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Old Sep 10, 2012, 01:23 AM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
United States, CA, Tehachapi
Joined Nov 2005
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I'll say. Looking good. Nice building table you have there as well. Looking forward to seeing both builds and glad to have you building.

Frank
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Old Sep 21, 2012, 10:36 PM
Honeybadger don't care...
Luv3d's Avatar
Orlando, FL
Joined May 2010
1,456 Posts
Teach a man to fish...

We got to build together today. When we stopped last time, we had built the empennage and one side of the fuselage.

Today we opened Mickey's kit and he started to build his empennage. I continued to build the fuselage.

Accomplishments today include building the left side of the fuselage, as well as the bottom of the fuselage- which houses a battery tray. Today was about production- finding pieces, matching, pinning, gluing, etc... Knowing when to debur spots, what to sand and how much...using the tools we introduced on day one. In the end- another successful few hours.

At first, when we decided to put all the parts together after our first day of building, I felt kinda' funny about it...almost juvenile. But I discovered something important from this little ritual at the end of the building day- it got me excited, and kept me enthused for the next 2 weeks!

So to continue the ritual we have started- we put the fuselage work together with the other built parts. We had enough of an airframe to compare it to a similar-sized ARF. You can really see this airplane coming together.

Lastly, since I was building a fuselage and Mickey was building his empennage, we thought it would be fun to lay the completed parts side-by side. This is the first of many moments where we can document common progress in our builds!
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 08:57 AM
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Well, we now broke ground on two airplanes.
I've got the fin and rudder done, sans white glue reinforcements.
Mark surged ahead with the fuselage with little help from me. A little demonstration plus a well designed kit with instructions goes a long way.

____/----- up on soapbox
To all kit makers out there. A build thread is not a good substitute for well written instructions. Especially for beginners. Build threads are full of off topic "looking good" comments that make it hard to follow the directions. If you want to encourage building, provide (an online PDF is fine) well written and photographed instructions.
---\____ down from soapbox

The ritual of putting the big pieces together provides some big picture vision of an airplane coming together. Important in my book.

If anyone is interested the little red gadget is handy to get things square; cheap too. It's called an up-right and has spacing for three different thicknesses.
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...P?I=LXM406&P=8

No real tips this time, just put the flat sub-assemblies together, being mindful of keeping things flat on the building board.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 09:34 AM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
United States, CA, Tehachapi
Joined Nov 2005
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Coming along very nicely and it looks like your student is doing just fine.

And I have some of those alignment jigs but always forget about them.

Keep up the good work and excellent build thread.

Frank
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Old Sep 25, 2012, 10:04 PM
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Deja vu, all over again.
Got back to the bench finally. Got the horizontal stab and elevators glued up and sanded out. Filler applied and sanded out where the carbon fiber goes in the slot in the elevator.
Made a little dent sanding. Decided to show that it can be taken out easily. Just apply a little saliva and apply heat with a heat gun and the dent expands back out. A pic from the shop just for variety.....
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Old Sep 25, 2012, 10:25 PM
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Another shop pic.
oops.. needs resizing...
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Old Sep 25, 2012, 10:52 PM
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United States, CA, Long Beach
Joined Sep 2011
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What is that plane to the right of the slow stick? It looks like a slow stick on steroids.

Robert

Quote:
Originally Posted by mnowell129 View Post
Deja vu, all over again.
Got back to the bench finally. Got the horizontal stab and elevators glued up and sanded out. Filler applied and sanded out where the carbon fiber goes in the slot in the elevator.
Made a little dent sanding. Decided to show that it can be taken out easily. Just apply a little saliva and apply heat with a heat gun and the dent expands back out. A pic from the shop just for variety.....
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Old Sep 26, 2012, 01:25 AM
Got Foam?
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United States, TN, Greeneville
Joined Sep 2011
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I noticed you are using Mercury and Zap CA, can you tell any difference between the two?
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Old Sep 26, 2012, 05:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingconsulting View Post
What is that plane to the right of the slow stick? It looks like a slow stick on steroids.

Robert
A stevenaero soarstick. I built this as a trainer/testbed. What looks like a receiver hanging down is really a Eagle Tree guardian (that works pretty well so far). Nice platform for trying things out on. Covering is ultracote parklite.
http://www.stevensaero.com/StevensAe...K-p-18664.html

The fuse and all the other parts came from the LHS. They are all the millenium rc stuff, including steerable tailwheel.
http://www.millenniumrc.com/SlowStickX_XTrainer.html
BP brushless motor.
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Old Sep 26, 2012, 05:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjcmyers View Post
I noticed you are using Mercury and Zap CA, can you tell any difference between the two?
Yes.

This is just my opinion of course, but there is no equal to Pink Zap. I've looked for one for years. The mercury is pretty close and acceptable, but my goto thin CA is pink Zap. Same is true for the Green Zap. People try to save a few $ on CA and there is a noticeable difference.

