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Dynam RC Gee Bee Y PNP from Nitroplanes.com Review

This big, beautiful, receiver-ready EPO model comes with a price tag about the same as many bare airframes...and even less than some micros! Bargain price, meet top-dollar performance.

Splash

Introduction


Dynam RC Gee Bee Y
Wingspan:50" (1270mm)
Weight:49.5 oz (1250g)
Length:45.8" (980mm)
Wing Loading:13.8 oz/sq. ft. (42.2g/sq dm)
Construction:Expanded polyolefin airframe; composite propeller; plastic servo control horns; aluminum propeller collet; aluminum wing struts; fiberglass wing support tube, steel pushrods; carbon fiber horizontal stabilizer spar; foam-over-sheet steel landing gear with plastic wheels, plastic attachment supports and foam tires; clear plastic windshield, plastic pilot bust; plastic dummy radial engine
Servos:Four Detrum 9g analog
Transmitter:Airtronics SD-6G six-channel computerized spread spectrum aircraft
Receiver:Airtronics RX600 six-channel spread spectrum aircraft
Battery:2DogRC.com 2200mAh 3S 65C lithium polymer with Deans Ultra-Plug connector
Motor:Dynam BM3715A-KV900 brushless outrunner
Propeller:Dynam 12x6E composite
ESC:Detrum 40A brushless with proprietary connector
Minimum Operator Age:14+
Minimum Operator Skill Level:Intermediate
Manufacturer:Dynam RC Hobby Co., Ltd., Building C-2, Nanshan Industry Park, Yantian, Fenggang Town, Dongguan City, Guandong Province, China
Available From:Nitroplanes.com
Manufacturer's Catalog Number:DY8955
Distributor's Catalog Number:60A-DY8955-GB-ARF

In the spirit of giving credit where due, I have to give a lot to the good folks at Nitroplanes.

This Los Angeles-based distributor has worked hard to bolster its reputation and is a proud sponsor of this site. They've done it with a combination of ongoing incremental improvements to customer service and a lineup of improved products at prices which rival overseas vendors. Further help is in no small part due to a very attentive and hard-working PR manager.

When Nancy Chung, public relations manager not only of Nitroplanes but of Hobbypartz.com, NitroRCX.com and Xheli.com contacted me in order to ask if I'd like to review a new addition to the Nitroplanes lineup, I told her that I'd be honored to do so. I'd done a review of one of their Exceed RC outrunner motors a couple of years prior and I found the company to be a delight to work with on projects like this. That model is still flying high with that motor, by the way.

One of the improved products is the EPO foam Dynam RC Gee Bee Y which is available in both RTF form with a Dynam 2.4GHz sport radio and battery and the PNP version in this review, ready for the modeler's choice of receiver and battery. Dynam identifies the model on the shipping box as a PNP; Nitroplanes describes it as an ARF.

It's also a screaming deal at only 119 bucks. For less than the price of some transmitter-ready micros, you get a fifty-inch-wide sport plane with classic 1930's air racer looks, not to mention four of Dynam's Detrum brand servos, a smooth running Dynam 900Kv brushless outrunner and a Detrum 40-amp ESC installed and ready to rumble. There's even a pilot figure, one of the best I've seen and oddly enough, a rarity in the RTF/ARF/PNP world.

Dynam even throws in an extra propeller.

My sample happened to be a PNP (or ARF) version which will be guided by the fantastic Airtronics SD-6G six-channel computer radio. Mike Greenshields of Global Hobby Distributors in Fountain Valley, California not only made this great system he helped design available for review not long ago, he also was generous enough to forward an RX600 full-range receiver for this review.

In either configuration, all of the major assemblies and electronics installations simply need to be brought together with little time or effort.

Time to get assembling and flying after a quick history of the prototype.

Prototype

When I hear the term "Gee Bee," I automatically think of the oddly proportioned R-series. In the 1930s, Granville Brothers Aircraft was responsible for far more than just that iconic racer as evidenced here.

