HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale
Reply
Thread Tools
Old Sep 16, 2012, 10:19 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Build Log
Rob Caso's Bulldog

Hey guys....at the risk of boring everyone to tears with a model that has been "out there" for awhile, I am posting my build pics and notes since a number of guys picked up kits at NEAT and I know there are a number of unbuilt models colleting dust (you know who you are!)

OK, let's face it. The only reasons that the model sits unbuilt are as follows:

Too hard/complicated to build
Takes too much time to build
Too hard to fly
Lost interest

I can't do anything about the last one, but the others are just untrue. While I include the plans with the kit, I tell people that you really don't need them. Everything interlocks and the fuse is built on a removable frame that holds everything in situ during construction. The time consuming aspects are the gull and finishing. If you work hard, basic framing can be done in a weekend. At the end if you simply want to put a film covering on it, it can be done but the gull would be the tough area.

Hard to fly? I flew mine about 6 times at NEAT and the model flies like it's on rails. It's really amazing, it doesn't do anything stupid and it doesn't stall on landing. It flies like a warbird of about the same size. I have had trouble landing it as I have always previously come in too fast, causing a nose over. Now I land it wheels down by getting it slow enough - it just does not stall because of the wing's 3 deg washout and if you slow it down, it won't trip on grass. Mine is 18oz but would be fine at probably no more than 22.

My building notes are floating around on RCG but I will include them here and paraphrase them for the photos, noting anything not in the instructions.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old Sep 16, 2012, 10:38 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction

The fuse is built on a 4-post, 1/8 balsawood frame that should look like the nose of a missle when you assemble it - it is included in the short kit. The large gussets keep it square.

Most of the bulkheads are 1/8 LtPly but at 6, 7 and 9 are laminated 1/16 balsa noted as "2X" on the plans. #8 was changed to 1/16 ply since it kept breaking. Glue the pairs together keeping the engraved part numbers facing you. Since I'm so sneaky, each half of 6 does a different job and that and the others are cut crossgrain to form a ply when laminated together.

Slide them all on the building frame, keeping the numbers of the bulkheads so you can read them when looking from the nose of the model. This is important, if you screw this up and start sheeting/stringering, you will need a whole new set of bulkheads. Double check your work here!!
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Last edited by casor; Sep 17, 2012 at 08:44 AM. Reason: In the first line I meant "If the BULKHEADS are a little loose"....
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 10:51 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction - cont'd

If the stringers are a little loose, OK and this actually helps you install the slotted laser cut longerons - there are (8) of these and they must be lam'd together in pairs to yield (4) parts. If you want to use wood glue and wait so that you can get a good alignment for the lamination, be my guest. Don't use alot.

The longeron with more slots - this is for the turtledeck - goes at the 12 o'clock pos on the fuse. The other (3) are identical and go at 3, 6, 9 o'clock pos. It's fiddley to get them all on but, hey, I did it! Install w/o glue at first and seat them all properly so that they rest flush with the rings. A little loose is OK, don't worry about it.

Make absolutely sure that your bulkheads are oriented correctly and then glue them in to ea bulkhead with a single drop of GF CyA on ea side of the joint. No thin CyA!!!
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 10:56 PM
D.G.B.
KOMET 44's Avatar
Southington, Connecticut, United States
Joined Jun 2000
2,951 Posts
I seen the plane fly at the neat fest.Everything he says about the plane is correct.I was waiting in line to fly while watching his bulldog do it's thing.Impressive.
stefanP
KOMET 44 is offline Find More Posts by KOMET 44
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 11:11 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction - cont'd

With the rings on the frame and the slotted longerons installed, onto sheeting and stringering. Sand the framework with 220 on a block to make sure that all the joints are level. Don't trust yourself? Apply a "guide coat" of Duplicolor gray primer - spritz the framework from 385 feet away and get some gray on all the edges. Not heavy, just enough to get some "dots" on the edges. Then sand with the block noting that when the gray disappears from ea joint, the joint will be level.

