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Old Sep 07, 2012, 09:48 PM
Crash test dummy....
mattthomas78's Avatar
United States, TN, Waynesboro
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Question
Frequencies

I'm having trouble finding out which video/radio frequencies in my area are illegal..... Can someone send a link my way that I can look at local/nationwide FCC legal frequencies? I travel for work and would like to take a small FPV setup with me and I don't want to break any local laws....

Thanks!!

Matt
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Old Sep 07, 2012, 10:55 PM
Engineer for Christ
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Amherst, VA
Joined Jun 2006
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FCC is federal. If traveling within the States you are cleared so long as you have a HAM radio license. If you buy from a U.S. vendor, your system will only operate on legal bands as they are not allowed to sell you stuff that operates on illegal bands.

You can also have a look at the frequency allocation chart: http://www.ntia.doc.gov/files/ntia/p...3-allochrt.pdf
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Old Sep 07, 2012, 10:57 PM
Crash test dummy....
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Awesome!! Thanks Alex!!
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Old Sep 07, 2012, 11:01 PM
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I have asked this question before and was not able to get a clear answer. Basically I would like to see a list that said;

900-1200mhz
With Ham License up to 1 watt
Without Ham License, up to 10mw

5.8-5.8Ghz
With Ham License up to 1 watt
Without Ham License, up to 10mw

1500mhz
Illegal at any power level

(I just made the above info up to illustrate) No one has been able to interpret the multitude of available information about legal/illegal frequencies and put it in a simple format such as this.

Oh, and the list would require links to posted official documentation to support the info in the list. Previously there was a lot of "I know this is correct but I can't provide a link to teh official documentation that states it is"
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 03:14 AM
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Ham license is required for all of the above I believe.

The only way to fly without a ham licence is an FCC certified transmitter. We made one for Hobby Lobby in 2008 (I have one on my shelf here) but it has been discontinued. As far as I know there aren't any FCC approved, licence free, FPV transmitters available now.

All the best

Simon
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 04:21 AM
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Correct. If it doesn't have an FCC sticker on it (regardless of freq and powera), you need
to be a HAM to use it legally.
The max power levels available to hams are waaay beyond anything we need for fpv
so they're mostly irrelevant.

The actual frequency bands available for RC and ATV are posted fairly often.

ian
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 08:52 AM
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Ok, lets say it should be; (removing all numbers because I am not trying to start a discussion on these made-up frequencies/power levels)

__________________________________________________ __________
XXX-XXXXmhz
FCC approved device (has FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw
Non-FCC approved device (does not have FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw

X.X-X.X Ghz
FCC approved device (has FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw
Non-FCC approved device (does not have FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw

XXXX mhz
Illegal at any power level

__________________________________________________ ____________

Again, I know various information has been posted many times however it seems most of it is supposed to stand on someone saying " I know this is correct because of XXXXX" but no supporting link or official documentation is provided. I am not saying their information is right or wrong but accepting it solely on face value is irresponsible.

Again, a list such as above WITH supporting documentation would be INVALUABLE, would be a sticky and would stop a lot of conflicting information on RCG.

I wish I had the resources and knowledge to compile such as list and would have thought that with the vast knowledge contained by members on RCG that this would be a simple no-brainer. The fact that it has not been done leads me to believe that it isn't as simple as it seems. Is this because the info is obscured or incomprehensible as provided by the FCC? I don't know.
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 09:07 AM
Crash test dummy....
mattthomas78's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by techspy View Post
Ok, lets say it should be; (removing all numbers because I am not trying to start a discussion on these made-up frequencies/power levels)

__________________________________________________ __________
XXX-XXXXmhz
FCC approved device (has FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw
Non-FCC approved device (does not have FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw

X.X-X.X Ghz
FCC approved device (has FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw
Non-FCC approved device (does not have FCC sticker on the device)
With Ham License up to X watt
Without Ham License, up to X mw

XXXX mhz
Illegal at any power level

__________________________________________________ ____________

Again, I know various information has been posted many times however it seems most of it is supposed to stand on someone saying " I know this is correct because of XXXXX" but no supporting link or official documentation is provided. I am not saying their information is right or wrong but accepting it solely on face value is irresponsible.

Again, a list such as above WITH supporting documentation would be INVALUABLE, would be a sticky and would stop a lot of conflicting information on RCG.