Dynam's model depicts NR718Y, a Granville Brothers Gee Bee Model Y Senior Sportster of which only two were built. NR718Y was custom built in 1931 for the E.L. Cord Corporation to serve as a test bed for their 215-horsepower (160kW) Lycoming R-680 radial engine, the first ever Lycoming brand aircraft engine.

The plane was later sold and modified with a 670-horsepower (500kW) Wright Whirlwind radial with no modifications to the airframe and without the knowledge or approval of Granville Brothers.

In 1933, pilot Florence Klingensmith flew NR718Y in the Chicago Air Races, becoming the first woman to compete in that race. One day after her 29th birthday, Klingensmith died in the aircraft when fabric ripped from the fuselage during the race as she passed by the stands. She immediately veered off the course, flew steady and level due south in an attempt to either safely bail or land in a plowed field a couple of miles away, but the loss of the fabric proved to be too much for the aircraft, causing it to nose into the ground before she could bail from the cockpit.

Though neither of the originals survives, a replica of NR718Y was built by Ken Flager between 1970 and 1984 and is powered by a 300-horsepower (224kW) version of the 1931 Lycoming R-680.

Kit Contents

Virtually everything needed to get the Gee Bee in the air in very little time is included:

  • Fuselage with preinstalled servos, Y-harness, pushrods, motor and ESC
  • Wing halves with preinstalled servos, pushrods and ailerons
  • Preassembled landing gear
  • Fiberglass wing tube
  • Horizontal stabilizer with preinstalled carbon fiber reinforcement
  • Vertical stabilizer with preinstalled tailwheel
  • Spare propeller
  • Fully decorated pilot figure and adhesive
  • Full hardware package with phillips screwdriver, metric allen wrench and contact cement
  • Pressure sensitive decals
  • RTF version includes a Dynam radio system and flight battery

Needed to complete assembly are the following:

  • Four-channel or greater 2.4GHz aircraft radio for PNP version
  • 2200mAh 3S lithium polymer battery with a minimum 20C discharge rate for PNP version
  • Modelers' choice of connectors to replace the proprietary battery connectors if desired
  • Metric ruler or electronic caliper for measuring screw sizes
  • Thirty-minute epoxy to mount the tail in lieu of the inadequate factory mounting screws; more on that later

Based on what I saw when this model hit my doorstep, Dynam does one heck of a job packaging their products for export. A sturdy shipping box surrounds a beautifully printed display box which contains...more boxes.

All of the airframe components and hardware except for the wing joiner are first bagged in heat-sealed plastic bags and placed within their own boxes. Other than an ever-so-slightly crushed left wingtip and some even more slight crushing of the rearward foam tips of the landing gear, everything looked terrific.







Terrific, but bright. Really bright.

The famous Gee Bee tomato red was replaced by something closer to a fluorescent red with black outlines not evident on the historical photo, or for that matter, on recent photos of Gee Bee replicas. That color scheme mixed with the yellow(!) wheels of the landing gear prompted my wife Lilli to dub the Gee Bee as "The Cartoon Plane."

She's right; I can easily picture a wonderfully garish Technicolor cartoon featuring a plane colored in a scheme such as this.

Tex Avery or Robert Clampett would have had a blast. Here in the real world, I didn't expect visibility to be a problem.

Camouflaged, it isn't. It also lacks a clear coat, so unless it's handled and stored very carefully, hangar rash is going to be a given. It feels as if the paint will rub off with the slightest scrape, but that may simply be the matte feel and finish of the red paint. Time will tell, but I do plan to be careful.

Assembly

Wing

Since virtually everything is done at the Dynam factory, there's only a bit of assembly needed to ready the wing and attach it to the fuselage.

That final assembly is made all the easier by an excellent manual. All too often I've complained about illegible and/or badly translated manuals. This isn't one of them.

The landing gear go on each wing half first with what are listed as "PWA3*10mm" screws. Since there are no scale drawings depicting the actual size or shape of such a screw, the ruler or caliper will come in handy.

