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Old Feb 15, 2013, 07:56 PM
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United States, NH, Windham
Joined Feb 2013
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Newbie wants a Corsair with no flight experience

Hi All,

Add me to the list of newbies, who are deperate to have a war bird as their first plane. I did a search for this question, but either my specific question hasn't been covered, or my search fu is weak, but here goes.

As stated earlier, I've never flown an RC plane before, many cars, a beginner dual main rotor heli, but no planes.

I've been flying on a Real Flight Simulator for a few months now and can fly and land pretty much everything up to the war birds, pretty easily. Still working on duct fan and turbine planes, but I'm not at the point where I can recover them easily and land them without damage at will.

If I can fly and land planes on this flight sim as described, what plane should I start with?? I'm not opposed to buying more than one plane (a trainer now and a war bird soon after), but on the sim, I actually find the war birds easier to fly. How does this flight sim translate to the real world??
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Old Feb 15, 2013, 09:47 PM
Arrowhead
Joined Dec 2010
1,302 Posts
If you're not opposed to getting a trainer, I would say go that route. The simulator helps, but it's no replacement for "real world stick-time".

Normally I'd suggest a 3-channel trainer, unless you're buddy-boxing with an instructor. Hobby Zone Super Cub is a good choice. If you really want to go the 4-channel route... I'd suggest the ParkZone T-28.

Also, if you haven't already, be sure to play around with the environment settings in the sim. Increase wind speed, turbulence, etc. It still won't perfectly replicate the real world, but you'll definitely have to work harder to avoid a mishap.
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Old Feb 15, 2013, 11:07 PM
Most people are stupid!
dambit's Avatar
Australia, QLD, Gold Coast
Joined Oct 2011
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As long as you understand that you WILL crash your first plane, and that your first lessons will actually be in repairing, you'll be fine

My first rc plane ever was a small 650mm wingspan Bf-109 belly lander. It was great and only took me about 2 weeks of every afternoon flying to master. I did break it in half on my second flight, but it was easy to repair (with hot glue) and was back in the air the next day.

I don't recommend this method for everyone, but for me it was a great way to learn. It was a fast and twitchy plane, easily thrown around by the wind, but those were valuable lessons that would have taken months in a "trainer" to learn.

Good luck and have fun

Steve
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 12:03 AM
A disaster in the making.
United Kingdom, England, Selby
Joined Jan 2013
379 Posts
Hi I'm a relative noob too. I was / am in the position where I know no one who flies rc but wanted to start out without driving miles to join a club as I live in a rural area with lots of open space.
I bought a HZ cub and despite dire warnings of impending doom I threw it into the air and flew it ok without crashing, landings were nose over affairs in the long grass but no damage. The over the top advice I received, on another UK forum almost put me off rc for good.
I did have the advantage of being a one time PPL so had to study aerodynamics and the mechanics of flight so I guess that helped me a lot, however it does not help to get the feel of the a/c.

I now have a skyraider and will maybe maiden it this morning. It may well crash, it may not, time will tell. I treat it as a disposable training item and when I do have the experience to fly with a modicum of skill will build another out of better quality parts rather than keep repairing the old one.
If you can walk the walk of shame with head held high and your ego lets you be honest with yourself you will be fine. Your plane may not, but they are hardly items requiring a mortgage to replace.

Your plane, your choice, your attitude. Best of luck.


EDIT: I got up for a couple of minutes and crashed it breaking the wing and the prop. Glue is setting on the wing as I speak but a new wing is very inexpensive, so I'm going to order 2 as the shipping is a bit on the expensive side.
A bit poorer but a bit wiser - main difficulty is seeing a grey airplane against a misty sky at 400 yards or so - it got a bit far away due to my not keeping ahead of the A/C. It all went lairy from there and ended up in a death spiral. I found orientation when it showed me its underbelly but by then it was too late........
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 06:07 AM
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Redhood's Avatar
United States, MN, Odin
Joined Aug 2010
368 Posts
Jim,

I think if you can find a first generation Parkzone Corsair that would work well for you. It flies well at slow speeds. I flew mine as a belly lander and it was terrific. Also after you get comfortable with it you can put a speed .25 from heads up rc in it and tear up the sky. The larger motor took it from a trainer feel to a real fighter.
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 06:35 AM
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United States, NH, Windham
Joined Feb 2013
36 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by CF105 View Post
If you're not opposed to getting a trainer, I would say go that route. The simulator helps, but it's no replacement for "real world stick-time".

Normally I'd suggest a 3-channel trainer, unless you're buddy-boxing with an instructor. Hobby Zone Super Cub is a good choice. If you really want to go the 4-channel route... I'd suggest the ParkZone T-28.

Also, if you haven't already, be sure to play around with the environment settings in the sim. Increase wind speed, turbulence, etc. It still won't perfectly replicate the real world, but you'll definitely have to work harder to avoid a mishap.
I've read that the Parkzone T-28 and Corsair fly nearly identically, can anyone enlighten me on this??