I wish I had the resources and knowledge to compile such as list and would have thought that with the vast knowledge contained by members on RCG that this would be a simple no-brainer. The fact that it has not been done leads me to believe that it isn't as simple as it seems. Is this because the info is obscured or incomprehensible as provided by the FCC? I don't know.
What he said....
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 10:47 AM
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http://www.mobiletrax.com/Portals/mo...o_Spectrum.jpg

Anything in green that says "amatuer" is open for FPV use. Keep in mine our transmitters will bleed lower and higher. So you can't transmit on 1240, because we use bandwidth down to 1237, etc.etc.etc.

Anything that isn't FCC/CE certified cannot be used without a tech license. Your xbox controller is wireless and license free because it's digital and doesn't interfere outside it's frequency. You FPV transmitter is not, thus it needs a license to operate.
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 11:04 AM
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Yep, seen that diagram before (it was already linked to in the 2nd post) but it still doesn't address output power limitations. So anything in green can be used but requires a tech license regardless of whether or not it is "FCC Approved" or the power output? If so, can you provide a link to official documentation that states this?

So according to your statement, a long range system on 433mhz can legally be used for RC control systems but requires a tech license. What are the power restrictions? Where is the supporting documents?

And you point out another caveat... The bleed over frequencies. So, if there were a list it would also need to have the cutoff frequencies specified to take into account this bleed over. Yet another issue that makes the case for a simple list.

Please don't regard my frustration as being directed at you. I am just frustrated that there isn't a simple half page list of the frequencies that we use for FPV that lays out the requirements with supporting documentation.
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 11:14 AM
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This is the government we are talking about, why would it be simple?
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 11:19 AM
Team White Llama!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by techspy View Post
So anything in green can be used but requires a tech license regardless of whether or not it is "FCC Approved" or the power output? If so, can you provide a link to official documentation that states this?
No. Anything in green can be used aslong as you have a tech. I don't remember the power limits but just ask when your getting your license. Ham's can use over 50 watts, pretty regularly. So our little 500mw TX's are not where near the limit.

FCC approved wireless devices can be used by anyone. If you want proof, look at anything you have that is wireless. your regular RC transmitter, your xbox controller, your baby monitor. All have FCC or CE certifications.

Quote:
So according to your statement, a long range system on 433mhz can legally be used for RC control systems but requires a tech license. What are the power restrictions? Where is the supporting documents?
The support document is the one I linked you to.The power restrictions are high. Like +50watts high. If you want the actual number, ask when getting your tech license.

However, like everyone is saying, it's so high that it doesn't effect us at all.

Quote:
And you point out another caveat... The bleed over frequencies. So, if there were a list it would also need to have the cutoff frequencies specified to take into account this bleed over. Yet another issue that makes the case for a simple list.
The simple list is there. Just keep in mind to add 3mhz or bleed over. It's simple.
Quote:

Please don't regard my frustration as being directed at you. I am just frustrated that there isn't a simple half page list of the frequencies that we use for FPV that lays out the requirements with supporting documentation.

Government=complicated.
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 11:19 AM
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I hear ya brother. I deal with it every day...

Couple other thoughts...

I have read where people have said that certain output (10mw?) on certain freqs didn't require a license (no supporting documentation provided) and I remember those crappy X10 video transmitter that were not digital. I know they didn't work well, but they were selling them without a license disclaimer. I assumed it was because their output was so low. Maybe they were just low power FM. That leads me to believe that there is some frequencies at some power levels that do not require a license.

Anyway, probably not gonna happen but it would be nice to have such a document.
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 11:26 AM
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Here, easy.

Freq_______________power
910mhz, anything on the market
1258mhz, anything on the market
1280mhz, anything on the market
2305MHz, anything on the market
2396MHz, anything on the market
2414Mhz, anything on the market
2432mhz, anything on the market
2450MHz, anything on the market
5740mhz, anything on the market
5760mhz, anything on the market
5780mhz, anything on the market
5800mhz, anything on the market
5820mhz, anything on the market
5840mhz, anything on the market
5860mhz, anything on the market
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Old Sep 08, 2012, 11:40 AM
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Those crappy X10 video transmitters had an FCC sticker.
*None* of the FPV gear we use has them.
The power limit for unlicenced (with fcc sticker) analog video is closer to 1mW than 10
but it's confusing because the FCC doesn't specify power limits in mW but field strength in units of microvolts/meter.
Link an earlier post with some links to supporting documentation.
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...0#post16687213

ian
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