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Old Mar 24, 2005, 08:42 AM
This is fun stuff
New Jersey
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Small electric C/L flying

I've finally gotten some successful 1/2A size electric powered C/L flying done. I was surprised at how much power it takes for true aerobatic flying. After trying electric motors on some all sheet balsa planes that had been powered with a Norvel .061, I went to sheet foam construction, similar to the many small R/C planes around, for lighter weight and more wing area. I'm using 32' .008 lines and tried several variations of powerplants. These are simple sheet profile airplanes as I've always enjoyed that type for casual, fun aerobatic C/L flying. C/L timers are available, motors and batteries are available in all sizes, I'd say there's no doubt that electric C/L is here and we'll be seeing more and more of it.
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Old Mar 24, 2005, 08:22 PM
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I would say that electric C/L flying is here to stay also. I have done some experimenting with ECL but on a much smaller scale. Although, I been working with what is known as "rat racing" in my 1/2A electric control line. I am using custom, 15ft lines with an airplane that has a 18" wingspan, S280 direct drive motor w/ a 4-cell 650mAh NiCd pack on board. What size motor and battery pack are you using for your 1/2A electric? It is nice to know that others are interested in ECL.
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Old Mar 25, 2005, 05:49 AM
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Lightweight powerful and not too expensive CD rom brushless conversions seem perfect for C/L use. Are you using battery on board or pack on the belt?
Rick
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Old Mar 25, 2005, 09:50 AM
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New Jersey
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I don't think power down the lines will ever be an option for real, lively aerobatic performance. It takes a lot of power for even a small aircraft, more power than can go down small lines, not to mention the line insulation problems. I think at least 35' lines are necessary for decent aerobatics. I don't think a CDrom type motor would be enough power. I'm flying 30" wingspan models with Razor or HiMaxx brushless motors in a GWS 350 gearbox, or a Motor Max brushless outrunner direct drive. Using 3-cell LiPo batteries. A motor setup that will easily hover a 16 oz R/C ship will barely fly a 10 oz C/L airplane.
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Old Mar 25, 2005, 10:14 AM
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I guess that would have to do with line drag?
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Old Mar 25, 2005, 10:50 AM
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New Jersey
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I assume it's the line drag. Surprised me how much electric power was required for aerobatic C/L flying. But I am using low tech flat plate profile airframe construction. With a Norvel .061, such planes perform great. I'm flying the electrics on 35' .008 cable lines.
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Old Apr 08, 2005, 02:25 PM
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Knxville TN
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Thanks '1957Chevy' for the two very informative articles in the May 2005 issue of Flying Models. Great information for what will be needed to fly control line in an urban environment. Hopefully some new C/L sites will come from this.


Chris Stoddart
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Old Apr 08, 2005, 07:34 PM
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Australia, ACT, Canberra
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I saw ECL aerobat kit from http://www.buzzflight.co.uk/ , all their models are power down the lines as somone put it. I'm starting to learn CL, as I bought a small trainer with lines and a DC Sabre engine.

Peter
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Old Apr 09, 2005, 03:09 AM
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I've flown a couple of Buzzflight models. They only fly successfully on very short lines, around 6m (20ft). The trainer is brilliant for giving kids a first shot at C/L. They don't seem to mind that the lap times are a bit fast . But as Mr Chev implies you need much better reflexes than mine to fly anything like aerobatics on such short lines .

Steve
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Old Apr 09, 2005, 07:27 PM
Fix all the things!
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Thinking of power down the wire ECL, another though has hit me. I did some RTP(round the pole) flying a few months back. My friend who was quite a veteran of that area explained that we just about needed double the voltage of the motors to get enough power to the motor, due to line resitance(enamel coated copper). Prehaps that's another major fator in the problems of down the wire ECL. Just another thought.

Peter
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Old Apr 10, 2005, 03:31 AM
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Yes it is and the two factors combine to make things worse for you. If you use thick enough wire to avoid too much volt drop you get terrible drag so you need more power. If you decrease the wire size you have less drag but you lose most of the power in the wires, so you need more power.

This has been discussed in this forum many many times now, but I always hope someone will come up with a new idea that might make it workable .

Steve
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Old Apr 10, 2005, 08:56 AM
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Copper wire obviously isn't strong enough for any serious C/L aerobatic flying, and stranded steel cable in our sizes won't carry much current. You can only go so high in voltage for safety and to work with commercially available motors and ESCs. And the insulation requirements. Today's brushless motors, ESCs, C/L timers, and LiPo batteries are so available and pretty easy to make weight competitive that I'd think it's just not necessary to wish for power down the lines. Electric C/L flying is here for those that want to do it. It may be considered expensive but the stuff is available.
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Old Apr 23, 2005, 04:19 AM
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This is the best I've seen so far. Those are some cool photos.
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Old Apr 28, 2005, 01:58 PM
D W
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Where to get the timer/low voltage cut-off that is nec. for saving the LiPos? I threw together a Sterling trainer but the NiCad's proved too heavy. It may (or may not) work with LiPo's but have to prevent deep discharge.
I think EC/L will be the next big thing in our hobby.

Sent an E-mail to JM Piednoir as per your FM article. Awaiting reply.
-David-
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Old Apr 28, 2005, 06:07 PM
This is fun stuff
New Jersey
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You can get the JMP timer direct from France or from his rep in the US, www.bsdmicrorc.com/
You can get the Z-tron timer from Windy at www.windyurtnowski.com
BUT you have to use an ESC to use either timer. Most ESCs have a low voltage cutoff, better ones are adjustable so you can set the ESC cutoff to protect a LiPo pack. The timers will not work without an ESC.
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