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Old Sep 20, 2012, 07:46 PM
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DanL's Avatar
United States, MN, Brainerd
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The low towpoint is required in order for the towline to stay clear of the bowsprit/dolphin striker assembly when towing the model.
There is no hole through the hull. The towpoint is an eybolt screwed into the keel - shown in the drawing. A loop of line is tied through the eyebolt and stays in place. The loop serves as a clip off point for a clip on the end of the towline.
The eyebolt can be just above the waterline, but I preferrred that it didn't show in sailing photos.
I tried other towpoints, but this point is the only one I tried so far that works.
Remember - you will be towing under adverse conditions: against the wind, a disabled model, a damaged model, through/out-of weeds. Many times the towed model drifts off the direction of tow due to wind, dead rudder, etc. The towline must stay clear of the model in many positions other than a stable tow position behind the towing boat.
Also, the reason for the loop is to allow fast easy clip-on of the towline. It's harder than you might think to approach the model and position oneself to allow adequate reach and time to clip on.
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Last edited by DanL; Sep 20, 2012 at 07:47 PM. Reason: add pic
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Old Sep 20, 2012, 07:56 PM
Pond Sailer's Avatar
United States, CA, Castro Valley
Joined Mar 2012
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Good hindsight. Thx Dan. What you say here makes a lot of since to me. In that I have not seen just the hull to see the thickness at that part of the hull, how long of a eye screw would I need without going into the boat.

Gary.
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 09:01 AM
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don't worry about "going into the boat". An eyescrew will seal any penetration.
The eyescrew should be slightly countersunk, screwed in and then set in with epoxy. I used JB Weld Quick epoxy for many of the adhesive points during the build.
I used about a 3/8" OD eyescrew.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 02:41 PM
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United States, IN, Indianapolis
Joined Nov 2010
257 Posts
Thanks Dan. Just the pic I wanted to see.

Glue deck first, bulwarks second? The instructions say to glue down the deck before gluing the bulwarks in place. Is this how everyone actually did it?
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 05:49 PM
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United States, CA, San Jose
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Hi Andrew

If I glued in my bulwarks, I wouldn't be able to get the deck in. It's a close fit even with the rail tops trimmed back(As per instruction). I'll be gluing the deck first, Then bulwarks.

Hope that helps
best regards
Tim
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 08:17 PM
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Tim, did you plan on having the bulwarks clamped in place while you glued the deck in? It's getting that precise fit that worries me (well among several worries over this big step).
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 07:57 AM
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It was a long time ago, but if I remember right, the deck install procedure was: insert deck, clamp bulwarks in place (using nuts/bolts/big washers through the gunports), insert short pieces of dowel under deck to temporarily prop it TIGHTLY against the bulwark bottoms, epoxy support blocks to the hull and deck to hold teh deck in place from beneath, after epoxy on the support blocks sets remove the dowels, now epoxy along the whole joint between the deck and hull (from below) to waterproof it, after that epoxy bead sets remove the bulwarks, apply epoxy and reinstall bulwarks.
Make sure to seal the joint between deck and hull from the top, too, with a bead of epoxy that will not show after bukwarks are set in place.

This is the hardest part of the build, but it goes well. Celebrate after the deck install...
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 11:20 AM
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Hi Andrew

I have marked the the decks bottom edge when I had everything installed and in the correct position and the deck pushed up against the bulwarks (did this several times to make sure it's marked in the right spot) . I'll double check the deck thickness with bulwarks clamped(just to be sure) and glue the support blocks around the inner hull at the line I have. This will allow me to clamp the supports securely while the epoxy cures. The deck will then be bonded and then the bulwarks will be bonded in place.

Before all this happens though, I have the below deck layout to think about, the exterior hull scribing and some deck detailing to do.

That's the plan anyway. ha ha

Like Dan said, I will be happy and celebrating once over this big hurdle. : )

have a great day
Tim
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 04:23 PM
Paratrooper
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Eubank Kentucky
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Tow rope

I never got around to actually doing something with Surprise. Dan's method really worked well on the water and easy to secure--I kept foundering in my limited mental capital and just tied a line to the end block of the bowsprit. No doubt Dan's method worked well.

I too was reluctant to drill below the water line because by the time I found out a better way the two decks were on permenantly. Drilling and tappng a hole down there did not appeal.

If you are going to do this--do it before the deck is on and put a washer and nut on the inside then epoxy it all around in and behind to make sure it will never leak. You would have a really good towing tie that does not show on the ship. It does not need to be very large--a 1/8 diameter eye bold with a small eye say about 1/2 inch would work very well.
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 05:17 PM
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United States, IN, Indianapolis
Joined Nov 2010
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Week 4

Thanks for all the great info everyone. Moving on...

Gun port lids. After some debate I decided to make my ship somewhat unique in the SC&H fleet by outfitting her with closed gun ports. I love the black and white checkerboard look of these sailing ships and you really lose that without the lids. Since I don't envision trying to do a broadside of working guns anytime soon I also decided to not even cut out the gun ports.

