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Old Oct 15, 2012, 11:06 PM
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United States, NH, Bedford
Joined Jan 2012
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Been quietly watching, but really like the back lit test of the leading edge and aileron gap. Definitely going to use that shortly on my current build. Great tip!
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Old Oct 16, 2012, 09:36 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
Joined Nov 2004
3,513 Posts
First, thanks for the replies. Been away hiking in the mountains, but got back to the workbench a little tonight.
Couldn't stand the idea of plain wire on the landing gear, so I made some struts. I had some scrap aspen from the Lowe's so I ripped a few blanks, then used the narrow kerf blade to put a groove off center. Then I planed and sanded to an airfoiled shape. When the time comes this will get epoxied to the wire and painted with the wheel pants.
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Old Oct 16, 2012, 10:02 PM
wood is good
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United States, CA, Marina Del Rey
Joined Jun 2012
1,350 Posts
Gear leg fairings seem to go hand in hand with wheel pants.
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 02:58 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
Joined Nov 2004
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As well made as this kit is, I still want to have some adjustments during trimming. So I made a wing jacker that operates on the rear alignment pin. I'll make one for each side so I can adjust the incidence together to trim out any wheel/canopy pull in knife edge or separately if there is some roll correction required. The usual solutions to incidence are drooping or reflexing the flaperons, but I figure this would be more elegant and let the ailerons stay trimmed with the wing roots.
The solution is a ply plate with a right angle plate glued on. Through the right angle plate is a 6-32 nylon bolt with a lock nut. The hole is a clearance hole so the bolt/nut can turn on the plate but has no slop. The lock nut keeps things tight when the screw is turned. Underneath is a threaded 6-32 block. Toward the front is a #4 screw pivot so that the nylon screw has a lot of mechanical advantage. There is a horizontal slot in the side plate and a vertical slot in the fuselage side, so when the screw is turned it raises or lowers the alignment pin in as small an increment as necessary. Now that I have the prototype the other three (1 for me and 2 for mark if he wants them; speak up mark) will just be quick copies.
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 06:14 PM
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United States, FL, Oviedo
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Very cool!
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 08:25 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
Joined Nov 2004
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Very cool!
Thanks! Don't know why I didn't think of this before now.
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 08:07 AM
Honeybadger don't care...
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Orlando, FL
Joined May 2010
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Now that I have the prototype the other three (1 for me and 2 for mark if he wants them; speak up mark) will just be quick copies.
Simply ingenious! Very cool Mickey, can't wait to see how this works on the plane!
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 07:44 PM
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Is stock wing incidence likely to be wrong? I give Bill more credit than that. I've never really bothered to fiddle with it on any model. Well maybe once in several years so far, and I can't remember what model it was or whether my fiddling helped or not...

Your adjustment scheme looks clever and well-executed but I'm wondering about the risk vs. benefits.

When I was building my big Quaker earlier this year I gave serious thought to implementing some kind of incidence-adjustment scheme for the horizontal stab. Just couldn't think of anything that would be as reliable as the stock arrangement -- at least not without fancy parts or machining.

I gave up on the idea and built it stock... and it flies fine. Just lucky I guess.
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 09:47 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
Joined Nov 2004
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Is stock wing incidence likely to be wrong? I give Bill more credit than that.
I'm not knocking the kit design or incidence. I've built several stevens kits and I'm always happy with them.
But this is a 3d airplane and there is always a lot of tweaking to get everything dialed in, especially knife edge, so it doesn't pull or roll out. Almost every airplane either takes droop or reflex, I just figured I'd do that a different way out of curiosity. I haven't opened the stock slots just yet, so the first flight will be with the stock incidence

