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Old Sep 29, 2012, 06:15 AM
Honeybadger don't care...
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How does JB Weld hold to the wood surface? Would you have to do the CA step if you were able to just get the blind nut seated properly (e.g. could you just straight- JB Weld it)?

Also- did you check the holes line up with the intended motor you plan to use?

Looks like I have some work to do...
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Old Sep 29, 2012, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Luv3d View Post
How does JB Weld hold to the wood surface? Would you have to do the CA step if you were able to just get the blind nut seated properly (e.g. could you just straight- JB Weld it)?
JB Weld holds great to the wood surface.
Adding CA just holds the nut in place while you put the JB on. It only takes 10 seconds to hit them with thin CA, so there is no reason not to do it. Besides the thin CA wicks down the hole and provides additional strength.

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Also- did you check the holes line up with the intended motor you plan to use?
It's not for the motor per se, but for the wooden motor mount box. If I were doing it for the actual motor I would have mounted the motor with the blind nuts, then applied the CA, then carefully removed all the screws and then applied the JB weld. The jist of the process is to glue the blind nuts in while they are aligned with the screws.
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Old Sep 29, 2012, 02:48 PM
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There are also other choices for mechanically attaching blind nuts:
http://www.nutplates.com/images/nutp...ple3_large.jpg
Interesting, thanks.
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Old Sep 29, 2012, 03:29 PM
Honeybadger don't care...
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Ok- got it, thx.

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Originally Posted by mnowell129 View Post
JB Weld holds great to the wood surface.
Adding CA just holds the nut in place while you put the JB on. It only takes 10 seconds to hit them with thin CA, so there is no reason not to do it. Besides the thin CA wicks down the hole and provides additional strength.


It's not for the motor per se, but for the wooden motor mount box. If I were doing it for the actual motor I would have mounted the motor with the blind nuts, then applied the CA, then carefully removed all the screws and then applied the JB weld. The jist of the process is to glue the blind nuts in while they are aligned with the screws.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 03:43 PM
Promoting Model Aviation...
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Originally Posted by loNslo View Post
There are also other choices for mechanically attaching blind nuts:
http://www.nutplates.com/images/nutp...ple3_large.jpg
I've never seen nutplates (some call them plate nuts) used for wood though. They require rivets to secure.

Frank
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 03:53 PM
wood is good
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Originally Posted by Murocflyer View Post
I've never seen nutplates (some call them plate nuts) used for wood though. They require rivets to secure.

Frank
Actually one can use self-tapping screws or even through-bolts with self-locking nuts. Though the larger base provides more surface area for simply attaching with epoxy.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 04:19 PM
Promoting Model Aviation...
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Yea, I guess you could do that. BTW, where does one find nutplates outside of the aviation industry? I suspect they are not a very common sight in your LHS.

Frank
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 06:39 PM
wood is good
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The internet is a wonderful place to shop.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 09:05 PM
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A little more progress now that the JB weld is cured.
The fuse sides were sanded flat on the bench so they were true before gluing to the main box.
Main fuse parts assembled. The main fuse was held down with a sandbag. These are handy to have on the bench (aquarium gravel and old socks!).
The sides were held true with triangles while things were glued up.
After it was tacked with CA the thinned LMI glue was put on all the joints with a small paint brush to control the application and keep the weight down.

Sorry Mark, had time to move ahead tonight.
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 09:08 PM
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Another great tip: aquarium gravel and old socks.

She's really looking good.

Frank
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 06:38 AM
Honeybadger don't care...
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Sorry Mark, had time to move ahead tonight.
No worries, Mickey- looks great!
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 10:21 AM
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Ok so I took a few minutes this morning to move things along.
Here is a dirty secret, anyone with enough patience can build a beautiful airplane. But it's also true with enough patience you can lay tile as well. The difference is that tile guy can do it 10 times faster and it looks just as good. The thing with models and limited time (myself) is to know when it's important to slow down and when it's important to just do something and move on.
In this installment its time to slow down. Why? Because this shows installing the front upper sheeting on the fuse. The joint between the sides and sheeting is in a very obvious place on the airplane, and everyone will see it. The glue joint on the bottom of the fuse under the stab won't get that much scrutiny, nor will the joint on the bottom of the fuse right below this sheeting area.
So here we want a nice joint that will hopefully be invisible to the covering (or if it's ugly this is where we put the color change line, another dirty secret).
My technique is as follows.
First use the little stick sander to clean up the formers until the sheeting sits just flush with the sides. Then tape the sheeting SNUGLY to the sides and make sure it's nice and smooth. Open the thing like a door, smear in some white (LMI) glue, but not too much to ooze out everywhere. Then close the door. Use a little tape to hold the tiniest bit of tension on the sheeting while it dries. Next roll the sheeting down, CA'ing to the formers as you go. Finally use a straight edge to trim the sheeting down the center of the down the longeron to leave a lip for the other sheeting. THEN glue the sheeting to the center longeron. Pictures show the glue joint wet, with the tape peeled to show alignment, then when dry with no sanding. Then with the single light bulb test after the initial sanding.
TTFN
mickey

P.S. all interior joints are painted with full strength white glue using a paintbrush.
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 11:28 AM
wood is good
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Beautiful job!

Didn't you need to wet the sheeting to get it to bend?
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 11:43 AM
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Beautiful job!

Didn't you need to wet the sheeting to get it to bend?
Thanks and no. Stevens thoughtfully etched relief lines in the sheeting where it needs to curve. Easiest sheeting ever. Ordinarily I use water or ammonia on the outside.
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 04:52 PM
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A productive lunch hour today.
The top sheeting technique is repeated on the other side, almost. The sheeting is glued most of the way until it overlaps. Next I held the sheeting down, and pierced the sheeting with the knife to make a mark on top (highlighted with a pencil). Then a straight edge was used to trip almost to this line ( a little proud). Then the block sander was used to take tiny bits away until the sheeting fit perfectly with the line that was cut in the other sheeting. Then it's glued down. Shown is the join line before and after sanding.
Motor mount box was built up like a lego set, then stuck with the CA followed by thinned white glue all around. It may be hard to tell in the photos but the thinned white glue fills in the joint and pulls it down tight. Applying it thinned with a paint brush doesn't leave a big blob of glue in the joint that just adds weight.
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