And so it did; there were eight 10mm screws, four in each of the two hardware bags.

As for those landing gear itself, there is an exceedingly beefy looking metal tab sticking up from each plastic mounting bracket. That tab is the top of the landing strut itself, laser cut and surrounded by the EPO fairings and wheel pants.

In fact, so surrounded are the wheels that they cannot be removed. They spin freely on the axles, but if one or both of the foam tires is damaged, it means a whole new set of landing gear. This isn't quite as bad as it might sound; Nitroplanes stocks a full line of reasonably priced replacement parts and a new set of landing gear is just over US$12.

Besides, they didn't break when I bounced a landing later on, so I'm not worried.

The struts didn't quite fit flush with the underside of the wing at first. No right or left is indicated on the gear, their shipping bag or the manual, but the two are ever so slightly different. Swapping the two solved the problem.

After the fiberglass connecting tube is inserted in place between the wing halves, the aileron servos are plugged into the preinstalled Y-harness of the RTF version. On the ARF, the harness is simply plugged into the aileron and rudder servo leads for shipping purposes. Use of the Y-harness will certainly make easy work of removing and reattaching the wing for transport if desired, but I decided to take advantage of the mixing capabilities of the Airtronics SD-6G radio, opting to plug the ailerons into separate channels and mixing them accordingly once the receiver was installed.

Besides, with four mounting screws holding the wing in place and eight more holding the struts which triangulate the wing to the fuselage, I'm guessing this model is best left assembled, but individual storage needs will dictate whether or not it comes apart. Mine dictated that it would.

The wing and its fiberglass stiffening tube attach to the fuselage with four 3x35mm machine screws which can be driven with a #2 phillips, but not before one takes the time to change out the power connector on the ESC and, in the case of the RTF, the power connector on the battery.

Wing stiffness certainly was no concern. Between the dense EPO, the tube, the struts and factory installed carbon fiber spars, the Gee Bee may have one of the stiffest foam wings in any similar model at any price.

At first glance, the connector appears to be a clone of a SuperTigre ST connector. ST to Deans Ultra-Plug adapter harnesses are a standard off-the-shelf item at any Hobbico dealer or a part which can be easily ordered. I have one on the Flyzone Switch I reviewed for the AMA, allowing me to use my Deans-equipped packs with that model's ElectriFly ESC.

Trouble is, the connector is not an ST. The shells don't quite line up and even if they did, the pins would not. The ST connectors have two male or two female pins. The Dynam connector has one male and one female, so it would have to be replaced by a Deans in order to match my batteries. An adapter can likely be furnished out of bullet connectors and a preassembled Deans male harness should one wish to do so.

I had to do all the soldering while resting my The Jigs Up soldering jig on the underside of the fuselage itself while it in turn was resting on my Robart styrofoam work stand. I had a very good reason for not first removing the ESC.

The cowl is glued in place.

I thought it might have been magnetically attached, but no. It's actually glued in place on a model aimed squarely at experienced pilots!

Sorry, Dynam. That issue really deserves to be corrected, the sooner the better. Should a modeler wish to attempt a removable cowl, the replacement part less the dummy radial (packed, oddly enough, with a replacement windshield) is under six bucks.

Tail Assembly

The tail and horizontal stabilizer go on next; since the stab is keyed for a snug fit underneath the tail, there's no need to triangulate it with the wingtips. There are also two pushrods for the elevator, one for each half. It's an ingenious setup and one which allows for accuracy in flight, adjustability and leaves off a joiner. It's a wonderfully useful bit of extra added value engineering and one which almost makes up for the glued-on cowl.

Almost. I wish I could get that cowl off!

The manual appears to show a tail section with control horns already attached; such is not the case.

Figuring out which horn went where was easy enough. One was packaged by itself for the rudder and two were packaged together for the elevator.

Here's where I did a really silly mistake along with an important discovery.

