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Boomrace;

nice job great pic....mine used to be that clean

I like the shim idea... gonna try that tomorrow thnx.

dan...
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Old May 08, 2002, 09:02 PM
Been There! Done That!
boomerace's Avatar
Eugene, Oregon, United States
Joined Sep 2001
19,187 Posts
Dan,
Shim should do the same with the standard wing... I got sick of holding dowm elevator on full power
boomer
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Old May 08, 2002, 10:05 PM
an earth bound misfit, I
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St. Pete, Florida
Joined Sep 2001
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Nick, It all depends on how much room you have. If you have a small area the Pico Cub would be great. If you have a large enough area for it, I'd say a soccer or football field minimum, the Wattage Cub might work. Check out the posts by Genovia and Piper about the Wattage 400 Cub. They are both doing a great job with it. A 400 is near the upper range for parkflyers.

Those guys can probably also confirm that a foam plane makes learning less painful. I'd recommend starting with a Pico Cub and save the Wattage for your second plane. You'll be surprised, the little slowflyers are nice flying planes. If you plan ahead you can get the right esc and batteries to make moving up to a 400 plane easier.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...ht=wattage+cub

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...ht=wattage+cub

BC
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Old May 11, 2002, 01:39 PM
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central AZ
Joined May 2002
1,195 Posts
Man, these forums are pretty active! Took me a while to find my post. Anyway, thanks for the tips, guys. Boomerace, I'm note sure if I'll be cutting up my plane's wings when I get it (I may try it later on, once I get to use it. I'm afarid I'll mess something up and I'll have a nice paper-weight, or have to buy an extra wing). However, I will try the dowel rod reinforcement. I'll experiment in steps, to put in simply.

As for the Wattage 400 Cub, I think I'd have to agree that since it's wood, it may not make for te greatest trainer. So I'll be sticking with the GWS Pico, I do believe. Thanks again, guys!

Nick R.
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