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Old Sep 30, 2012, 03:31 PM
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Bedordshire,UK
Joined May 2004
9 Posts
I've noticed that none of you guys have mentioned the Multiplex radios. I know in the USA they are difficult to buy but for imho the Multiplex 3000/4000 series of are the finest sailplane radios ever made. I've had my 3010 since 1995 and there has not been a model I can't program it for. I recently took up power flying and bought a Futaba FF8uaps with an FrSky 2-way telemetry system. Great for power flying but I decided to try it out on one of my gliders (2 wing servos, spoiler servo, rudder and elevator) and wanted to arrange the spolier on the throttle with a switch to switch it out for safety. Talk about frustating!!! on the MPX it is easily achieved on a 6ch receiver. On the Futaba so inflexible!!! Try programming a 2 wing servo model (4ch) with spoilerons on a 4-ch receiver using futaba - you can't do it!

So I will convert my MPS 3010 to 2.4 using the FrSky DHT-U which gives telemetry as well

- Mike
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 03:42 PM
Jeff
USA, CA, Redondo Beach
Joined Aug 2003
645 Posts
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Originally Posted by MikeyC View Post
I've noticed that none of you guys have mentioned the Multiplex radios. I know in the USA they are difficult to buy but for imho the Multiplex 3000/4000 series of are the finest sailplane radios ever made.

- Mike
That's essentially it. They were not distributed or advertised much. But I have always seen many pictures in Quiet and Electric Flight International of glider pilots in Europe using the 3000/4000. Is that the same line as the Cockpit and Profi?

I just don't see a lot of tray radios here. I hear very little about the DX-10 in the sailplane forums here. It is pricey at $1000. Trays do seem like a very natural way to fly an R/C craft of and type.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 03:44 PM
Jeff
USA, CA, Redondo Beach
Joined Aug 2003
645 Posts
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Originally Posted by aeajr View Post
Buddy you have the best of all worlds. Enjoy them!
Yeah. I expected (hoped?) to get outbid. But I am not gonna complain about a 9303 DSM2 for $200.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 03:53 PM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
LI, New York, USA
Joined Mar 2003
24,245 Posts
You can also fly the Hobbico AnyLink planes using their Anylink module. A JR cable is included. So you have access to their BnF planes too.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 07:14 PM
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St. Louis, MO
Joined Oct 2002
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A new radio to look into is the Graupner lineup. i just got a MX-16 8 channel to see what it can do and put it in my Tragi. It is missing a few features of the SD-10 but fir many people I'm not sure it is an issue. Things like curve point mixing. Mixing is done linear but for example flap to elevator mixing worked fine in linear fashion. It can handle a full house plane and then some. The MX-20 12 channel will have more flight modes and more model memories but the MX-16 works fine and may be a great radio for the person who wants to spend time flying and not fiddleing with 7 point curves and such. The big plus is built in telemetry. You can monitor all receiver functions and things like vario, GPS, RPM and battery temperature with add on sensors. Yes, I'm a dealer but these radios should not be over looked.

Mark Miller
www.isthmusmodels.com
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 07:42 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
LI, New York, USA
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Thanks Mark.

My multiplex knowledge stopped at the Royal EVO line and then I was just someone who read about them. They had a very unique way of doing the programming. As I understand it, out of the box, nothing did anything till you programmed it. Even the 4 basic functions did not work.

Word was there was a steep learning curve but once you "got it" the radios could do anything you could imagine.

Are they still like that or did they go to a more standard programming/menu type set-up.
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 08:42 AM
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Tennessee
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What do you mean by "standare programming" I never understood the asian programming of unconnected menus. I had trouble remembering which menu contained the action I wanted and which buttons were pushed in what order to get there. It was much more logical to push the stick button to set control throws, mixer buttons to set mixes, servo button to set control throws, folder button to select models, etc. I received the first Evo sold in the US and spent a week unlearning everything I learned from Airtronics, Futaba, and Hitec. I started by programming an old RES sailplane and slowly expanded to my full house sailplanes working up to Mark Drela's very complex Subra program. I eventually settled on a much simpler program that reduces the chances of flying with a switch in the wrong position. When I was flying Futaba and Hitec radios, I always carried the manuel in my tool box in case I needed to make a change at the field. Now I don't even remember which bookshelf has my Evo manual and won't need it again unless I need to write a new mixer.
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 09:39 AM
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LI, New York, USA
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Originally Posted by ChuckA View Post
What do you mean by "standare programming" I never understood the asian programming of unconnected menus. I had trouble remembering which menu contained the action I wanted and which buttons were pushed in what order to get there. It was much more logical to push the stick button to set control throws, mixer buttons to set mixes, servo button to set control throws, folder button to select models, etc. I received the first Evo sold in the US and spent a week unlearning everything I learned from Airtronics, Futaba, and Hitec. I started by programming an old RES sailplane and slowly expanded to my full house sailplanes working up to Mark Drela's very complex Subra program. I eventually settled on a much simpler program that reduces the chances of flying with a switch in the wrong position. When I was flying Futaba and Hitec radios, I always carried the manuel in my tool box in case I needed to make a change at the field. Now I don't even remember which bookshelf has my Evo manual and won't need it again unless I need to write a new mixer.
Great report. But the "unconnected menus" of the past are long gone in the higher end radios. You will still see them in some of the low end radios, like the Hitec Optic 6 Sport or the older Eclipse 7 or older Futaba and other brands. But the newer radios are mostly menu driven and quite connected. But that is not the point of my question.