The silly mistake came about with the installation of the rudder horn. I screwed the screws through the backing plate and when they simply slid through the holes in the horn on the opposite side, Your Dear Reviewer chalked it up to a manufacturing error, using a couple of spare 2mm nuts and a dab of blue Loctite to hold them in place.

When I realized my own error in reversed logic a moment later, I literally laughed out loud and set about correcting it.

I didn't laugh for very long, thanks to the important discovery.

The Loctite reacted with the plastic and almost violently so, causing it to crumble in my fingertips as I removed it.

Big oops.

I found a new nylon horn of similar size in my parts bin less the screws, but the screws supplied with the model worked fine. The mounting holes lined up with those in the rudder, but the horn was 90 degrees off. Some careful measuring and two new holes later and the nylon part was in place with only the original lower mounting hole showing as a result.



It might be too obvious to point out the fact that I did not repeat the mistake with the right and left elevator horns. There really is a right and a left as evidenced by the holes in the elevator halves as well as the horns themselves.

I liked the idea of using nuts as I'd originally tried to do with the rudder, so I dug up and installed two more 2mm nuts.

No Loctite this time.

Tail Installation

Step six says to attach the tail with two 2.3x20mm screws, which was far easier said than done.

The holes are incredibly deep, requiring a long screwdriver. Even then, I spent a good half an hour fiddling with stuck screws and several attempts to get the screws to engage.

I'm going to save you, dear reader, from the frustration I underwent and tell you right here and now to chuck any ideas you might have about attaching that tail with a couple of screws barely long enough to engage the mounting bushings.

The tail and the keyed-in stabilizer are a good, snug fit in the fuselage, but two little screws were not going to hold that assembly in place in flight.

The solution was simple enough: Thirty-minute epoxy. That tail is on to stay.

Another possibility is the contact cement supplied as part of the hardware package. It isn't indicated anywhere in the assembly process and it may have very well been included for just this reason, but I wasn't sure how secure it would set. At least I knew how strong the epoxy would be.

Two 2x6mm screws, not to be confused with the 2.5x6mm screws used to hold the wing struts in place, are used to hold the metal tailwheel guide plate.

The plate didn't quite fit because the bend holding it in place on the tailwheel strut itself contacts the plate when trying to align it to the fuselage.

After a bit of bending, there is no interference and the rudder works smoothly, but this is just another easily avoided error on the part of the factory.

Radio Installation

Steps 8 and 9 are the rudder and elevator pushrod installations respectively. Easy enough, but I had doubts as to the servo alignment, so in went the receiver.

Connecting the Airtronics RX600 receiver was a snap, but the servo plugs are a really tight fit. There's plenty of room to mount such a small receiver and to properly route its aerials. I used a small piece of Parma servo tape to hold the receiver in place and a few small pieces of clear packing tape to hold the aerials in the proper configuration.

Once the receiver was bound, all of the servos snapped to attention, but none of the arms were even close to being centered. At least the motor turned in the proper direction; accessing the ESC in order to swap two of the wires would have been close to impossible. The ESC is in fact programmable, but motor direction isn't a programming option.

Centering the rudder and elevator servo arms was as simple as removing and remounting them in the proper configuration, but the ailerons were a sadly different story.

Not only were the arms not centered, but the clevises seemed to be screwed onto the pushrods with no concern whatsoever for proper alignment.

The arms weren't off by much, but the servos were not going to come out without serious damage to the wing.

Since I'd chosen to operate the ailerons on separate channels, I was able to electronically center the arms. The pushrod on the right aileron was fairly close, but the left wasn't even in the same universe. Those clevis pins are firmly snapped into place, making me very glad that I had an Align 250-class helicopter ball link removal tool.

This is yet another avoidable issue. Any amount of assembly time savings is totally negated because of this. Dynam, either center the servos and properly adjust the pushrod lengths or save all of us the time and effort and leave the aileron servos unmounted. Simply slapping things together doesn't help anyone.

