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Old Mar 05, 2013, 05:18 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
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SIG 1/6 scale Clipped Wing Cub Build Thread

So, today I picked up my Cub from the post office and unpacked it! It looks cool, It will be my first kit build. I have built lots of foamies, but no R/C kits (I have built 2 freeflight kits). I willl be updating this build thread as I go, which I can't promise will be really quickly, but I want to finish it before school ends in June. As far as power goes, I've decided on electric, with most of the components coming from Hobbyking (but not the receiver. I think I'm going with an ar600 on this one). So, stay tuned I guess as I start to build it. I will probably need some help along the way, and if you have any tips for me, I'm all ears!

Also, here's my unboxing video:
SIG 1/6 Clipped Wing Cub Unboxing (5 min 48 sec)
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 05:55 AM
Registered User
United States, KY, Taylorsville
Joined Mar 2010
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These build very lightweight and fly nicely! Ditch the kit 'flex' hinges and use 'real' pinned hinges. The hardware is nice otherwise.
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 09:13 AM
Visitor from Reality
United States, VA, Arlington
Joined Dec 1996
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Hi Jeremy
I built the clipwing version of this kit a few years back for e-power. The motor I used came with the kit - it was done for a kit review/electric conversion magazine article - and isn't around any more. It flew on three and four cell LiPo packs and a four cell A123 pack - say from 350 to 450W.

Things you may care to keep in mind:

It's an old die-cut kit. Though very accurate and easy to build, like all Sig kits, it is a little hefty in structural weight.

An electric motor is lighter than the typical glow engine the Cub was designed for. So look to locating the battery and RC gear well forwards and do all you can to keep the tail end light. I had the battery on a ply tray on the fuselage floor right aft of the firewall, the ESC under the cowling, though I did put the servos in the fuselage bottom at the aft end of the cockpit area.

The 'scale' cabin entry door makes for a good battery access area. Cubs could legally fly with the opening entry window removed or latched up under the wing - that makes a good cooling air exit for a model. Hinge the lower door so you can drop it down, and you can then reach into the cockpit and remove the battery .

One small servo per aileron with leads back to the cockpit area is a lot less fuss than the 'dated' kit aileron drive. You can either Y lead the two servos or transmitter mix separately channeled aileron servos.

Have a look at the tailwheel assembly. Mine had a commercial one, sorry can't remember the make, that looks a little more like the 'real thing'. Most important - the springs driving the tailwheel from the rudder disconnect any tailwheel shocks - groundlooping,etc - from the rudder servo.

Main undercarriage - the kit gear is very stiff and prone to bouncy landings. Several folk have posted hereabouts concerning fitting the sprung landing gear from the E Flite ready-made Cub - http://www.e-fliterc.com/Products/De...ProdID=EFL4625 to the Sig 1/6th kit. That model's UC is, it seems, available at a reasonable price and is a good working sprung scale version of the full size's gear.

Colour scheme. The Cub is about the only machine ever made that looks good in yellow. However, there are other paint jobs! Mine was taken from a clipwing Cub that flew 'The world's shortest runway' airshow trick, taking off and landing on a 'runway' atop a large panel van. Last heard of, it was in a hangar in Florida, awaiting major repairs...

One last suggestion. Figure out how and where you are going to fit your motor, battery, ESC and RC gear before you get stuck in to building. You don't want to be sitting looking at a nearly finished model and wondering 'now, how do I get the battery in and out and why is it so tail heavy?'.

Great model, good luck with your electrocution.

D
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 09:22 AM
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United States, WI, Slinger
Joined Mar 2006
498 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARUP View Post
These build very lightweight and fly nicely! Ditch the kit 'flex' hinges and use 'real' pinned hinges. The hardware is nice otherwise.
Does it even have flex hinges? The Astro Hog I'm building shows the flex hinges on the plan but in fact included Sig Easy Hinges.

Good luck on the build.


Mike
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 09:36 AM
Flying Low
cbarnes0061's Avatar
United States, VA, Petersburg
Joined Mar 2012
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 09:55 AM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dereck View Post
Hi Jeremy
I built the clipwing version of this kit a few years back for e-power. The motor I used came with the kit - it was done for a kit review/electric conversion magazine article - and isn't around any more. It flew on three and four cell LiPo packs and a four cell A123 pack - say from 350 to 450W.