There is a good reason why when you buy CA from StevensAero you get Zap:
http://www.stevensaero.com/ZAP-CA-Thin-p-1-c-303.html
http://www.stevensaero.com/ZAP-A-GAP...p-1-c-304.html

I've used CA since the original Hot stuff in the 70's. My opinion is simple. If you build balsa airplanes you need to use Zap.
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Old Sep 26, 2012, 07:25 AM
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United States, CA, Long Beach
Joined Sep 2011
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Great thanks. Might be fun to do that for our slow stick.

Robert

Quote:
Originally Posted by mnowell129 View Post
A stevenaero soarstick. I built this as a trainer/testbed. What looks like a receiver hanging down is really a Eagle Tree guardian (that works pretty well so far). Nice platform for trying things out on. Covering is ultracote parklite.
http://www.stevensaero.com/StevensAe...K-p-18664.html

The fuse and all the other parts came from the LHS. They are all the millenium rc stuff, including steerable tailwheel.
http://www.millenniumrc.com/SlowStickX_XTrainer.html
BP brushless motor.
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Old Sep 26, 2012, 08:19 PM
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More progress.
Got the side frames and bottom assembly and hatch done.
Some notes:
In one picture I show a ruler laid against the top edge of the side frames. This is to keep this straight. Even though the parts fit is superb, you can still misalign the pieces a little, so the ruler keeps this whole assembly inline.
A straight edge is used in the same manner to make sure the bottom is straight. A couple pictures show something that should not alarm a beginner. They show the front of the side frame aligned on the plans, but the rear portion doesn't line up exactly. This is not a mistake in the kit, it's that paper plans change size with humidity (hint: I'm in Florida, Stevens printed the plans in Colorado!) But the laser cut parts fit each other so make sure they fit together properly, even if they don't exactly match the plans. Hence the ruler to make sure these parts are straight. Also a straight line on the plans, like the top edge of the side frame will still be straight if printed lengthwise or widthwise on the plans, so it can be used to line things up. Just ignore the other lines.
The hatch pictures show something I call CA clamping. It's hard to get glue in the center of a big lamination like the hatch. Also the white glue makes this assembly tougher. Thick CA is too hard to use in a big lamination like this. So I put white glue in the middle, spread it around with my finger, then press the parts together, pin down and then CA all around the edges. The CA clamps the whole perimeter down, cuts down on any warping that might try to occur due to the water based glue and lets you move on with the assembly. I do this often.
I did a little kit bash and added some stiffeners on the bottom of the hatch, just some scrap stock.
The bottom assembly is an outside part of the fuse and will have covering on it. So I took this chance with the whole assembly with the long tbar sander to get it all true, including the hatch. This was a good time to do this so that it could be trued up while being held flat. It's important to know when to true things up and get things all ready for covering. Covering hides nothing! So it's important to make sure all the outside surfaces that will take covering are perfect. Finding the right time to do this takes a little thought as you build.
Final pic is two fuse's side by side.
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Old Sep 27, 2012, 12:19 AM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
United States, CA, Tehachapi
Joined Nov 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnowell129 View Post
Yes.

This is just my opinion of course, but there is no equal to Pink Zap. I've looked for one for years. The mercury is pretty close and acceptable, but my goto thin CA is pink Zap. Same is true for the Green Zap. People try to save a few $ on CA and there is a noticeable difference.

There is a good reason why when you buy CA from StevensAero you get Zap:
http://www.stevensaero.com/ZAP-CA-Thin-p-1-c-303.html
http://www.stevensaero.com/ZAP-A-GAP...p-1-c-304.html

I've used CA since the original Hot stuff in the 70's. My opinion is simple. If you build balsa airplanes you need to use Zap.
Thanks for the glue advice. I was looking for that info when I made this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1728970

Frank
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Old Sep 28, 2012, 11:58 PM
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Ok, So I hate blind nuts. It probably stems from having one come loose way up inside a closed up fuselage on the back side of a firewall. But they are useful sometimes. The next step in the Edge is to build up the firewall. There are four blind nuts on the back side. The instructions just say to drive the blind nuts in and add some CA. There are few problems with this. 1) Blind nuts don't hold very well in liteply after a few removal cycles. 2) Just driving them in doesn't always get them in straight. 3) With no special action, blind nuts don't always draw up all the way. Especially in plywood.
So here are my tips. First, notice the blind nut, it has a radius where the threaded portion turns out into the flange. To adjust for this I radius the lip of the hole with a countersink bit. You can just use a drill bit that's way bigger than the hole if you don't have a countersink.
Next instead of just pushing the nut in, I put a bolt and washer on the other side and screw it down real tight till the blind nut pulls up. The guarantees that the blind nut is in true and the screws don't end up at weird angles on the other side. I've had this happen. After you pull them in snug, then apply some CA to hold them short term. Finally to make sure the blind nut stays put I bury it in JB Weld. Specifically JB weld because its thick so you can get it piled up on the nut and it won't run away and you can put it on without getting it into the threads. Regular epoxy will drip down into the threads. How do I know this ?? .....
Anyway a few simple things to make the pesky blind nuts, not so pesky.

mick
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Old Sep 29, 2012, 12:49 AM
wood is good
loNslo's Avatar
United States, CA, Marina Del Rey
Joined Jun 2012
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There are also other choices for mechanically attaching blind nuts:
http://www.nutplates.com/images/nutp...ple3_large.jpg
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