Completion

That being off my chest, attaching the wing struts, applying the decals, setting the control throws and installing the propeller with its excellent collet and weighted attaching nut complete the model. Recommended throws are 12-15mm of rudder and elevator and 15-20mm for the ailerons. I went with the high side of the recommendations, adding more rudder throw prior to the maiden flight in order to increase the steering on the ground. Exponential was set at 20% for the aileron and rudder and 25% for the elevator.

The decals are an odd mix of the number 7 racing numbers, semi-scale N-numbers, Gee Bee tail logos and even some "NO STEP" decals for the tops of the ailerons. Others were the Dynam logos (a no-no on any scale subject in my opinion) and a few other weird decals proclaiming 2.4GHz operation, warning triangles for near the prop and a decal indicating how to open the battery hatch.

Some other scale decals would have been welcome and there are plenty of photos of the prototype from which to fashion them.

Offsetting that issue was the pilot bust. It's expertly detailed and comes complete with a small tube of foam-safe CA to mount it in the cockpit. Perhaps it's nitpicking to say the goggles should have been placed over the eyes, but the bust adds a real scale punch regardless of the goggles.

Flying

Getting started

Center of gravity for the Gee Bee is between 50 and 55mm back from the LE of the wing, balancing perfectly with the 2DogRC li-po in place directly atop the factory applied Velcro strip.

Lateral balance was right on the money as well. Assembly hiccups notwithstanding, this was shaping up to be a very well-engineered model where it counted.

After a range check, I found the ground handling to be quite good, but as mentioned earlier, the recommended rudder throw didn't allow for very much steering. I prefer more rudder throw over less anyway, so a quick tweak of the EPA setting on the Airtronics SD-6G gave me some within moments.

One could not ask for a better flying day at the Coachella Valley Radio Control Club in Thermal, California. Club videographer George Muir was on hand once more to capture the maiden flight of the Gee Bee.

I wasn't able to fly the model prior to getting together with George, so if this flight were to fail, it would do so spectacularly and on video.

It didn't.

I taxied out, pointed into the wind and punched the throttle. The Gee Bee was off like a shot, lifting the tail almost immediately and tracking with only slight tail wag from the motor's torque before lifting off the runway.

The first few moments were spent keeping the nose up since the trim was off a bit and I didn't want to fiddle with the trims while a brand new model was airborne. In it came for its first landing; this model really wants to stay airborne! I didn't expect a Gee Bee to glide like this one did. The first couple of attempts I made at flaring out only served to put the model back in the air.

Those metal plates which serve as landing struts coupled with the foam tires made for a slightly springy first landing and a slightly scuffed wing tip, nothing which didn't clean up later.

Back up it went, just as dramatically as before and flying almost hands off. I guided the Gee Bee around the pattern a few times, completely at home with the controls and due in no small part to the rock-solid control of the Airtronics radio.

I flared early once more on the second landing, sending the Gee Bee rebounding skyward once more. The final attempt right after that bounce was far better. I just left some power on, gradually brought it down with throttle and elevator and throttled back full when it touched down. Smooth landings are indeed possible, but they're going to require some practice on my part.

In other words, it lands easily but doesn't land itself.

Aerobatics/Special Flight Performance

Since this is more of a scale sport plane than a full-house aerobatic monster, the Gee Bee will nevertheless pull off some beautiful rolls with little or no need to bump the elevator. The first roll I attempted was done simply by pointing the nose upward and hauling the stick over. Perfect.

Since the lateral balance is so good, it tracks through loops with no effort. Combine a half loop with a roll and get ready for some beautiful Immelmann Turns. These aren't shown during my video since those first two flights were spent merely getting a feel for the model, but I took it up a third time after George left and gave them a shot. Nitroplanes' own YouTube video is embedded below and will give a fine idea of the real capabilities of this model and what I'll likely be doing with my example after a few more flights.

What is shown in my video is a brief flirtation with inverted flight. Fly inverted it will and quite nicely with minimal down elevator needed.

I don't plan to end on quite the inverted "oops" in the Nitroplanes video, however. That really has to be seen in order to fully understand that statement.