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Your adjustment scheme looks clever and well-executed but I'm wondering about the risk vs. benefits.
The risk is low at this point as the slots haven't been enlarged. Even if they are the load on the pin is low, even lower on the screw and pivot. Weight gain was only a few grams. Potential benefit is that the knife edge and upright/inverted balance can be dialed in perfectly. This is a pretty big benefit for some of us.....
Agreed that the risk/reward is not there on something like the Quaker where knife edge is not part of the envelope.
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 10:25 AM
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United States, OK, Henryetta
Joined Nov 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnowell129 View Post
As well made as this kit is, I still want to have some adjustments during trimming. So I made a wing jacker that operates on the rear alignment pin. I'll make one for each side so I can adjust the incidence together to trim out any wheel/canopy pull in knife edge or separately if there is some roll correction required. The usual solutions to incidence are drooping or reflexing the flaperons, but I figure this would be more elegant and let the ailerons stay trimmed with the wing roots.
The solution is a ply plate with a right angle plate glued on. Through the right angle plate is a 6-32 nylon bolt with a lock nut. The hole is a clearance hole so the bolt/nut can turn on the plate but has no slop. The lock nut keeps things tight when the screw is turned. Underneath is a threaded 6-32 block. Toward the front is a #4 screw pivot so that the nylon screw has a lot of mechanical advantage. There is a horizontal slot in the side plate and a vertical slot in the fuselage side, so when the screw is turned it raises or lowers the alignment pin in as small an increment as necessary. Now that I have the prototype the other three (1 for me and 2 for mark if he wants them; speak up mark) will just be quick copies.
Wonderful idea! Brilliant actually. A mechanical method to trim out any bad habits. Most folks just use their radio.

Frank
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 03:43 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
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Wonderful idea! Brilliant actually.Frank
Well thanks!

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Most folks just use their radio.
Me too for the past who knows how many aerobatic airplanes. But that has never been totally satisfying and sometimes you can't de-funk everything at all speeds, where you knew if you could just shim the wing or tail you could get it right. So here is my chance. After all the thinking about how to do it, in practice it was pretty simple, so I will do this again on future airplanes. Cost/weight is neglible.
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 12:48 PM
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I'm hoping it works. I can't wait to see if it does.

Frank
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Old Oct 26, 2012, 10:21 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
Joined Nov 2004
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Finally back to the build.
Went off on a tangent with color. We decided to use Ultracote parklite yellow as a base layer, so I went off on a hunt for matching paint. I finally found a good match with Krylon spray paint from WalMart. Picture shows the match with the spinner and a quick spray on leftover plastic from the cowl.
I reinforced the cowl with fiberglass. First a quick spray with 3m77 on the glass, then it sticks in place. Some 30 minute epoxy was then brushed on.
Some final trimming on the canopy. Masking tape was used to mark the trim lines; this made it easy. Then the canopy was trimmed with scissors. I'll tape it on until the incidence is set right during flight trimming.
Mark made it by and made progress on his fuse.
Now that I have confidence in the paint match I will start the final assembly/hinging/etc.
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Old Oct 27, 2012, 07:52 AM
Honeybadger don't care...
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Orlando, FL
Joined May 2010
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I found the series of steps I performed last night building the fuselage to be very straight-forward. I used Mickey's suggestion earlier- and glued the blind nuts onto the firewall with JB Weld, and discovered that Mickey has the right tool for any job- a must in this hobby!

My next step- sheet the fuselage!
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Old Oct 27, 2012, 10:09 PM
Mickey from Orlando. Really.
Joined Nov 2004
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Finishing details underway now that everything is framed.
One of the secrets to model building is to find ways to make things you suck at easier to do. Trying to hinge slots in an angled surface is hard, so don't do it. I take a fine line marker and scribe a centerline on the hinged surfaces, then cut the slot in multiple passes with an exacto. The surfaces match up well this way. After the hinge slots are made, then the angle is sanded in. Even if the sanding is goofed up the surfaces still line up with each other.
The cowl is coming along, a little putty sanded out followed by some water based primer that was brushed on. This got sanded out with wet or dry paper with some running water. Last picture is after a light coat of automotive gray spray primer. This will make the final spots that need filling show up better. A little more putty, sanding, then a coat of white for a base coat, then ready for color.
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