Things you may care to keep in mind:

It's an old die-cut kit. Though very accurate and easy to build, like all Sig kits, it is a little hefty in structural weight.

An electric motor is lighter than the typical glow engine the Cub was designed for. So look to locating the battery and RC gear well forwards and do all you can to keep the tail end light. I had the battery on a ply tray on the fuselage floor right aft of the firewall, the ESC under the cowling, though I did put the servos in the fuselage bottom at the aft end of the cockpit area.

The 'scale' cabin entry door makes for a good battery access area. Cubs could legally fly with the opening entry window removed or latched up under the wing - that makes a good cooling air exit for a model. Hinge the lower door so you can drop it down, and you can then reach into the cockpit and remove the battery .

One small servo per aileron with leads back to the cockpit area is a lot less fuss than the 'dated' kit aileron drive. You can either Y lead the two servos or transmitter mix separately channeled aileron servos.

Have a look at the tailwheel assembly. Mine had a commercial one, sorry can't remember the make, that looks a little more like the 'real thing'. Most important - the springs driving the tailwheel from the rudder disconnect any tailwheel shocks - groundlooping,etc - from the rudder servo.

Main undercarriage - the kit gear is very stiff and prone to bouncy landings. Several folk have posted hereabouts concerning fitting the sprung landing gear from the E Flite ready-made Cub - http://www.e-fliterc.com/Products/De...ProdID=EFL4625 to the Sig 1/6th kit. That model's UC is, it seems, available at a reasonable price and is a good working sprung scale version of the full size's gear.

Colour scheme. The Cub is about the only machine ever made that looks good in yellow. However, there are other paint jobs! Mine was taken from a clipwing Cub that flew 'The world's shortest runway' airshow trick, taking off and landing on a 'runway' atop a large panel van. Last heard of, it was in a hangar in Florida, awaiting major repairs...

One last suggestion. Figure out how and where you are going to fit your motor, battery, ESC and RC gear before you get stuck in to building. You don't want to be sitting looking at a nearly finished model and wondering 'now, how do I get the battery in and out and why is it so tail heavy?'.

Great model, good luck with your electrocution.

D
Wow, thanks for the advice! The electronics will be here Friday. I chose a turnigy g32 for the motor with a 4s 4000mah lipo. Does the wing come off?

As far as colouration scheme, I chose the sunburst blue scheme.

I will be having 2 servos for aileron, and plan to put them in the wing. Do you have to reinforce the rib you put them in?
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 11:17 AM
Visitor from Reality
United States, VA, Arlington
Joined Dec 1996
12,788 Posts
HI Jeremy
Your motor choice sounds like it will give you a fair amount of power, as in, you may have to use a slightly smaller prop and be gentle on the throttle. Mine had smaller capacity packs, around 2300 or 3000mA and I got long enough flights, even though I flew it more like a clipwing'd Cub than a regular winged one

The wing does come off, but not only does it have two bolts in usual fashion, you also have to undo the wing struts at their fuselage ends. The small bolts are accessed from underneath.

I had a lot more modelling space then, let's say mine often was left in one piece between flying sessions.

Aileron rib mounts. The rib from mainspar to rear spar or TE is 'doubled' with Liteply and cut out to accept the servo. Small strips of Liteply on the inner face of the rib give more secure anchorage for the servo screws. Holes are cut into the ribs inboard of the servo mount rib, for the extension lead to pass through. I use circular holes and a rolled paper tube to make getting the leads through a little easier. The hatch is nothing more than 1/16" balsa sitting on a ledge made of oddments of scrap balsa strip. On my clipwing, I put the servo out to where the arm is in approximately similar location to the control arm on the full sized Cub.

Nice colour scheme.

Hope that helps
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 02:28 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dereck View Post
HI Jeremy
Your motor choice sounds like it will give you a fair amount of power, as in, you may have to use a slightly smaller prop and be gentle on the throttle. Mine had smaller capacity packs, around 2300 or 3000mA and I got long enough flights, even though I flew it more like a clipwing'd Cub than a regular winged one

The wing does come off, but not only does it have two bolts in usual fashion, you also have to undo the wing struts at their fuselage ends. The small bolts are accessed from underneath.

