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Old Aug 13, 2005, 05:21 PM
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Orebro, Sweden
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Hacker Antares on Axi 2820-10 and 3s Lipos!

Iīve been slowly assembling a Hacker Antares 2,8m E-Glider for the last month (have had some health issues so the progress has been slow). Had opportunity to maiden it today, and I am very pleased with the plane. Sorry, I have no pics of my own Antares, but Iīve attached an official pic of it just to let you know what Iīm talking about.

Iīll return to the flightcharacteristics further down, but first Iīd like to adress a couple of issues that was brought to my attention before the maiden:
1. Iīve been warned that the wings are prone to flexing, and the ailerons prone to flutter at high speeds.
2. Another person warned me that it had a vicious tipstall, and that he had crashed it repeatedly due to the plane simply diving out of a banking turn into final aproach.

The flexing of the wings, and the fluttering ailerons I can confirm, but only when diving too steeply and too fast. I dove to make a fast roll from fairly high altitude, but built up a bit too much speed and all aileroncontrol went out the window. I was watching the plane doing an almost vertical rolling dive, with the ailerons fluttering like crazy. Fortunately I had enough altitude to pull out of the dive with the elevator when the plane rolled over right side up and that pullout quickly brought the speed down and let me regain aileroncontrol. Interesting and stressfull as this was, it turned out to be a non-event afterall, but it tought me something about the Anters preferred speed-envelope.

The stalls however is a non-event. I provoked the plane hard by holding up-elevator at low speed. I did this three times. Two out of those three times it stalled quite gently over one wing, and regained normal flight after half a turn. The third time it just dipped itīs nose gently and continued flying! I have to assume that the person who had problems with the stall-characteristics either had something else wrong with his plane, OR had only been flying very gentle R/E gliders before the Antares and simply slowed the plane down way too much causing a loss of altitude resulting in a crash.

Now over to a more traditional maiden report. I have an Axi 2820-10 with a 12X6 folder prop on it and power is supplied by a 3600mAh 3s E-Power Lipopack. AUW is around 1700gram.
Climbouts are vertical, and fairly fast. Iīm actually considering going with a slightly smaller diameter prop to lower the Amps a bit, but it certainly isnīt neccessary for either the ESC, motor or battery so weīll see about that (itīs kind of fun having the plane go ballistic straight up! ).

The flightcaracteristics are very good in my opinion. No, this plane isnīt meant for doing vertical dives from high altitudes and pulling out of the dive to do a supersonic flyby over the runway. The wings wonīt withstand that kind of abuse and WILL start to flex and flutter along with the ailerons. Instead, this is a great plane for hunting thermals. Before the Antares Iīve probably had the experience of riding a thermal on less than 20 occasions (partly because Iīm mainly into powered planes and havenīt learnt enough about finding thermals, partly because the gliders I have had/flown havenīt been true thermal ships, more of slope gliders). Today however I managed to catch a thermal on each and every of my 5 flights. While the weather certainly was favourable for thermals, I have to give the plane the main credit for that, it just so easy to tell when youīve found a thermal, just by looking at what the plane is doing (and once again, remember that Iīm pretty much a newbie at reading thermal activity).

Now, what Iīve written above may look as though the Antares is incapable of any aerobatics due to the restricted speed-envelope. I have to tell you that this assumption is wrong although the speed envelope certainly might seem restricted for someone expecting Hotliner performance. For thermal hunting and some fun aerobatics the speed it will withstand is more than enough. I looped, stall-turned and rolled the Antares and it did great. I also did a couple of highspeed (well, letīs call it semi-highspeed) passes and let it pull out sharply. It will fly inverted with a surprisingly small amount of down-elevator, and looses altitude at a surprisingly low rate while doing it even for extended inverted flights. There are no tendencies to snap, and elevator and rudder control was totally positive at all times. I wouldnīt want to stress the wing too much with extremely high-G manouvres, but slow and lumbering it AINīT!