All this for 119 bucks plus battery and receiver of choice. Impressive? You bet.

Is This For a Beginner?

A four-channel model of a circa 1931 high-performance air racer is most assuredly not a beginner's plane. It's stable to be sure, at least from an experienced pilot's point of view. But, like any model of this configuration, it has none of the forgiving, self-righting abilities of a trainer.

This one is best left to an intermediate pilot with some aileron experience at the very least.

Flight Video/Photo Gallery













Downloads

Here's Nitroplanes' own video, complete with the "oops" I mentioned a bit earlier:

Conclusion

To say that I was impressed with the Dynam RC Gee Bee Y is something of an understatement. It shows a mix of excellent engineering and construction with the truly strange (read the glued-on cowl and the screw-on tail).

It's big, beautiful, impressive in flight and still manages to come in about $50 less than a lot of bind-and-fly micro aircraft.

This beauty gets two thumbs way up. I was going to give it slightly less because of what I consider to be major issues such as the cowl and tail, at least before I flew it.

What more than made up for those issues aside from the fantastic flight characteristics were the overall goodness and quality of this model despite the bargain basement price and the fact that Nitroplanes has Dynam's ear since they're such a major distributor. I discussed the issues with Nancy Chung and she has assured me that they will be addressed.

In all fairness, no issue I raised is anything which can't be addressed at the factory level for future production runs or by a modeler for the current production run.

I'm looking forward to practicing landings sooner than later; I expect to be doing some terrific touch-and-goes before long!

I am indeed grateful and honored to be chosen for this review. Nitroplanes is a big player and public relations manager Nancy Chung represents them with real class. She is truly fun to work with and I look forward to doing so again soon.

Another big player who represents his company and this hobby with overflowing class is Mike Greenshields of Global Hobby. Mike is never more than an email away (or maybe two if he's busy) when a component is needed for a review such as this one. I thank him for the umpteenth time for that terrific Airtronics SD-6G radio and for the RX600 receiver.

The batteries I used were the 2200mAh 65C units sent to me by Mark Grohe from 2DogRC.com for a review of same which I did not long ago. They're a perfect match for this model, needing only a swap from an EC3 connector to a Deans Ultra-Plug.

Though she doesn't review these products, RCGroups.com administrator Angela Haglund works almost nonstop behind the scenes to get these reviews up and running. She's also the liaison between us and many of the distributors and manufacturers who provide these product samples.

Our thousands of readers world wide are the main reason we do what we do. All of us here at RCGroups.com thank you for making this the biggest hobby-related website on the internet!

Pluses and Minuses

Lots of pluses here, including:

  • Fantastic flight characteristics
  • Quick and easy final assembly
  • Incredibly low price
  • Lots of power
  • Excellent manual
  • Looks and flies like a model which costs a lot more
  • Triple-stiffened wings
  • Dual pushrod elevator eliminates twisting and slop
  • Horizontal stabilizer is keyed in place, resulting in perfect alignment
  • Excellent pilot figure
  • The spare propeller is a very thoughtful touch
  • Well packaged
  • Full and affordable parts support through Nitroplanes
  • May well be one of the best deals on a model plane anywhere regardless of price

Of course, a few minuses were noted, but none which would keep me away from this model:

  • Trying to screw down the tail was nearly impossible and might not have held with screws alone even if I were successful in doing so, but the tubes of contact cement supplied with the model may have been the fix
  • Misalignment of the tailwheel hold-down plate
  • Some odd decals which should have been replaced by more prototypically accurate ones
  • Paint job is too bright compared to the prototype and the pinstriping is too wide
  • The proprietary battery connector meant having to remove and replace it with a more common one
  • The plastic servo horns are chemically reactive with threadlocking compound
  • The linkages were slapped together with no regard for centered servos or control surfaces, resulting in extra work; the firmly glued-in aileron servos made it impossible to mechanically center the arms
  • Do I really have to mention that cowl once more?
Last edited by DismayingObservation; Dec 06, 2012 at 02:43 PM..

