Espritmodel.com Telemetry Radio
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Old Oct 21, 2006, 01:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brett Scott
Wahoo! T-Hawk arrived a couple days faster than I anticipated. All the chargers are hummin! Tomorrow I'll hit the park armed with critical info from this forum. An evening here is like months of experience in the field. Thank all you pros for taking time to share your knowledge with us rookies.
This Fly-Rite buddy box has a plug that looks like a stereo mini-plug. Is it possible to hook this up to a sim?
Likely CRRCsim (http://crrcsim.sf.net) can use it directly without any adapters. See CRRCsim's site for more details. For me I just stick the buddy cord in my mic port, turn down the input levels a bit, calibrate it in crrcsim and fly.
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Old Oct 21, 2006, 03:27 PM
DivotMan
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Maryland
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Dumb Radio

Quote:
Originally Posted by caseih
Likely CRRCsim (http://crrcsim.sf.net) can use it directly without any adapters. See CRRCsim's site for more details. For me I just stick the buddy cord in my mic port, turn down the input levels a bit, calibrate it in crrcsim and fly.
This thing is a dedicated 'Student Console'. It doesn't generate a signal, it doesn't even hold batteries. Stick deflection just yields variable levels of resistance at the plug. I bet it works just like a PC joystick - just doesn't have the proper connectors. Hmm... Might be able to hack something together.
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Old Oct 21, 2006, 03:42 PM
DivotMan
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Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseih
Always move the rudder stick in the same direction as you move the aileron stick.
Pardon my ignorance, I always thought the rudder should be opposite the ailerons to keep the nose up and maintain altitude during the turn?
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Last edited by Brett Scott; Oct 21, 2006 at 03:56 PM.
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Old Oct 21, 2006, 06:47 PM
Promoting Model Aviation...
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United States, CA, Tehachapi
Joined Nov 2005
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I have to add:

1. Patience

2. If it didn't fly right the first time, sending it back up with "fixing" something won't solve anything and most likely lead to a crash. Planes don't fix themselves.

Frank
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Old Oct 21, 2006, 10:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brett Scott
Pardon my ignorance, I always thought the rudder should be opposite the ailerons to keep the nose up and maintain altitude during the turn?
I've never heard this before. I know that there is a manuever for losing speed and altitude that involves turning the rudder opposite the ailerons to effect a skew. For fun I do this on a turn and get the plane to fly very unnaturally.

What I meant, though, is that on a turn, you bank the plane slightly while applying some rudder in the same direction (a coordinated turn). You may not need to hold rudder throughout the entire turn, and you will need to have constant slight elevator. Anyway the problem I have is that my left thumb is lazy and stupid and often goes in the opposite direction. Does this make sense?

I can't think of any reason you'd ever want to apply rudder in opposite direction as your ailerons, except to correct something (IE pull out of a spin where the ailerons are stalled out on the one side). Are there other cases where you'd want to use opposite rudder?
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Old Oct 22, 2006, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseih
I can't think of any reason you'd ever want to apply rudder in opposite direction as your ailerons, except to correct something (IE pull out of a spin where the ailerons are stalled out on the one side). Are there other cases where you'd want to use opposite rudder?
There are times when opposite rudder is called for, but it is not necessarily away from the term. It depends on the manauver you are trying to execute, which might not be a turn.

If you are initiating a very steep turn you might use the rudder to with the ailerons initally but then apply a little opposite rudder to hold the nose up. In some respects this is like a knife edge around a turn. It may be small, but it may make a difference, depending on your plane.

I fly thermal duration sailplanes which ride on warm rising air called thermals. When working a thermal I want a fairly flat turn. I may initiate the turn with ailerons and rudder in the same direction. Then I may hold that turn with the rudder while applying opposite aileron to flatten the turn to provide maximum lift from the wings.

On landing you may need to have ailerons and rudder working opposite each other to crab the plane into a cross wind landing.

Considering all situations and not just basic turns, we can use the ailerons together or opposite.
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Old Oct 22, 2006, 06:46 PM
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Using the rudder in the turn is to avoid skidding the model about that turn
What is more important is to use some up elevator to stop the nose from dropping , the rudder is used for taxi and for aerobatics (ie) spin recovery.