There are (2) dims of stringers - 1/8x1/4 and 1/16x3/16. The latter is for the open - covered - area on the Bulldog and the former, wider stringers, are for attaching the sheeting.

Install the million 1/16x3/16 stringers in the aft section of the fuse, but do not sand them - they will stand proud of the sheeting when it is applied. Stick them on and leave them for now. Use fairly heavy stock so that if you later pick the finished model up by the fuse, you won't crunch all the stringers under the covering.

Start sheeting the fuse using the nicest, soft-med 1/16 you can find. It should bend easily in your hand, be even grained throughout and have no knots or anything funny. If it does, tell it to be serious, you're building a Bulldog.

Sheeting over a compound curve as we have here, if you haven't done it before, can be a little scary. See my post for my Camel on how to do it - it's really not that bad as I gave you a lot of stringers to glue to. Do it in small sections, not one giant sheet.

To wit:
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...1609144&page=3
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 11:21 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction - cont'd

The fuse frame can be removed once most of the sheeting is applied, or you can leave it in for the duration. I left mine in. Another tip on sheeting is to leave a small gap between the pcs, you can fill them later. But do try to avoid getting glue on the surface as the sandpaper won't cut it - it will just get pushed down and pop up after the sandpaper goes by. Then, it's worse as all around the glue spot is now sanded lower, making the glue spot stand out even more. It's maddening. Cut it out and fill it if you have to. Don't be nice.

Here's my article on finishing small models which is relevant here.....

Give the model a light sanding with the 220 block and nick down all the high spots and then fill the gaps. Once the sheeting is all on, you can sand down those million stringers at the open section. Note that to sheet aft of the open section, you will have to sand the stringers down to the level of the bulkhead to give you something to glue the sheeting to.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 11:35 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction - cont'd

If you are all sheeted, you should try to get the fuse to be as good as you can now - no cracks, fill the grain, lightly prime the model. I like to use nitrate dope on the balsa to toughen it up first and vinyl spackle for filler. The nitrate also water proofs the balsa which will be important for applying the glass cloth.

Glue on and round in the nose pcs which is a lam of semi circular 3/16 balsa pcs. This section will be just behind the cowl and gives the model that "here's the plane and here's the cowl" look and also gives you a gap at the back of cowl for cooling your 550 HP, 9 cylinder, air-cooled, OHV, radial engine you borrowed from your neighbor. It will also work for a brushless motor.

I glass all the skinning on my small models with .75oz glass cloth applied with Minwax Polycrylic flat water based varnish. See the article above. It is easy to do and goes on like butter. Do in sections and avoid getting any over the open stringered area.

This step is where the water proofing comes in. If you don't have nitrate, use a regular solvent based flat varnish. While 1/16 balsa can take the water in the Polycrylic, NEVER EVER put this stuff on a 1/32 sheeted surface. It will wrinkle up and never flatten back out. Water proof it first.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 11:41 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction - cont'd

Here's where all the work is. If you are painting, it will take quite some time to finish the fuse to get it ready for a gloss finish. Sand, prime, sand prime, blah blah blah. See my article again.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 11:47 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Fuselage construction - cont'd

I am a little out of sequence on the photos, but you get the idea. I just got back from NEAT and I am tired.

Seriously, if you are not playing with your dogs too much, you can do the fuse is 6-8 hrs.

After the fuse is reasonably ready for paint, sand all the primer off again and redo it. Then sand with 400 and 600 on a sponge. No kidding.

My rescued pug/boxer, Max, is a constant distraction
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2012, 11:58 PM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
The gull

OK this is a real pain in the neck. It is. First thing to do is to find the slots for the gull spars that are on the bulkheads underneath your nicely finished, ready for paint fuselage. Use a pin from the inside and then slice them out. There are pcs in the kit that should be installed now to box out the slots on the bulkhead. Luckily, the fuselage is so big, you can almost stand in it.

