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Old Sep 18, 2012, 07:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C₄H₁₀ View Post
What if I only own and post about cars?

I've seen a number of "pilots" here who make at least a few hundred posts before they even own an RC plane... And pilots who only post a few times a year but can fly the wings off damn near anything (figuratively speaking, of course).
Yes, and what about the ones that have thousands of posts and still type the dumbest of things?
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 08:01 PM
Dude, I do fly all day long!
rcalldaylong's Avatar
San Jose, California
Joined Dec 2007
5,838 Posts
You KNOW you are an intermediate pilot when you're hiding new planes from the wife!
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 08:08 PM
Wake up, feel pulse, be happy!
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United States, AK, Fairbanks
Joined Aug 2009
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Personally, I'd like it if post counts weren't displayed at all. People who are new to the site, or to forums in general, always seem to look at the post count as an indicator of knowledge, skill, authority, or other things like that. It goes both ways: Inexperienced people who have high counts and give bad advice are often taken more seriously than age-old modelers who know EVERYTHING but haven't been using the site very long... all based on post count.

There was an RCG user, now banned, who had over 20k posts here. He projected himself as some all-knowing sage of RC and the Universe, but much of the time he really didn't know what he was talking about (among other flaws). This type of thing is surprisingly common, too; those with the most to say... often say the least.

Then there are guys who have been building planes since before dirt was invented. Gold spills through their keyboards onto this site and literally every post is full of excellent advice or information. The problem is that, with a low post count and recent join date, the less-informed often take them as some know-it-all noob and ignore, or even ridicule, their advice.

In place of post counts and join dates, I'd rather see "Thanked in xxxx posts" (a la Wattflyer) and/or "Modeling Since xxxx".
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 08:14 PM
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I thought an intermediate pilot was the one buddy boxed between the instructor and the trainee.
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 08:20 PM
Joined Nov 2011
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Well C4H10 I would like to thank you for this one! You actually understood the point that I was trying to make.
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by rcalldaylong View Post
You KNOW you are an intermediate pilot when you're hiding new planes from the wife!
Guilty as charged.........
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 10:04 PM
Joined Nov 2011
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An expert would wrap it up and give it to her as a birthday gift, then offer to fly it for her.
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 10:16 PM
Dude, I do fly all day long!
rcalldaylong's Avatar
San Jose, California
Joined Dec 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan4169 View Post
An expert would wrap it up and give it to her as a birthday gift, then offer to fly it for her.
lol! good one!
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Old Sep 18, 2012, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C₄H₁₀ View Post
What if I only own and post about cars?
You're an intermediate R/C car driver.

Quote:
I've seen a number of "pilots" here who make at least a few hundred posts before they even own an RC plane... And pilots who only post a few times a year but can fly the wings off damn near anything (figuratively speaking, of course).
Internet forums cannot replace real life experiences. Perhaps it is best coined as, "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach text"???? Unfortunately there are a lot of armchair generals in life.

I'd rather do one thing well, even if simple flying or building than dabble in all and be master of none. Call me an intermediate beginner
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Old Sep 19, 2012, 12:09 AM
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Intermediate pilot is one who is in between a "beginner" and an "expert".

Disclaimer: Try this at your own risk. Use discretion and good judgement.

This is JMHO, to quantify when one becomes an "intermediate" pilot, I'd say after he logs in 3 consecutive 10 minute flights where he can fly a high wing 4 channel trainer well enough to do at least 10 smooth and straight touch and go's (on the runway) per flight, from the time he takes off until the last landing. That is an average of one touch and go per minute.

I mean controlled landings here, not controlled crashes, touching down on the runway (or imaginary runway) within twenty feet of the pilot. Touch and go's that are 100 feet away do not count.

This ability to do touch and go's will show that the pilot is in control (our sport is called radio control or remote control flying).

IMO, the ability to take-off and land safely is what separates the beginner from the intermediate flyer.

Once a flyer is able to confidently and consistently do the above, learning aerobatics and generally looking good in the air and feeling warm and fuzzy all over, will come naturally and easily.

IMO, regardless of what maneuvers one can perform in the air, if he cannot consistently and smoothly touch down within 20 feet of where he is standing, he is still a beginner.

Expert is when......one can touch and go within 5 feet of the pilot.:-)
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Old Sep 19, 2012, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcalldaylong View Post
You KNOW you are an intermediate pilot when you're hiding new planes from the wife!
And you're a beginner if your wife discovers them?
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Old Sep 19, 2012, 01:50 AM
Wake up, feel pulse, be happy!
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United States, AK, Fairbanks
Joined Aug 2009
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Quote:
This is JMHO, to quantify when one becomes an "intermediate" pilot, I'd say after he logs in 3 consecutive 10 minute flights where he can fly a high wing 4 channel trainer well enough to do at least 10 smooth and straight touch and go's (on the runway) per flight, from the time he takes off until the last landing. That is an average of one touch and go per minute.

