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Old Sep 21, 2012, 03:31 AM
MICROACES's Avatar
Joined Sep 2012
382 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by D Johnson View Post
Supermarine Spitfire. Your own battle of Britain
Hi D Johnson, If you read the first few paragraphs of the comp details you'll see the Spit & the Bf109 are a given anyhow. So in a way you've already won. But, if you want to make another suggestion please go ahead and get yourself back in the competition!
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 03:34 AM
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United Kingdom
Joined Feb 2012
196 Posts
Cassutt III
"While employed as an airline pilot, Captain Tom Cassutt of Huntington, Long Island, designed and built a small single-seat racing aircraft known as the Cassutt Special #1 in 1954. Based on Steve Wittman's "Buster" design, the Cassutt Special won the 1958 National Air Racing Championships. In 1959, Cassutt completed a smaller aircraft along the same lines known as the Cassutt Special #2. Plans of both aircraft were made available to amateur constructors and as a result many Cassutt Specials were, and are still, being built.

The Cassutt was a single-place, cantilevered mid-wing Formula One sport racer. It was a simple to construct steel-tube, wood and fabric airplane stressed for aerobatics to 12 G's. This very popular racing design is inexpensive yet it offers high performance. The fuselage, engine mount, tail and ailerons are constructed of steel tubing. The wing is all-wood with the spar a simple flat piece of spruce laminations. The 18 ribs are identical and of spruce truss construction. The wing skin is thin plywood."


a great looking racer with many of them flying in and winning air races to this day. the choice of colour schemes is vast.







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Old Sep 21, 2012, 04:28 AM
Epic Win or Epic Fail!
awood12345's Avatar
Kent, England.
Joined Dec 2001
815 Posts
Supermarine Spiteful
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermarine_Spiteful

Cool rare aircraft but I have no clue if it will sell, probably not.

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Old Sep 21, 2012, 04:46 AM
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I would like to nominate the JU87 Stuka, one off the most distinct planes ever built.
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 05:25 AM
I broke it
David Hogue's Avatar
USA, NC, Clayton
Joined Feb 2001
5,777 Posts
Transavia PL-12 Airtruk... the wierd airplane from Mad Max
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 07:02 AM
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Joined Jun 2010
3 Posts
I would like have the Heinkel HE 70 its a really beautiful aircraft and you could bring it out as a Warbird or a early Airliner

I really hope you build one
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 08:07 AM
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Spotsylvania, VA
Joined Nov 2005
93 Posts
I like the Hall Springfield Bulldog

On November 19, 1931 Bob Hall resigned from the Granville Brothers Aircraft Company. He had been the chief engineer since 1929 for the sport plane manufacturer and his designs, including the Gee Bee Model Z, had achieved many successes.
Hall set out on his own to design his own aircraft and he didn’t have to wait long for his initial orders. In 1932, Russell Thaw, with the patronage of Marion Guggenheim, ordered one of the first designs from Hall, an air racer that he could use in the Bendix Transcontinental Race as well as the Cleveland Air Races. The Bulldog made its first flight on August 15, 1932 and after some initial adjustments, Thaw made his first flight later in the month.
Unfortunately Thaw was not happy with the airplane and declined to enter it in the Bendix race. Some think the air racer was too much aircraft for the young pilot, he had not flown anything with the same kind of performance up until that point. Eventually Guggenheim would consent to letting Hall race the Bulldog at the Cleveland Air Races much to the designer’s delight.
Hall qualified for the Thompson Trophy race in the Bulldog with a speed of 243 mph. But the Gee Bee flown by Jimmy Doolittle had qualified at 294 mph and ran away with the win in the race setting a closed course record at 252 mph. Hall’s old design was too much to compete with and Hall had to settle for 6th place at only 215 mph.
There was much discussion about what could be done to make the Bulldog faster, but in the end a frustrated Hall dismantled the airplane and it never flew again.
Recreating the Hall Springfield Bulldog
Our own Jim Jenkins became fascinated by the story of the Bulldog while he was building his recreation of the Gee Bee model E back in the 1980s. After a lot of research and tracking down every bit of information about the airplane he could, Jim was ready to get started building a Bulldog.
By 1990 he had started on the wing ribs and in 1992 he started on the fuselage. In 1994 Jim stopped working on the Bulldog to start the restoration of a Bellanca Cruisemaster. Unfortunately, it would be 15 years until the Bulldog received any attention again.
Today, after so many years of waiting, Jim says he is excited to finally see it finished. He envisions his recreation of the Bulldog to be what Bob Hall would have done after taking the airplane back to Bowles-Agawam Field and refining it for the races in 1933.
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 10:35 AM
Transmogrified.
DismayingObservation's Avatar
Southern California
Joined Feb 2006
2,860 Posts
How about the Polikarpov I-16? It was the first monoplane fighter with retractable gear. It was also a short, stubby thing compared to, say, the P-40, but other than a homebuilt example I read about in Model Aviation, there are no commercial models I'm aware of.