The lids themselves were made from thin basswood strips. The hinges were made from copper tape painted bronze color, with pin marks to simulate bolts and small metal rings on each end. To finish the look I added a white rhombus shaped detail cut from plastic in the middle. Considering the time it took to finish all twenty I can only marvel at the people who tackle the Victory size models with their 100+ guns.

As a side note, I tried six or seven times to draw a rhombus pattern using ruler, pencil and Mark I eyeball... with little success. Who knew it was so hard to draw and cut a tiny rhombus? My bemused wife got on the computer, imputed the dimensions in Word and printed it out in about 30 seconds. Guess she wants her namesake to look prim and proper lol.

Deck. Next I squeezed the deck into the hull and clamped down the bulwarks to get a feel for how it will eventually get glued together. I had to do a little bit of sanding on the bulwarks to get them to fit tightly. Right now I'm thinking of using Bondo like Dan did for the underside waterproof seal. This looks to be the most challenging part of the entire build.

Crew. Meanwhile the Theresa Maries made their first inspection of the shipyard. Not a bad looking crew so far: Captain, 3 officers, 1 midshipman, 2 dignitaries and 9 seamen. Press gangs may be out looking for more in the future.

Gun #1. While I studied all the steps needed to glue the deck and bulwarks in place, I took some time to assemble the gun carriages. I painted one cannon bronze to see how it would look. I'm thinking of extending the forecastle a little bit and rigging one or two bow chasers up top. Since she won't be brandishing broadsides, having some cannons with gun crew upfront might be a nice touch.
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 07:18 PM
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Captain Andrew--I scrapped the rubber wheels on the gun carriages and made new ones from wood. The rubber looked horrible even when painted.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 05:39 PM
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United States, IN, Indianapolis
Joined Nov 2010
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Week 5

Hull flange. For some reason the inside lip of the main rail of my hull was larger on the starboard side by a good 1/8 inch. So some loud time was had using Dremel and rattail file to even it up to the bulwark's thickness. (Insert "I love the smell of fiberglass shavings in the morning" joke here.)

Gun carriages. Next I gave the gun carriages a couple of coats of stain with brown paint mixed with clear waterproofing. Looks much better than a straight coat of brown or black, so I did some paint-removing from my first two carriages.

Then I drilled seven tiny holes in each carriage and added three screw eyes to the body and four cut nails to lock the wheels in place. Not sure what to do about the unimpressive looking rubber wheels yet. 72 wooden wheels to make?... ugg.

More crew. Another search on ebay for 1:24 and G Scale figures resulted in three new recruits joining the ranks of the Theresa Maries. After some alterations to conceal their "Pirates of the Seven Seas" origin they were designated as future topmen because of their smaller size (compared to the more hefty 1:20 Papos) . And to give a small shout out to the "Pirates of the Caribbean" series I even broke down and bought the one 1:18 figure that wouldn't be too big: Marty Klebba (aka Gore Verbinski) whose figure stands at an acceptable 2 1/2 inches.

Happy Hen Toys also had a sale on some of their farm-themed Papo figures so another group of seven were conscripted and converted to serve aboard. Current muster list: Captain, 3 officers, 1 midshipman, 2 dignitaries with 1 attendant and 18 seamen. Arrr she'll be a lively ship.

Deck supports. According to the directions and other modelers here's how you're suppose to hold the deck in place to glue the support blocks precisely to the hull: "...lift the deck up and support it with bendable sticks wedged to the internal keel space or folded foam rubber, tight against the bulwark." After some attempts I became dubious of this working well for me.

So new plan. First I cut 20 small basswood squares (oak wood didn't seem to work as well). Next I clamped the bulwarks in place as tightly as I could. Then I put superglue on the blocks and one by one pushed them up in place, using a great deal of pressure to make sure everything was tight as a drum. Worked pretty well.

I also purchased a one pound can of Bondo for gluing the deck. I'll probably use some to reinforce the support blocks so I can get some practice working with it.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 08:11 PM
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Wheels -
Make slices off a wooden dowel. Two different wheel sizes are needed front and back to allow for the slope of the deck.
Slicing a dowel in a jig for consistent thickness and then drilling thw axle hole using a jig makes it go pretty quick.

SCUPPERS! I could not get the described method in the instructions using a jig to work at all. What worked for me was marking the exterior of the hull where the scuppers should be, then marking the inside. Drill a small pilot hole from the outside inward and one from the inside outward, eyeballing to get them to intersect. Once intersected, the small holes are drilled out with sequentially larger drills untill the holes accept the scupper tubes. Cut the tubes long, epoxy them thoroughly in place, and then cut them close and sand flush with a Dremel.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 09:03 PM
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Hi Andrew

Great job! Keep up the good work, I'm right behind you. : )

Dan- Thanks for the continued tips and wisdom.

best regards
Tim
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Old Oct 04, 2012, 04:13 PM
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Dan,

What kind of glue did you use to attach the mechanical hatch back seal to the hatch?
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