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Old Dec 12, 2012, 10:06 AM
Lysdexic I'm
HeeBeeGeeBee's Avatar
Spring, TX
Joined Oct 2010
1,385 Posts
Excellent write up and review Ralph. For the price, I may just have to add one to the hangar. I'd sure like to have a knock-about Gee Bee to grab and go. I have to wonder if the issues about the non-centered servos and control rod issues will be addressed soon or should one wait. Anyway, for the price, it seems to be a heck of a deal.

Thanks for the great review,
HBGB
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Old Dec 12, 2012, 10:34 AM
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DismayingObservation's Avatar
Southern California
Joined Feb 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeeBeeGeeBee View Post
Excellent write up and review Ralph. For the price, I may just have to add one to the hangar. I'd sure like to have a knock-about Gee Bee to grab and go. I have to wonder if the issues about the non-centered servos and control rod issues will be addressed soon or should one wait. Anyway, for the price, it seems to be a heck of a deal.

Thanks for the great review,
HBGB
You're welcome...and I dig your screen name!

Nancy assured me they would in fact be addressed, but as to when, I couldn't say. Even if it were addressed now, there are still a lot of kits like mine in the pipeline.

If you use a radio which can be programmed with separate aileron channels, that's the way to go. I'm getting full aileron deflection, so that's good news. It would be far more difficult to align with a Y-harness setup.

At worst, use of a Y-harness would mean arms that are adjusted as straight as possible with the proper aileron alignment set at the pushrods. There's a lot of throw in those little servos, so someone with a four-channel sport radio could still get this model flying and banking just fine.
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Old Dec 15, 2012, 06:01 PM
Thanks Wilber and Orville !.
sonic liner's Avatar
San Jose Cally
Joined Jan 2004
1,047 Posts
The cowl isent glued on. We have three of these. Remove the prop and pull on the cowl while rocking it left to right..........it will come off.

Pete
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Old Dec 15, 2012, 06:30 PM
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Southern California
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Originally Posted by sonic liner View Post
The cowl isent glued on. We have three of these. Remove the prop and pull on the cowl while rocking it left to right..........it will come off.

Pete
I'll give it a try, Pete. I thought I'd given it a good twist but it seems as if I might not have. If I get it off, I'll let you all know.
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Old Dec 15, 2012, 09:31 PM View Post
dfgesdfwe
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Old Dec 16, 2012, 04:14 PM
Thanks Wilber and Orville !.
sonic liner's Avatar
San Jose Cally
Joined Jan 2004
1,047 Posts
Nice write up BTW

The motor wires werent connected on one of mine so I thought I was doomed....LOL. The paint was dry underneith, but the cowl hangs up on the flat paint. Once you have it off, use this opportunity to remove the flash between the two lower most radial heads. I just sliced straight down with a razor blade from the back. This lets cool air into that tunnel in the bottom of the firewall. You can also heatshrink the bullet connectors together now for insurance.

I pulled forward while rocking left to right to get them off. Please have someone hold the beast from the inside of the plane with hatch removed.

Happy holidays !

Pete
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Old Dec 16, 2012, 10:07 PM
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Southern California
Joined Feb 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonic liner View Post
Nice write up BTW

The motor wires werent connected on one of mine so I thought I was doomed....LOL. The paint was dry underneith, but the cowl hangs up on the flat paint. Once you have it off, use this opportunity to remove the flash between the two lower most radial heads. I just sliced straight down with a razor blade from the back. This lets cool air into that tunnel in the bottom of the firewall. You can also heatshrink the bullet connectors together now for insurance.

I pulled forward while rocking left to right to get them off. Please have someone hold the beast from the inside of the plane with hatch removed.

Happy holidays !

Pete
Ah, good point. I didn't think that it might have been painted on. Still, I'm certain this will be addressed by Nitroplanes.