I mean controlled landings here, not controlled crashes, touching down on the runway (or imaginary runway) within twenty feet of the pilot. Touch and go's that are 100 feet away do not count.
So if the pilot accidentally miscalculates on the the last TG of the third flight of the set and has to abort it, or just touches down a little too hard and bounces, he's not qualified to be an "intermediate pilot" until he does it all over again without that little one little mistake?

This sort of standardized-testing approach sounds great on paper, but I think that if we took everyone here out to a field and had them do the test in real life, we'd find that VERY few of us are actually "intermediate pilots" by your definition
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Old Sep 19, 2012, 02:01 AM
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I certainly don't see any problem with beginners testing their skills by trying to do touch and gos just a short distance from themselves. Unless you consider the safety risk of course. How about if they were to perform good touch and gos on an appropriate landing area, while they remain at a pilot station?

Edit: I just measured off an area that would represent 20 feet away in all directions. I maintain that newbies shouldn't be testing it just to prove that they are more qualified than they really are. However, it is a much more generous area than I thought. I would agree that "intermediate" pilots should be able to do that. I'm not sure whether or not a proper pattern can be flown in 1 minute though?
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Old Sep 19, 2012, 04:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C₄H₁₀ View Post
So if the pilot accidentally miscalculates on the the last TG of the third flight of the set and has to abort it, or just touches down a little too hard and bounces, he's not qualified to be an "intermediate pilot" until he does it all over again without that little one little mistake?

This sort of standardized-testing approach sounds great on paper, but I think that if we took everyone here out to a field and had them do the test in real life, we'd find that VERY few of us are actually "intermediate pilots" by your definition
Everyone is free to set out his own standard. We all fly RC for our self-satisfaction. If we are happy with a 3 bounce landing that's fine. If somebody is not satisfied until every landing is a smooth grease-in, that's fine too. Having a standard, low or high, is better than having no standard at all.

What is more important is that the beginner has a goal, which is to learn how to better control his plane with every flight. Planning each flight, with the goal of learning a new skill or maneuver or improving an old one, can only benefit the beginner or expert for that matter.

It is likely that few of us ever really put much thought into improving our RC flying skills in such a structured manner.

Beginners learning to fly full scale aircraft have to take off and land on the runway. I cannot imagine a full scale flying student missing the runway and still getting his wings right after landing on the grass instead of the runway:-) Why can't RC pilots do the same?

We all engage in this hobby for many reasons and we all have different goals as far as reaching certain levels of skill.

It may seem that my TG standard to be classified "intermediate" is a little high, but that's just my own standard. It is not set in stone. I do promise however, that it is 101% doable if one sets his mind to attaining it. How good a pilot do we want to be? Like many other skillsets, RC flying is easier if one has the some aptitude and more importantly, the right attitude.

This standardized approach/criteria will definitely work in practice. In fact, it has been proved to work.

If anybody has never done it, I highly recommend them to try it. TG practice may sound tedious but if you can TG like it was second nature, your skill in other flying areas, like precision aerobatics, will improve much faster.
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Old Sep 19, 2012, 04:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan4169 View Post
I certainly don't see any problem with beginners testing their skills by trying to do touch and gos just a short distance from themselves. Unless you consider the safety risk of course. How about if they were to perform good touch and gos on an appropriate landing area, while they remain at a pilot station?

Edit: I just measured off an area that would represent 20 feet away in all directions. I maintain that newbies shouldn't be testing it just to prove that they are more qualified than they really are. However, it is a much more generous area than I thought. I would agree that "intermediate" pilots should be able to do that. I'm not sure whether or not a proper pattern can be flown in 1 minute though?
Disclaimer: Try this at your own risk. Use discretion and good judgement.

The target area for "touch and go" is 20 ft to the left and 20 ft to the right, and 20 ft to the front of the pilot. Imagine a 40 ft long and 20 ft wide rectangle painted on the runway or grass strip. One might even go so far as to spray paint lines on the grass or asphalt runway.

Sure he can remain at a pilot station and do his TGs at a certain distance, if say club rules dictate such procedures, or he is not acquired sufficient skill and confidence. The idea of having a definite landing target is so that the pilot can improve and demonstrate his control over the plane...not vice-versa. The farther the target area is from the pilot, the more difficult it is to hit.

40 x 20 ft is a good sized target. It will require some skill to touch down within this rectangle. The beginner must have the goal of landing consistently inside this rectangle at the rate of 10 times in a 10 minute flight, like passing an exam. Landings do not have to be perfect 3 - pointers. But I can assure you that a pilot can only improve his TG skills the more he TGs.

A beginner should be able to take off and land within one minute. One minute is a long time. That is, if he can fly a small-enough pattern in adequate control of the model. Advanced pilots should be able to do it within about 30 seconds.

I agree that beginners should know their limitations and not expose other fliers or spectators to possible injury.
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