I had a lot more modelling space then, let's say mine often was left in one piece between flying sessions.

Aileron rib mounts. The rib from mainspar to rear spar or TE is 'doubled' with Liteply and cut out to accept the servo. Small strips of Liteply on the inner face of the rib give more secure anchorage for the servo screws. Holes are cut into the ribs inboard of the servo mount rib, for the extension lead to pass through. I use circular holes and a rolled paper tube to make getting the leads through a little easier. The hatch is nothing more than 1/16" balsa sitting on a ledge made of oddments of scrap balsa strip. On my clipwing, I put the servo out to where the arm is in approximately similar location to the control arm on the full sized Cub.

Nice colour scheme.

Hope that helps
Ok, thanks. So you had a hatch on the fuselage, on the bottom underneath where the wing was? And that's how you would install your battery?

The aileron construction makes sense now, thanks.

Also, a question about what adhesive to use. Should I be using white glue, 5min, epoxy, 30 min epoxy? I see the thread in this forum about that and people are recommending titebond. Is this better than your average white glue?
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 03:31 PM
Visitor from Reality
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Joined Dec 1996
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Battery's on the fuselage floor, on a ply plate just big enough to take it - it's fastened with Velcro. I put the battery in and took it out via the 'cabin door' on the right hand side of the fuselage, under the wing. Hope the attached photo shows it well enough. It was a bit of a fuss to get at the battery, but at least I could do it with the model right way up - have never been a fan of fuselage bottom battery hatches, where you have to flip the model over to extract the pack.

I sold this model when we moved a long way three years ago, and gave the plan and instructions to its new owner. Can't honestly remember if the kit had the scale opening entry door or I did it myself. Its much the same as Sig's 1/5th Cub, however I got there.

It was much easier with the A123 four cell pack. At the time, I still had my field charging set-up - a 100AH deep cycle lead acid battery - and recharged the A123 pack in the model. DO NOT EVEN THINK ABOUT DOING THAT WITH LIPOS!

The underside hatch on the fuselage was to get to the inverted rudder/ele servos. It was much easier to access the servo arms and control runs with the servos there than poking around with them right way up in the bottom of the cockpit.

Glue. I go with Titebond II these days. It works fine and I use it for pretty much all the wood to wood joints.

Epoxy is reserved for joining unlike materials - metal to wood, for example. I mostly use 30 minute epoxy, to allow lots of working time. Even though it says '30 minutes', I'll aim to leave it overnight as it doesn't really completely set up in 30 minutes

CA almost gets used like a building pin you can leave in the job! One snag with CA - it hardens balsa up considerably where it soaks into the wood. So if you use it on soft-ish balsa that will later be sanded to, say, an outside curve, you will be sanding what amounts to extremely hard wood around that joint but surrounded by very soft wood.

Hope that helps

D
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 04:38 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dereck View Post
Battery's on the fuselage floor, on a ply plate just big enough to take it - it's fastened with Velcro. I put the battery in and took it out via the 'cabin door' on the right hand side of the fuselage, under the wing. Hope the attached photo shows it well enough. It was a bit of a fuss to get at the battery, but at least I could do it with the model right way up - have never been a fan of fuselage bottom battery hatches, where you have to flip the model over to extract the pack.

I sold this model when we moved a long way three years ago, and gave the plan and instructions to its new owner. Can't honestly remember if the kit had the scale opening entry door or I did it myself. Its much the same as Sig's 1/5th Cub, however I got there.

It was much easier with the A123 four cell pack. At the time, I still had my field charging set-up - a 100AH deep cycle lead acid battery - and recharged the A123 pack in the model. DO NOT EVEN THINK ABOUT DOING THAT WITH LIPOS!

The underside hatch on the fuselage was to get to the inverted rudder/ele servos. It was much easier to access the servo arms and control runs with the servos there than poking around with them right way up in the bottom of the cockpit.