Or how about the de Havilland Mosquito if you ever decide to do a multi? I know you're looking for single-engine subjects, but what could be more British (besides a Spitfire) than a Skeeter?
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 11:46 AM
Just some guy
D Johnson's Avatar
Joined Aug 2006
662 Posts
Hawker Hurricane, ie see Battle of Britain.
Often underrated in favor of the Spitfire , the Hurricane was the main victor of the Battle of Britain. The Royal Air Force had at that time 32 Hurricane squadrons, compared with 19 Spitfire squadrons. This meant that 620 Hurricane and Spitfire fighters (with another 84 assorted fighters like the Gloster Gladiator) had to face the German air threat of 3,500 bombers and fighters. During the "Battle of Britain", along with the Spitfire , it helped to force the Luftwaffe to use the Bf 109 to protect the poor performing twin engine Bf 110 escort fighter.
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 01:22 PM
Registered User
Canada, ON, Toronto
Joined Jun 2003
11 Posts
Macchi C.205 Veltro, “Paolino IV°”

Thanks for offering this contest. I propose an Italian beauty, the MC. 205, not your every day warbird model. These images are of an outstanding static model at
http://hyperscale.com/2007/features/c20532mdt_1.htm

Gus

The Macchi C.205 (also known as MC.205, “MC” standing for “Macchi Castoldi”) Veltro (Italian: Greyhound) was an Italian World War II fighter aircraft built by the Aeronautica Macchi. Along with the Reggiane Re.2005 and Fiat G.55, the Macchi C.205 was one of the three “Serie 5″ Italian fighters built around the powerful Daimler-Benz DB 605 engine. The C.205 was a development of the earlier C.202 Folgore. With a top speed of some 400 mph and equipped with a pair of 20 mm cannon as well as 12.7 mm Breda machine guns, the Macchi C.205 Veltro was highly respected by Allied and Luftwaffe pilots alike.

Regarded as the best Italian aircraft of World War II , in action it proved to be extremely effective, destroying a large number of Allied bombers and capable of successfully clashing on equal terms with such renowned fighters as the North American P-51D Mustang, a capability which encouraged the Luftwaffe to use a number of these aircraft to equip one Gruppe.

But, although the C.205 was able to match the best Allied opponents in speed and maneuverability, it was introduced late in the conflict. Moreover, due to the poor Italian industrial capability of the time, only a small production run was delivered before the end of the war. Like the Spitfire, the Veltro was tricky (in its construction) and thus slow to build. Italy’s highest scoring ace, Adriano Visconti, achieved 11 of his 26 credited victories in the few weeks he was able to fly the Veltro, with the top scoring 205 Sergente Maggiore pilota Luigi Gorrini shooting down 14 enemy aircraft plus six damaged with the C.205.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 12:15 AM
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10x8's Avatar
Australia, NSW, Petersham
Joined Sep 2005
1,181 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by mario24 View Post
Attachment 5172512

I would like to nominate the JU87 Stuka, one off the most distinct planes ever built.
Gday Jon,

Mario is on a winner here. I vote this too.

Pete
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 12:18 AM
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Australia, NSW, Petersham
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Ju87

Forgot pic, do'h.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 12:47 AM
What tree??.......Doh!!
Smokin_Joes's Avatar
USA, WA, Seattle
Joined Aug 2007
740 Posts
A6M Zero

My suggestion would be to represent (at least) one plane from each "theater" or nation of origin..

That said, my vote would be for:


A6M ZERO


Entered into Service July, 1940
Retired 1945
Number built 10,939
Number active in the Pacific on or about 7 Dec,1941 420









Buddy of mine and I recently ordered one (each) of your kits and look forward!

~Cheers,

Neil
*all photos © of their respective owners.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 01:50 AM
Registered User
Carbondale PA
Joined Aug 2005
548 Posts
Hi Jon,

I think you should do a nice slow flying aerobatic model like the Citabria!

Joe.

When the Citabria was introduced, it was the only airplane being commercially produced in the United States which was certified for aerobatics. Citabrias were also popular as trainers—because of their conventional gear and their aerobatic capabilities—and as personal aircraft. They were also found in utility roles such as bush flying—thanks to their short take off and landing ability, agriculture, pipeline patrol, and as glider tow planes. Though variants of the design, and other better-suited designs, have largely taken over the Citabria's utility roles, Citabrias remain popular as trainers, glider tow planes, and for personal use.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 02:14 AM
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United Kingdom, England, Melton Mowbray
Joined Jan 2008
372 Posts
I'd like to vote for a Lysander.



From Wikipedia

The first Lysanders entered service in June 1938, equipping squadrons for army co-operation and were initially used for message-dropping and artillery spotting. When war broke out in Europe, the earlier Mk Is had been largely replaced by Mk IIs, the older machines heading for the Middle East. Some of these aircraft, now designated type L.1, operated with the Chindits of the British Indian Army in the Burma Campaign of the Second World War.[3]
Four regular squadrons equipped with Lysanders accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France in October 1939, and were joined by a further squadron early in 1940. Following the German invasion of France and the low countries on 10 May 1940, the Lysanders were put into action as spotters and light bombers. In spite of occasional victories against German aircraft, they made very easy targets for the Luftwaffe even when escorted by Hurricanes.[4][5] Withdrawn from France during the Dunkirk evacuation, they continued to fly supply-dropping missions to Allied forces from bases in England; on one mission to drop supplies to troops trapped at Calais, 14 of 16 Lysanders and Hawker Hectors that set out were lost. A total of 118 Lysanders were lost in or over France and Belgium in May and June 1940, of a total of 175 deployed.[5][6] With the fall of France, it was clear that the type was unsuitable for the coastal patrol and army co-operation role, being described by Air Marshal Arthur Barratt, commander-in-chief of the British Air Forces in France as "quite unsuited to the task; a faster, less vulnerable aircraft was required."[7] It was replaced in the home-based army co-operation role from 1941 by camera-equipped fighters such as the Curtiss Tomahawk and North American Mustang carrying out reconnaissance operations, while light aircraft such as the Taylorcraft Auster were used to direct artillery.[8] Some UK-based Lysanders went to work operating air-sea rescue, dropping dinghies to downed RAF aircrew in the English Channel.[9] Fourteen squadrons and flights were formed for this role in 1940 and 1941.
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