On a crosswind approach using opposite aileron and rudder is called side slipping and keeps the nose of the model in line with the centre line on touchdown , crabbing is when you let it weather cock (ie) point into the wind but continue to track the centre line adding rudder at the flare to line up with the centre line , I would not worry to much about the rudder in the turn once you are using ailerons .

Hope this helps

Brgds
S
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Old Oct 24, 2006, 08:58 PM
Watching the Sky
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Maumee, Ohio
Joined Mar 2006
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Naming the plane on the Optic 6

Gnomedanny you make me feel stupid. I just read your post on how you name your planes on the Optic 6. I am always forgeting which channel a plane is set to. So I have been writing the channel number on the plane, but sometime I change the rx and then need to put a new number on the plane. Why did I not think of this when naming the plane.

Gene
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Old Oct 30, 2006, 01:32 PM
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Rio Rancho NM
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aeajr,
I started out on a GWS Beaver a few years back then moved to Bluecor profile foamies. Geez I thought this is pretty simple. All my flying was on calm days.

Then I built a Stevens Aero Diddlerod and again this stuff is pretty simple. Of course I was crusing all this around at 1/2 throttle & didn't fly in wind. And I was just doing lazy circles, 8's etc.

This year I built a Stevens Aero Squirt 400 and my problems began. If I fly it trimmed for level flight at 1/3 throttle on a calm day I'm ok. But speed and/or wind cause problems. Should I be leaving the plane trimmed this way and just use the down elevator to control altitude at higher speeds? Or should I be trimming to fly level at a higher speed and in the wind?
bill
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Old Oct 30, 2006, 02:32 PM
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You should not have to use significant trim changes at higher speeds. Naturalyl the plane will climb some with higher speeds as the wing generates more lift, but this should be easy to manage. Something is wrong.

You may be too nose heavy causing you to have too much up elevator to compensate for the nose heavy condition. This would lead to sluggish handling and a change in trim with speed.

Look at your elevator at your current trim. Is it up a little bit? That's your problem.

Try moving the CG back a little at a time and readjusting your trim.

Let us know how that works.
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Old Oct 30, 2006, 03:11 PM
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The elevator is down just the tiniest almost imperceptable bit when it flies straight & level at low speed 1/3 throttle. It really climbs on anything over 1/2 -2/3 throttle. This plane does seem to have a fair amount of incidence in the wing, perhaps 3 degrees. To keep the plane level with the stick neutral at 2/3 throttle I need maybe 1/16 down elevator.

Right now it balances at 30% of the chord. I'll try the CG shift and see if that helps. Forgive me a dumb question but wouldn't it be more prone to climb if it were tail heavy rather than nose heavy? Or am I missing something since my background is FF rubber stuff?

I'll be back later to talk about whether it could be lack of enough downthrust.
bill
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Old Oct 30, 2006, 03:33 PM
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Typically if it is nose heavy you will have to trim in up elevator to keep it from diving from the heavy nose. So, as you pick up speed, you feel that up elevator.

Based on your down trim, I would shift focus to the engine position. Is it pointed straight out or is it down and to the right? Typically you need some right and some down.

The other possibility could be caused by a stationary stab that is tipped up toward the back ( as opposed to a fully floating stab ) I had this problem on my Spirit sailplane. It is like having up elevator in the tail that has to be countered by down trim.
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Old Oct 30, 2006, 05:04 PM
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Thanks for the ideas. As soon as we get a little calm around here I'll do a bit of experimenting. Not as easy as FF where you can glide trim a plane.
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Old Nov 17, 2006, 12:33 AM
i stole gino's DP
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United States, IL, Kane
Joined Nov 2006
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[QUOTE=Jason Paul]Ed, I'm so new that I don't even have a plane yet.



me to
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Old Nov 17, 2006, 06:35 AM
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Jim.browne,

It is great that you are doing plenty of research before you get your first plane. There are many threads on first planes. I don't want to enter that discussion here as it is off topic. Let me just say that you have a lot of fun waiting for you.

Welcome!
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