Again, I have no issue with getting a trainer plane, I actually kind of like some of the Cub/Super Cub Trainers, but I definitely want something larger and 4 channel.
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 07:18 AM
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taz101's Avatar
Australia, QLD, Oxenford
Joined Oct 2010
2,161 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimJr15 View Post
I've read that the Parkzone T-28 and Corsair fly nearly identically, can anyone enlighten me on this??

Again, I have no issue with getting a trainer plane, I actually kind of like some of the Cub/Super Cub Trainers, but I definitely want something larger and 4 channel.
You could always try a Bixler/Skysurfer. 1400mm, 4ch, belly lander.
This plane has probably been a big trainer plane. I started with one and now have 17 planes, mostly warbirds. I had a little bit of sim time but found that it is nothing like the real thing!!(My personal opinion).
My Bixler was destroyed in a mid air with a gas Zero, I replaced it straight away as it is such a good flyer. I still take it to the park everytime I go flying.
It's easy to repair "when" you crash (and you will crash), as the motor is not in the nose. So when you crash it, the motor and prop usually survive.
My second plane was a 1400mm Cessna, the the next was a T-28. I just took little steps .
First step-Trainer glider style high lift high motor.
Second step- high wing trainer.
Third step - low wing trainer.
Forth ster - PZ spitfire.
Now I can fly just about anything!
Plus you can always use the Bixler/Skysurfer later to try FPV.

LURCH
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 07:39 AM
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underbird's Avatar
United States, WI, Pewaukee
Joined May 2011
11 Posts
I have both the pz t28 and first gen corsair. They do fly very alike. The t28 is a bit easier and better imo.. Once I mastered it I maxed out the control horns and its nice and aerobatic.. Avoid the second gen corsair because it looks heavier.

the white gorilla glue works nice for repairs and is lighter than Horsley

the bixler is what I started my brother on. Very versatile and no runway required.. Crashes repair faster because of the motor location
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 07:52 AM
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pda4you's Avatar
USA, TX, Trophy Club
Joined May 2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimJr15 View Post
Hi All,

Add me to the list of newbies, who are deperate to have a awar bird as their first plane.
Yep we all want to fly cool warbirds first - but ask yourself a question. In WW2 do you think they took pilot candidates and stuck them in a Corsair for their first flight?

Obviously No.

They stuck them in trainers - with a flight instructor.

Many full scale pilots feel RC flight is actually MORE difficult than flying a full scale.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JimJr15 View Post
As stated earlier, I've never flown an RC plane before, many cars, a beginner dual main rotor heli, but no planes.
This helps with the control dexterity and they "backwards" issue you face in RC aircraft. But now you have to add speed - an that is a pretty challenging issue. That is why trainers help - they allow you to get a slower experience and you can react. Important.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimJr15 View Post
I've been flying on a Real Flight Simulator for a few months now and can fly and land pretty much everything up to the war birds, pretty easily. Still working on duct fan and turbine planes, but I'm not at the point where I can recover them easily and land them without damage at will.
Good that helps a great deal - but SIMs are not totally realistic but they do help!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimJr15 View Post
..., what plane should I start with?? I'm not opposed to buying more than one plane (a trainer now and a war bird soon after), but on the sim, I actually find the war birds easier to fly.
You should start with another plane. You will get proficient enough for the Corsair - just wait a bit - just like the WW2 pilots did. They actually flew many different planes before the F4U.

Good trainers include:
Super Cub (3ch but still good)
Champ - awesome self teach plane but needs calm days.
Bixler/SkyScout/many other names - fast but the prop is not in the front so it takes TONS of abuse.
GWS Slow Stick - My favorite - it is slow and forgiving

Mike
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 08:08 AM
Most people are stupid!
dambit's Avatar
Australia, QLD, Gold Coast
Joined Oct 2011
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Sometimes I think people forget that these are not real planes, they are small toys (at this park flyer level anyway), and they don't require methodical training regimes to become proficient with them.

Everyone I know who started with a trainer has taken ages (months to a year in some cases) before that are proficient. And some of these guys fly everyday. On the other hand everyone I know who jumped in the deep end so to speak and started with a small warbird, was proficient within a few weeks.

This is just my observation over the past few years. I'm not pushing this on anyone, but just thought I would share.

Cheers,

Steve
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 08:13 AM
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United States, FL, Satellite Beach
Joined Jul 2012
524 Posts
If you go to the beginner forum you will see a bird called the Albatross by Crash Test Hobby. I would recommend whichever size you wish. I have one and use it to train the family and others at our field. It is very tough "EPP", easily repaired, and can easily be modded to have ailerons. It is a FUN airplane with 10min run times off a 1300mah 30c 3s. If you want a Warbird really bad Dynams 1200mm series are some of the easiest warbirds around to fly. I would suggest not to get the P51 tho as it was the first in that line and needs some mods to fly decently. Dynam learned from that one tho and the rest are great. However I have seen many ParkZone Wildcats, and they are great first time warbirds, are belly floppers and therefore no landing gear to take care of.
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 08:29 AM
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Canada, BC, Port Coquitlam
Joined Apr 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimJr15 View Post
I've read that the Parkzone T-28 and Corsair fly nearly identically, can anyone enlighten me on this??

