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Old Sep 06, 2012, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by kerwin50 View Post
So these guys learn to fly on these little 3 channel planes and then when they want to fly the bigger 4 channel planes they have to learn to fly all over again because they never learned how to crab a plane in on a cross wind landing among other things
Learn to fly all over again? Hardly. In mode 2 the right stick is pitch and roll regardless of what surfaces you have. When you add the 4th channel you add independent yaw control.

Naturally, as one advances in their training they acquire new skills along the way. The great thing is that more people are learning faster than ever before. And they are doing it on their own without the need for instructors and buddy boxes. They learn to fly their planes and enjoy this hobby knowing there are new skills and new experiences waiting for them.

My feeling is that it is always better to have a coach ot instructor, but it is no longer mandatory for many pilots.

Wonderful, isn't. It?
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Old Sep 06, 2012, 11:41 PM
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Hmmm. I can see this topic is good fuel for a perpetual motion machine.
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Old Sep 14, 2012, 02:35 AM
buyer of the farm
United States, FL, DeLand
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Sure looks like it!

I wonder if the "if you start with 3-channel you have to learn to fly all over again" mob is actually organized or just a group of misguided individuals? They're EVERYWHERE lately.

The only possible problem is ground handling. A couple high speed taxis will convince you that you don't have to get all ham-handed on the rudder if the plane tracks right to begin with. When I first got my UM T-28 I did several high speed taxis in a parking lot, taking off to 18", dropping the throttle and letting her settle back down. I practiced low speed taxis with rudder and it was all good.

You know, if you hand launch you don't even have to bother with that. I only did it because it was fun and I thought it might be a good idea. Found with a properly set up landing gear there's no problem transitioning from 3-channel to 4-channel, even including the ground steering part.

Most things we worry about never happen!

Oh, my 3-channel Slow Stick is big. My 4-channel plane is micro! My first 3-channel plane was a 78" wingspan Radian. Hardly a "little 3-channel," and a darned capable flier.

Next up: the "you can't roll a 3-channel plane" brigade!
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Old Sep 14, 2012, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Rockin Robbins View Post
Sure looks like it!

I wonder if the "if you start with 3-channel you have to learn to fly all over again" mob is actually organized or just a group of misguided individuals? They're EVERYWHERE lately.

snip...
We have to recognize that we are a product of our time, our training and our experience. At the time that this person was learning to fly these are things he probably learned from his instructor. And perhaps, at that time, the rich selection of three channel "self" trainers were not available or as good as the are today.

I learned in a glider club. Many of the planes being flown by the experienced pilots were 2 channel gliders. To a glider pilot the idea that you have to have ailerons is quite absurd. And if you look at many of the 3 channel parkflyer type planes they have a LOT in common with 2 channel gliders. That is why they are so easy to fly.

And let us not overlook that a runway based flying situation will definitely benefit from a separate rudder control. If there is a steerable wheel it is often tied to the rudder or the rudder stick. Yes, you can have a steerable wheel on a 3 channel but having independent rudder gives you more control on the taxi and take-off.

So we have to look at these comments in the context of the person who made them. I would guess that they simply don't understand the world that we live in today where more and more pilots are learning on their own, away from clubs, away from runways and away from formal club training programs.

I am a HUGE advocate of clubs and learning in the club environment with a coach or instructor. As I say in my first post, if you are working with a coach or an instructor, follow their recommendations.

I still say that working with a coach or an instructor is the BEST way to learn to fly. They can help you overcome issues quickly, avoid getting into bad habits and greatly reduce your crash to flight ratio. However, if you are trying to learn on your own, the content of this thread may be helpful.
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Old Sep 14, 2012, 01:12 PM
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Thank you if I read your post before I flew my first fight I would't of had to repair my plane as much.
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Old Sep 16, 2012, 07:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aeajr View Post
5) Over control - Most of the time the plane does not need input from you.
So perfectly true ... and very neatly put into words!
I guess there's a natural tendency amoungst most beginners to "fly" the thing, when it's quite happy to do so without any externally applied meddling (as long as it's trimmed, as you rightly point out in the first post).