Glue. I go with Titebond II these days. It works fine and I use it for pretty much all the wood to wood joints.

Epoxy is reserved for joining unlike materials - metal to wood, for example. I mostly use 30 minute epoxy, to allow lots of working time. Even though it says '30 minutes', I'll aim to leave it overnight as it doesn't really completely set up in 30 minutes

CA almost gets used like a building pin you can leave in the job! One snag with CA - it hardens balsa up considerably where it soaks into the wood. So if you use it on soft-ish balsa that will later be sanded to, say, an outside curve, you will be sanding what amounts to extremely hard wood around that joint but surrounded by very soft wood.

Hope that helps

D
that picture is a huge help thanks!

as far as glue goes, my hardware store doesn't carry titebond. They have probond, lepage and their home hardware brand. Any opinions on those? I currently have simple IKEA white glue, but I don't know if the bond strength/drying time are ideal.
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 07:15 PM
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United States, KY, Taylorsville
Joined Mar 2010
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MikeCr- Jeremy has a pic of self holding those plastic flex hinges or whatever they're called. Jeremy, yellow wood glue from the hardware store works fine. I like using DUCO, Ambroid or Sigment (similar) glue, too. As far as keeping the tail end lightweight consider laminating strips of bass or balsa around a foam (blue foam works well) form. It is just as strong but lighter than building up the pieces from the kit. Just depends upon how much 'bashing' you want to do. Dereck's advice is pure gold! I've 'bashed' one of these into a Super Cruiser. I covered it with Koverall. It is lightweight.
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 07:29 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARUP View Post
MikeCr- Jeremy has a pic of self holding those plastic flex hinges or whatever they're called. Jeremy, yellow wood glue from the hardware store works fine. I like using DUCO, Ambroid or Sigment (similar) glue, too. As far as keeping the tail end lightweight consider laminating strips of bass or balsa around a foam (blue foam works well) form. It is just as strong but lighter than building up the pieces from the kit. Just depends upon how much 'bashing' you want to do. Dereck's advice is pure gold! I've 'bashed' one of these into a Super Cruiser. I covered it with Koverall. It is lightweight.
Ok, thanks for the advice about the glue.

As far as modifying the tail with foam, I think I will use the regular balsa tail as per the plans because this is my first big kit, so I want to make sure that I dont' mess anything up. I will definitely try to make the tail as light as possible though.

Also, I've been reading that the approximate AUW for one of these can range from as light as 3.5 lbs to 4.5 lbs... does that sound about right?
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 07:33 PM
Visitor from Reality
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Joined Dec 1996
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ARUP - you have it in one, go laminate! The pinnacle of laminated outlines is probably the Lazy Bee - I have participated in several non-government funded crash testings of Lazy Bee laminated outlines with great satisfaction. Way better than sticking lots of cross grained pieces of die-cut balsa together to form a hefty outline. I did my 1/6th Cub as per the kit as it was for a magazine review, but the next Cub - I seem unable to stay away from them - gets lightweight laminated curvy bits.

Attached are some photos of various Cubs and laminated outlines. Just for inspiration, honest.

D
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 07:58 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
So, I have started building! Not much, but it's a start. Tonight was the first time I really got to look at the kit. It has 2 Laser Cut sheets and 8 Die-cut sheets. These sheets contain the wing and stabilizer ribs mostly. The kit does include bellcranks for the ailerons, which I won't be using. I will be using the aileron in wing rib method as described by derek above.

Tonight I glued the laser-cut wing tips together, as per the first step in the instructions. The next step is to glue them into something that resembles a wingtip, so I hope I'll be able to get that done tonight as well. That's it for now. For this I just used regular white glue, but I will go to the hardware store tomorrow to get some yellow glue that will probably be much better.
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Old Mar 06, 2013, 08:02 PM
Visitor from Reality
United States, VA, Arlington
Joined Dec 1996
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Parts cutting looks to be much better than I recall in the one I built.

One of those tissue templates looks like the front windscreen. It not only wraps around side to side, the top rolls back over the fairing in front of the wing mount former, as I recall.

Just noticed where you live. I used to live near Cambridge, though probably a slightly older one though...

D
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