The last flight of the day a clubmate asked if I would let him have a go at the Antares. Since heīs been showing some interest in Gliders in general and E-Gliders in particular I thought why not? This guy has only flown a GWS Pico Tiger Moth and a .40 sized ailerontrainer before, but after having tried out the Antares myself I didnīt think heīd get into any trouble.
I was right about that, he found the Antares a true delight to fly, and was surprised at how easy to control it was.

Looking for a hot E-glider with capability for blistering speeds? This one ainīt for you!
Looking for a very capable thermal hunter with quite a bit of aerobatic capability and looong duration? Look at the Antares, I donīt think youīll be disapointed.
Looking for your first E-Glider with the above caracteristics after having mastered your ailerontrainer? Look no further, I think the Antares is just what you need!

Anders O
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Last edited by Zeroaltitude; Aug 13, 2005 at 06:27 PM.
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Old Aug 14, 2005, 01:46 PM
Cheapskate freeloader!
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Orebro, Sweden
Joined Oct 2002
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Had another couple of wonderful flights on the Antares today. Also let yet another pilot test it out. Heīs a pretty experienced pilot, and has been flying both 3D and traditional aerobats for a few years now, but this was his first experience on anything resembling a glider.

The verdict is unanymous so far, the Antares is an extremely wellbehaved thermal E-Glider. Once again, the Antares is very good at telling you when it hits a thermal.
Only bad habit Iīve found is the fluttering of the wingtips and ailerons. I provoked it on purpose today to show the guys what I was talking about and they most certainly got the message. However, just like yesterday itīs only a matter of waiting until the plane is right side up in the "deathspiral" and aply up-elevator to let the speed bleed off. I suppose it could be done upside down also by feeding in down elevator, since the plane flies quite well inverted. But it feels safer doing it right side up as long as there is enough altitude to wait until it gets into that attitude.
Better of corse not to let it build up that much speed as to develop flutter and loss of aileron response, but Iīm still getting to know the plane and I feel it is good to really push it now rather than being surprised later.

Regarding the stallcaracteristics that I was warned about, I now have two people besides myself who has provoked a stall, and all three of us are very much in agreement: If set up correctly, this girl doesnīt want to stall in the first place, and when a stall occurs, itīs a VERY gentle dip forward or possibly a dip of one wing followed by half a spin which is enough to regain flying speed.
Now, as with ANY plane, even a slowflyer or a 2-channel polyhedral lightwheight glider, you do not want to stall to close to the ground, but compared to a lot of planes both gliders and powered planes, the stall of the Antares is extremely easy to avoid and extremely easy to handle once it does occur.

Ohh, the guys at the field today where quite impressed by the vertical climbrate as well as the general flightcaracteristics. I think I may have a few of them convinced to get E-Gliders!

Anders O
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Old Aug 27, 2007, 05:55 PM
Marx and Lennon
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NW Atlanta
Joined Jan 2007
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Antares crash on takeoff

Anders,
Hey, hur sto det il? (sorry about the spelling--supposed to be "hello, how are you.")

I read your post about Antares wing flutter and wanted to tell you about my recent experience. I bought the Antares from another club member. With the Jeti 30-3 and a 10-8 prop, I made my first flight attempt. It launched nice and level. I started a very gentle climb, and the wings started fluttering (my observer told me). Immediately, the Antares banked left. I added right aileron, but it did not respond. The plane continued left until it came down and struck the ground.

My friends all said that the wing was too flexible and prone to flutter.
Do you have any new information on the Antares?
Thanks,

Dave
Atlanta, Georgia USA
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Old Jun 18, 2008, 10:44 AM
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Old thread, but what tha heck. The original covers that you mount the aileron servos in is the main problem. They are too flexible and will tend to bake the whole servo flex at high speed. I have done my own in balsa that are reinforced with glassfiber. That works like a charm.
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Old Sep 04, 2008, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMag
Old thread, but what tha heck. The original covers that you mount the aileron servos in is the main problem. They are too flexible and will tend to bake the whole servo flex at high speed. I have done my own in balsa that are reinforced with glassfiber. That works like a charm.
Is this a problem to all Antares or only to the newer kits? I'm about to start building a Top Flight Antares. The kit is from 1983 or so. It's not electrical and I want to make it electrical. It's all build up balsa kit. Does this kit also has flatter issues?