The question is, do the new Multiplex radios follow the same programming style as the EVOs or are they more like the A JR 9303, 9503 or a Futaba 9C, 10C, 8FG or an Airtronics SD10G or an Aurora 9. These are the radios in this class that dominate the North American market.
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Old Oct 03, 2012, 12:42 PM
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Canada, BC, Victoria
Joined Mar 2004
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I do know that you shouldn't go with a DX6i. How? I've got one!

I have a 3 channel DLG. Aileron, rudder, elevator. I would like the radio to do the following:
- Put flaps on throttle. (Yes, use one mix.)
- Three flight modes (Speed, normal, thermal.) I can get two flight modes using the last mix.)
- Mix elevator with flaps. (Can't - need more mixing)
- Launch mode (Can't - need more mixing.)

On the good side it is light, inexpensive and uses just 4 AAs.

Colin
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Old Oct 03, 2012, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ColinB View Post
I do know that you shouldn't go with a DX6i. How? I've got one!

I have a 3 channel DLG. Aileron, rudder, elevator. I would like the radio to do the following:
- Put flaps on throttle. (Yes, use one mix.)
- Three flight modes (Speed, normal, thermal.) I can get two flight modes using the last mix.)
- Mix elevator with flaps. (Can't - need more mixing)
- Launch mode (Can't - need more mixing.)

On the good side it is light, inexpensive and uses just 4 AAs.

Colin
Thanks Colin. I don't think too many people would think of the DX6i as a sailplane radio, but you really illustrated why.
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Old Oct 05, 2012, 10:45 AM
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Bellevue WA,
Joined Dec 2003
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The new JR XG series of radios have promice but they need field testing by the masses before I could recommend them.
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Old Oct 05, 2012, 01:39 PM
Jeff
USA, CA, Redondo Beach
Joined Aug 2003
645 Posts
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Originally Posted by aeajr View Post
Thanks Colin. I don't think too many people would think of the DX6i as a sailplane radio, but you really illustrated why.
Yes. Thanks. For certain I was only looking at the DX6i for BnF helis like the Blade 400 etc whilst keeping the SD-10g per advice here.

Of course for my RES woodies almost anything would work.
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Old Oct 05, 2012, 04:59 PM
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St. Louis, MO
Joined Oct 2002
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Ed,

As far as I know the Evo programming is still the same. Having things not work is really not all that weird. Same goes for the SD-10G. You need to assign a control(stick or switch) to a function and then a function to a channel. Unlike a lot of radios you are not bound by their channel/function scheme. It is kind of difficult for a guy who comes from a standardized channel/function scheme but it sure makes things nice to understand. If I have a RES plane I can in my own mind use my standard Rudder, Elevator, spoiler on channels 1,2 and 3. Not 3,4 and 6 or some such weirdness. One other thing I like with the Multiplex and SD-10 is that you can name the channels by function not by channel number. I always hate having to go back to the manual to figure out what goes where.
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Old Oct 07, 2012, 12:41 AM
Jeff
USA, CA, Redondo Beach
Joined Aug 2003
645 Posts
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Originally Posted by gdjsky01 View Post
Yeah. I expected (hoped?) to get outbid. But I am not gonna complain about a 9303 DSM2 for $200.
Wow.. The 9303 showed up today. Really pleased for $200. Thinner than the SD-10G, which for me, with small hands, might actually make it a better heli radio when using 'pinch' and needing to keep a finger on throttle hold. It really hard to use pinch and have the reach to a no-brainer throttle hold switch for people with small hands using 'thicker' radios. That said, I've heard others (Crash Handcock) with large hands complain about spacings being too small.

For $200 it was a steal. The SD-10G is still an amazing value new tho it seams it's price has risen. I think I paid $325 with a 7 channel FHSS-1 RX two years ago.
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Old Oct 07, 2012, 04:52 AM
Skye Malcolm
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Upper Arlington, OH
Joined Mar 2009
631 Posts
I have flown full house sailplanes for 6 years, first 3 with a Stylus, last 3 years with an SD-10G. I have nothing but praise for the SD-10G in terms of ease/flexibility of programming, rock solid RF link, weight of the transmitter, and battery life. (I use 2500 mAh NiMH non-eneloop cells and put in a direct path from the charge port to the battery so I could charge with my Sirius Smart Charger). I'm pretty sure I could fly an 8 hour slope task with this setup, but for sure could do it charging up the radio as I fly since I have the direct connection to do that if desired.

I have timed for a friend at the NATS flying the Hitec Aurora 9 and it does have an innovative altimeter telemetry option. Displayed on his Transmitter LCD was "RPM 1850" which he would sometimes ask me to read off the number every few seconds. This wasn't exactly his altitude in feet or meters due to calibration issue but he told me it did indicate altitude uncompensated by a pitot tube. He was circling directly over our heads which is always tough for pilot and timer to read as lift or sink and yet by me reading the numbers to him he could see he was in a thermal and was going up after all. Since it wasn't like a vario with an audio indication it wouldn't be so user friendly if you flew alone but he said it worked well if he had someone timing for him which is exactly the situation in sailplane contests. I think he said that altimeter device and the telemetry module cost less $100 to add to the radio, although that was at the 2011 NATS so prices could have changed by now.
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