Glue the LtPly spars in but make sure they are 90 deg to the fuse. This is why I made them initially as part of the bulkheads, but it was too hard to sheet and finish around them. Once they are in install the ribs and LE, and sheet the bottom with 1/32. I also cut holes in the fuse for the aileron leads and left the gull sheeting open on the bottom so I could fish them through. Taper the LE to accomodate the miserable upper sheeting.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2012, 12:07 AM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
The gull

The gull ribs will help you align the spars BTW so don't stress too much. Once the gull is sheeted and the leads are in, finish it as you did the fuselage but don't forget that you have to line the end of it up with the wing which will probably be skinnier since you probably didn't take enough off the top of the gull.

There is a fin support aft of the turtledeck that must be installed and blended with the fuse. The pics show all and also all the pcs that I used on the gull.

Once the gull is finished, primp over the entire fuselage with filler, primer and sandpaper.

One aside, the LG tubes should be a larger dia so that .074 wire can be used for the LG - dont use 1/16 as it is too flexy....
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2012, 12:12 AM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Elev and rudder

With the fuse ready, build/glass/cover the fin/stab, rudder/elev and finish it but don't install. It is easier to paint these separately. Install the hinges in the fin/stab. Run in the micro pushrods and glue in supports along the way. See the fuse photo above early in the post.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2012, 12:43 AM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Elev and rudder

One more note, only the elev/rudd pushrod tubes are installed now and the rudder has an internal linkage that is described in the inst. At final assy, the pushrods are installed on the horns, and these are slid in their tubes when the elev/rudd are installed on the model.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2012, 09:00 AM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
Elev and rudder ...and LG!

You probably figured this out by now, but the fuselage frame must be removed now for good to put in the rudd/elev pushrod tubes/supports and LG tubes. If you want to use brass for the LG tubes and take a small weight hit, fine. Finish the stab rudder as you did the fuse and apply covering to the moveable surfaces.

Landing gear. Since I was manical about weight on the prototype and really had no idea if it was going to fly, I under built the LG mounts and used too thin of wire for the LG itself. It was all a guess. Since we now know it's a good airplane ("well behaved" to quote Thayer), use .074 wire for the LG and glass in the LG mounts from the inside with 2oz cloth and 30 min epoxy. Your LG tubes must be larger in dia to do this as nobody makes tube with .074 dia. Use a larger tube and fill it with epoxy/glass fiber at the end when installing the plug in LG legs. If you want to use .074 wire for just the front leg, this may be a good compromise.

To make the fuse easier to finish, I used a plug in design for the LG.
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2012, 09:16 AM
Failure is not an option
casor's Avatar
Boyertown, Pa
Joined Mar 2007
825 Posts
More LG

Don't forget to make sure that the LG is set up a bit pigeon toed. I actually made balsa/ply wheels for the prototype - which are still on the model!!. A decent, skinny plastic wheel is fine.

I secure all my wheels using a tube axle (soldered over a cut down LG leg wire axle) , a hole in the end of this, a soldered washer inboard and a free washer outboard secured by a pc of copper wire. More work but they don't come off. I hate collars/set screws. Cut the wire axle so that the tube will be about 1/8" longer than the axle and so that the tube can be drilled at its end. Consider also CyA'ing a corresponding tube in the wheel. Little fiddley on the Bulldog as the wheel fairings are so thin, so assemble these first. Wheels should be lubed if you do this as brass will corrode.

Did this on my Storch.....and everything else
casor is offline Find More Posts by casor
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gallery Rob Caso's 37" Mosquito casor Electric Warbirds 11 Jul 03, 2014 01:50 PM
Discussion How's this for gun control? 71 year old shoots gunmen trying to rob cafe srt8madness Life, The Universe, and Politics 12 Jul 18, 2012 10:16 PM
Discussion Rob Caso Dauntless Build Blue Jacket Electric Warbirds 3 Feb 17, 2010 06:42 PM