I almost forgot since I was hurrying to answer via an iPhone: Thanks for the compliments, thanks for the help and happy holidays to you and yours!
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Old Dec 17, 2012, 07:38 PM
We got some flyin' to do!
Justwingit's Avatar
United States, CA, Fort Irwin
Joined Apr 2012
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Nice review Ralph!

I'm on the edge of biting; so many wonderful Golden Age models coming out now. I've been waiting over a month for my Monocoupe; maybe I'll order one of these and it'll get to me quicker !

How's the speed? Not that I'm gonna be burnin' up the skies with this thing, but it was an Air Racer after all.....

Also, nice to see Tony and the gang at Nitroplanes aren't ashamed to show goof-ups. That's not the first time they've shown mistakes at the field and it demonstrates a little humility. Something I don't recall the other major SoCal importer doing....ever. Now, if I'm mistaken, please feel free to show me the light, as it were.

I'm definitely buying one, not if, just when. Looks like a great, four-channel model.

BTW, someday I gotta get down there and check out your flying field...you're right down the street from us here in the high-desert !

Cheers and thanks again for the wonderful write-up!
John
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Old Dec 20, 2012, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Justwingit View Post
Nice review Ralph!

I'm on the edge of biting; so many wonderful Golden Age models coming out now. I've been waiting over a month for my Monocoupe; maybe I'll order one of these and it'll get to me quicker !

How's the speed? Not that I'm gonna be burnin' up the skies with this thing, but it was an Air Racer after all.....

Also, nice to see Tony and the gang at Nitroplanes aren't ashamed to show goof-ups. That's not the first time they've shown mistakes at the field and it demonstrates a little humility. Something I don't recall the other major SoCal importer doing....ever. Now, if I'm mistaken, please feel free to show me the light, as it were.

I'm definitely buying one, not if, just when. Looks like a great, four-channel model.

BTW, someday I gotta get down there and check out your flying field...you're right down the street from us here in the high-desert !

Cheers and thanks again for the wonderful write-up!
John
Love to have you down here, John! Thanks for the compliments. Hopefully, you'll get a chance to swing by during an event. Might have to return the favor someday since I have family in Hesperia.

It isn't smoking fast, but it's certainly no slouch. It really has some grunt on takeoff as shown in the video. Without crunching numbers, I'd assume an eyeballed number somewhere in the 55 MPH neighborhood.

I agree that Tony from Nitroplanes is marvelously candid in his review videos; he isn't afraid to show some of the warts.

As I pointed out myself, nothing here is beyond repair at either the factory or end user levels. Nancy herself just told me once more that the R&D folks at Nitroplanes are going to immediately tackle the issues of the cowl and the tail.

I'm just looking forward to flying it again since wind and schedule haven't allowed a return trip to practice smoothing out those bouncy landings.

If you have a computerized radio that you can use to electronically adjust the ailerons, go for it.
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 05:01 PM
Kevin
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The Guy from that OTHER SoCal shop does crash one... look at the Biplanes tab... Staggerwing Beechcraft flight video.... seems to have radio trouble
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Last edited by Radical RC; Dec 27, 2012 at 05:01 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 06:13 PM
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I stand (sit actually) corrected!

Pete actually does stuff one on video...sounds like he lost power right before it went in...too bad but nice to see they didn't edit it out.

Thanks for catching that and pointing it out
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Old Dec 31, 2012, 09:36 PM
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I am a new player,i have bought a geebee from this http://www.f-hobby.com/index.php?gOo...5&productname=,and after first flying ,the landinggear is broken ,can i change a new one?and how did i do?
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Old Jan 01, 2013, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by lovecat063 View Post
I am a new player,i have bought a geebee from this http://www.f-hobby.com/index.php?gOo...5&productname=,and after first flying ,the landinggear is broken ,can i change a new one?and how did i do?
You really must have smacked it good.

Seriously, Nitroplanes has the replacement parts. I mentioned that the landing gear is about $12, which is a great price and which includes the tailwheel. Here's the link:

http://www.nitroplanes.com/60p-gby-07.html
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Old Jan 04, 2013, 09:01 PM View Post
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