Yoram
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Old Sep 04, 2008, 09:43 AM
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Clearlake, CA. USA
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Top Flight Antares

Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerPilot
Is this a problem to all Antares or only to the newer kits? I'm about to start building a Top Flight Antares. The kit is from 1983 or so. It's not electrical and I want to make it electrical. It's all build up balsa kit. Does this kit also has flatter issues?

Yoram

Hi Yoram, The above pictured Antares is not the same as the Top Flight Antares.... The TF is completely built up I believe and the above has a Fiberglass fuze... also the TF was not electricfied unless you did a conversion on it yourself.... ping if I'm not correct (anyone)?...


Best Regards,


Wylie Shaw
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Old Sep 04, 2008, 06:06 PM
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I know that they are not built the same. I wrote that I will make it electrical. It is not as per plan. I just wonder if the problems that the glass one has are also inherent to the kit-built one, aileron flatter, wing flatter and and maybe more. If yes, I would like to know before I start so that I can make changes as needed.

Yoram
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Old Mar 24, 2009, 12:24 PM
Marx and Lennon
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NW Atlanta
Joined Jan 2007
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Quote:
The original covers that you mount the aileron servos in is the main problem. They are too flexible and will tend to make the whole servo flex at high speed. I have done my own in balsa that are reinforced with glassfiber. That works like a charm.
MasterMag,
Thanks for the reply--sorry not to notice it until now.

Your tip is greatly appreciated. I'll include this mod to the plane during the current rebuild. I'm scratch-building a replacement wing center section this month and hope to get the Antares back in the air. BTW,the airfoil appears to be a true Clark Y with the curved forward undersurface. There's the slightest hint of down turning of the last 1" of wing, but I attributed it to manufacturing tolerances.

It's hard to find anything about this plane on the web. Would you know what type/color covering film would be a reasonable match to the semi-metallic, transparent blue? Not readily finding a match, I would tend to cover it with trans. blue MonoKote.

Thanks again for the tip and restart of this old thread.
Cheers,

Dave
(spring has sprung here in ATL)
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Old Mar 28, 2009, 03:10 PM
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I just bought a heavily modified Antares. The previous owner rebuilt the wings with carbon fibre spare and extra glass fibre. Even the fuselage was reinforced with carbon fibre. He thought the wings were a little bit "soft" from the beginning. Total weight with lipo is around 1.5 kg. Iīm so exited to begin thermal hunting.
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Old Mar 28, 2009, 05:00 PM
Marx and Lennon
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NW Atlanta
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Hello, drjoshua,

Congratulations on the "new" Antares! Sounds like all of those improvements will make the plane stronger and live longer. We would love to see a photo of it some time. Happy flying!

Dave
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Old Mar 28, 2009, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeroaltitude
The stalls however is a non-event. I provoked the plane hard by holding up-elevator at low speed. I did this three times. Two out of those three times it stalled quite gently over one wing, and regained normal flight after half a turn. The third time it just dipped itīs nose gently and continued flying! I have to assume that the person who had problems with the stall-characteristics either had something else wrong with his plane, OR had only been flying very gentle R/E gliders before the Antares and simply slowed the plane down way too much causing a loss of altitude resulting in a crash.
Well, the original warning you mentioned was specifially about tip-stalls, not about ordinary straight stalls. I've seen reports of sailplanes that exhibit unexpectedly different behavior in a "normal" stall and in a genuine tip stall. Moreover, I observed something like that in one of my sailplanes as well. (This might have something to do with specific setup parameters, like aileron differential settings and/or aileron-to-rudder mix.)

In order to test the tip-stall characteristics of your plane you have to stall it in a slow banking turn, just like the original warning said. The turn, i.e. the difference in the wingtip airspeed, is a requirement to test a tip-stall. From what you wrote above, it appears that you were testing a straight stall, which, again, might not be in any way indicative of the airplane's tip-stall behavior.
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