Again, I have no issue with getting a trainer plane, I actually kind of like some of the Cub/Super Cub Trainers, but I definitely want something larger and 4 channel.

Jim, I like your attitude, that is, you know and accept that you should start with a trainer. A proper trainer is mandatory for 99% of student pilots. There is the odd student pilot who is a natural RC flyer who learns on a "hotter" model, but let us assume you are not that fortunate.

The PZ T28 is easy to fly. I have flown one for a short time and it is as many people say, easy to handle. Easy is relative. For experienced pilots, anything is easy to fly. All I can say is it is not the ideal first trainer. It will be a great second plane, or advanced trainer, however. Buy one if you must if only to satisfy your desire for a warbird. But hang it on the wall until you are totally comfortable flying your first trainer, which is ideally a high wing 3-channel or 4-channel.

Your flight simulator experience is a big help. A sim's biggest benefit is the fact that it teaches you "orientation", which is knowing which way to push the stick in order to make the plane go in the direction you want to go. It also teaches you to be gentle on the controls and not to freeze. It also helps to give you the correct reflexes and muscle (thumb and forefinger muscles) memory.

A sim is exactly what it is, it just simulates real life. An RC sim is nowhere near the sophistication of full size F-18 or 747 simulator, yet a course in those simulators does not earn a pilot his wings. He still needed to start on a trainer.

A sim will give you a better chance of surviving your first flight and this alone is huge help. You still have to accept the inevitable fact that sooner or later, you will crash during your learning process. Well, life is a learning process...I consider myself a decent pilot and I crash all the time

There is merit to the large trainer, i.e. they can buck the wind better, they usually have more gentle manners and are more stable. Of course, being larger, they stay in sight longer. Down side of large models is their higher initial cost and I believe that they inspired the saying that "the bigger you are, the harder they fall"

FWIW, I did learn on a large 60" wingspan balsa Midwest Products Aristocat. Not many choices in trainers at the time, unlike today. If I were to do it all over again, my approach would be different.

On the other hand, small trainers are less expensive, less stable, more easily affected by wind and can fly out of sight quicker. On the plus side, they can be flown in smaller fields. Their smaller mass makes them almost indestructible and when they do get damaged, they are easy to repair and parts are cheaper to boot. Gyro stabilization has become a common feature, so that makes them equal to or better than large models, in terms of stability and resistance to being blown about by the wind.

Having said all that, my suggestion is to avoid the large/small extremes and go for the happy medium....a three channel mid-size trainer from 900mm to 1200mm wingspan. Say, a HobbyZone SuperCub (1200mm) or Ares Gamma 370. The Gamma costs less than the SuperCub and it is an cheap/easy upgrade to an aileron wing. These are the two best entry level trainers, IMO.

Further note on the Gamma. Let me repeat what Chucksolo suggested re: Gamma. Buy the Gamma Pro version with the brushless motor and aileron wing, but buy the non-aileron wing as well and start with that. Save the aileron wing for when you get better. This is a cheaper and way better alternative than buying the regular non-aileron Gamma with its brushed motor then buying an aileron wing.

Oh yes, read up as much as you can regarding setting up the model properly, i.e. control surface alignment and throws and so many other little details that are invisible to the beginning RC pilot. Read all the stickies on top of this Beginner's Forum.
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 08:32 AM
Registered User
Perth, WA
Joined Jul 2006
459 Posts
Go for it, my "real" first rc plane was parkzones T-28 (had only flown 2channel years before) maidened in 15+ knots of wind, my legs and hands were shaking...

5mins after scooting around the sky fighting the wind and several landing attempts I got her down in one peice after which I was hooked.

I finally crashed it 1yr+ later due to poor eye sight...
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 08:32 AM
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United States, FL, Satellite Beach
Joined Jul 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dambit View Post
Sometimes I think people forget that these are not real planes, they are small toys (at this park flyer level anyway), and they don't require methodical training regimes to become proficient with them.

Everyone I know who started with a trainer has taken ages (months to a year in some cases) before that are proficient. And some of these guys fly everyday. On the other hand everyone I know who jumped in the deep end so to speak and started with a small warbird, was proficient within a few weeks.

This is just my observation over the past few years. I'm not pushing this on anyone, but just thought I would share.

Cheers,

Steve
Agreed Dambit, plus imho starting on 4 channel or at least putting the rudder on the rudder stick for 3 channel birds, then quickly moving to 4 channel is better than flying 3 channel on the aileron stick for any length time. I did the deep end jump as well. Would suggest having at least 2 birds though since crashing/fixing is going to occur.
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 08:46 AM
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United States, CO, Firestone
Joined Jun 2008
10,609 Posts
first gen parkzone corsair easy to get parts belly land it don't worry just fly. t-28 isn't as good to me as the corsair in slow turns. only one way to learn sometime sink or swim i started with a p-51 not the best way to go i did learn a lot about glue lol
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