Great thread mate - though I'm not a beginner any more myself, I wish I'd read this a few years back

All the best,
Steve
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Old Sep 16, 2012, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by yarrumevets View Post
So perfectly true ... and very neatly put into words!
I guess there's a natural tendency amoungst most beginners to "fly" the thing, when it's quite happy to do so without any externally applied meddling (as long as it's trimmed, as you rightly point out in the first post).

Great thread mate - though I'm not a beginner any more myself, I wish I'd read this a few years back

All the best,
Steve
Naturally soe planes are more "self flying" than others. But the typical 3 channel R/E/Throttle trainer is very stable. One of my first demo flights is to get it flying straight and stable and then putting my hands out wide so they can see I am doing nothing, just watching it fly along on its own.
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Old Sep 16, 2012, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by aeajr View Post
One of my first demo flights is to get it flying straight and stable and then putting my hands out wide so they can see I am doing nothing, just watching it fly along on its own.
Yes, the "nothing up the sleeves" declaration - a very good idea!
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Old Sep 28, 2012, 03:43 PM
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RC Flight lesson 1 part 4 Hobbyzone Champ final lesson (12 min 47 sec)
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 11:30 AM
Which way is up?
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I am learning to fly on a Twisted Hobbys Pitts Biplane, first plane I ever flew. I can easily keep it airborne for a whole pack in calm wind. Anything over about 5mph and I have a little trouble yet. The thing with this plane is that it kind of "flys in the face" of convention, at least for a plane to learn on. I find I have to almost constantly be on the sticks with this plane, I have to use rudder to turn and keep the plane from rolling too much and or diving. Tricky, but fun.
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Old Oct 02, 2012, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by aeajr View Post
* Land before your battery cuts out
* Always land into the wind
* Plan your landing before you take off* Be sure you landing area will be clear when you land
How true, how true! I should (shall!) re-read this thread all over again!

Cheers
G.
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Old Oct 02, 2012, 10:06 AM
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Running Out Of Battery

It is highly unlikely you will truly run out of battery on your electric plane. What you may hit is the low voltage cut-off which will shut down the motor. This provides a safety factor in two ways.

1) It insures there will be reserve capacity to keep the receiver and servos working and the cushion for this can be quite substantal. You might have 30 minutes reserve after the motor cuts out. So you will have plenty of time to land. Don't panic!

2) For lipo packs, which don't like to be run down below a certain voltage, the LVC protects the lipo from being over discharged by the motor.

So, in order to be prepared to deal with the loss of your motor you should practice flying your aircraft with the motor off. Get it high then cut the power and just glide around. Get to know how your plane glides. See how long you can keep it in the air in a glide. This will teach you about the time you have available once you lose the motor due to LVC or a motor failure.

Note that if you have a brake feature on your ESC, stopping the prop will extend your glide time quite a bit. If you choose to turn on the brake, I recommend the soft brake feature if it is offered. Reduces the stress of stopping the prop from high speed.

Practice landing with the motor off. Power pilots call this dead stick landing. Glider pilots call this normal. Whichever you are, it is good to practice. This way, if you lose the motor for any reason, there is no panic. You have done this many times before.

Being prepared for a motor loss prevents this from becoming a panic situation. Practice when you have a full battery pack. Besides, it can be fun to glide around and challenge yourself to see how long you can do it. And if you hit a thermal you could discover a whole new aspect of flying that you had not considered, thermal soaring. It is lots of fun, and most electric planes, especially those with wing loadings under 15 oz/sq foot, can be thermaled. Above 15 oz you can still do it, it just gets harder.

Preparation and practice will turn a system failure into a "no big deal" situation. And practice with purpose will make you a better pilot.
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Old Oct 02, 2012, 11:23 PM
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+1

Although when the 125 pound P-47 that Frank Noll was flying last weekend had an engine failure while pointed straight up just a few hundred feet in the air I think everyone present suffered a little heart flutter!
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Old Oct 24, 2012, 07:01 PM
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question

When flying upwind, how do you supposed to land the plane while heading upwind? Wouldn't you have to go downwind some and then go upwind in order to land upwind and if that is the case then you can't keep plane upwind all the time. I just a little confused on this. thanks.

Chad
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Old Oct 24, 2012, 09:18 PM
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It's not that you should never fly with the wind, just that you should not let the plane get far downwind of where you stand.
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