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Old Oct 29, 2012, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by EJWash1 View Post
CaffeenMan,

I had some Du-Bro 6-32 blind nits on-hand and three rejected (hard maple) presses. My presses measure 5/8" tall, 3/8" wide, and 3" long. After enlarging the holes using an #13 bit, I used my 2-ton arbor press to seat the blind nuts in place. No splitting. As a matter of fact, when I tapped the blind nits out of the rejected presses, the wood chipped at the prongs which indicates a pretty good hold.

Not sure if I'll revisit the presses and install blind nits or not. I just wanted to see if the hard maple would split using the arbor press or not.

EJWash
Not as powerful as an arbour press but a vice might get someone by that does not own a press.. The larger the vice the more pressure is appliable.
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Old Oct 29, 2012, 09:50 AM
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Thanks for the suggestion. The customer would be installing the nuts so asking them to grind off hardware isn't how I want to do things.

I'm going to do two things. First, I'll put a page on my site about how to do the modification if the customer wants to do it or already has the presses and doesn't want to send them back to me and wait to get them back.

Second, I'll offer the modification as an additional service that will include all the drilling and hardware.
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Old Oct 31, 2012, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by CafeenMan View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. The customer would be installing the nuts so asking them to grind off hardware isn't how I want to do things.

I'm going to do two things. First, I'll put a page on my site about how to do the modification if the customer wants to do it or already has the presses and doesn't want to send them back to me and wait to get them back.

Second, I'll offer the modification as an additional service that will include all the drilling and hardware.
Sorry,was not aware these where for resale.
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Old Oct 31, 2012, 09:26 AM
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I figure that. But it is a good idea for anyone making their own set if they don't want to mess with drilling all those holes.
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Old Nov 02, 2012, 07:00 PM
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made the leap

Despite being cheap, and what my kids call a tightass, I have ordered a set of these fixtures.
Simply put, I can see the value.

Looking forward to using these in future models.

There is real pleasure in taking your time and doing a build that does not need corrective actions.
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Old Nov 03, 2012, 06:05 AM
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Hi Peter, You're packed and ready to go as soon as the post office opens this morning. You'll get a shipping confirmation with a tracking number. Thanks!

(Sorry again for the hijack, EJ).
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Old Nov 03, 2012, 11:26 AM
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NO problem. Hopefully this thread is serving as a comparison to making your own System versus buying one. All along I've said that I wanted to tackle the challenge of making my own. You can see what it has taken me to do so. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, your prices are a great bargain.

As far as my progress:

- all presses and pads have been finished and are ready for service.
- all fixtures have been stained and are drying.
- 1/2" MDF has been cut for torsion box.

I'm still wrapping my head around the torsion box design. I have to set up a flat surface in order to build a flat surface...

EJWash
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Old Nov 03, 2012, 11:32 AM
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You can always use a few saw horses and shim them until a board lays flat over them. Use a long level.

I built my bench when I left the service and all my stuff was still in storage in another state. All I had was a circular saw and a Yankee push drill. So I chose to make my bench flexible so it could be shimmed flat.

If I build another bench it will probably have a torsion box bench top.
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Old Nov 03, 2012, 11:18 PM
wood is good
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Originally Posted by EJWash1 View Post
...I have to set up a flat surface in order to build a flat surface...
No, that's not true. You can build it flat using winding sticks and a stretched string or straightedge.
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Old Nov 04, 2012, 12:57 AM
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No, that's not true. You can build it flat using winding sticks and a stretched string or straightedge.
True. I picked a poor choice of words. I should have wrote "set-up" a flat surface instead of "build" a flat surface.

This is the video I have been referencing:

Torsion Box - as designed and built by David J. Marks (20 min 1 sec)


Winding sticks are used. Problem is that I'm very limited on floor space, so I'll be working on top of my woodworking bench. No biggy. Just gotta clear my workbench! HA!

EJWash
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Old Nov 04, 2012, 01:18 AM
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I build stuff like that on the front porch. I do whatever fitting in my shop but when it comes time to actually assemble I like to have lots of elbow room. That keeps my cats from learning adult words and the whole thing is not stressful.
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Old Nov 04, 2012, 01:25 AM
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I build stuff like that on the front porch.
Too funny!

EJWash
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Old Nov 04, 2012, 02:21 AM
wood is good
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In the video, I notice he doesn't use a radial arm saw (which I find much faster), but rather the table saw, for making all those many crosscuts. A small criticism is his choice of finish for the top--wax--which can contaminate work which will subsequently receive a fine finish or be glued. Also I noticed he didn't bother to apply heavy pressure with the tip of the nailer to ensure contact between the pieces being nailed, something I always do. And he didn't use cauls to evenly spread the clamping pressure when gluing the mahogany frame veneers, nor even pads to keep those decorative pieces from being marred by the clamps.
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Old Nov 04, 2012, 09:03 AM
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We used to use wax paper to separate the wood from the plans when glueing years ago. There was some disscussions then of interaction between the wax on the paper and the glue. True or not I do not know but it did sound feasable. I at that time stopped the use of wax paper as a plan separation medium. Those were the days of a lot of stick construction. Like a kit with a 36 inch wingspan was fifty cents.

I also imagine there would be no effect using instant glues but might still be with carpenter types. I was a very early advocate of using the carpenter type glues by the way. The only other practrical adhesive back then was fast drying model aircraft cement. The chemical base of that fast drying cement may have been very fast acting on the wax as well. If nothing else it was strong enough odour wise. I guess I was a glue sniffer before it became a trend. Since you never know what you are missing I wonder how many brain cells I killed. My wife could give an opinion if asked is a given.

My feeling is using jigs the jig is not usually on a glue joint drying so it would be of no real signifigance if true. The transfer of any wax to and from your fingers from the jigs might or might not be depending on what you are doing.

Since the wax is very slow to dissolve into water base glues it may be meaningles. Contamination between parts handled with wax residue from your fingers could reduce the bond strength by adding a semi wax barrier between parts is also a remote possibility I suppose though.
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Old Nov 04, 2012, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by loNslo View Post
In the video, I notice he doesn't use a radial arm saw (which I find much faster), but rather the table saw, for making all those many crosscuts.
I agree. Especially using a cross-cut sled with long stock. A radial arm or mitre saw would be better in that the stock rests stable on the table.

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A small criticism is his choice of finish for the top--wax--which can contaminate work which will subsequently receive a fine finish or be glued.
Very true. Maybe he has room in his shop for a finishing table. I was also surprised that MDF is used as the work surface. Its gonna get dinged and stained after a few projects. Guess that would add "character"...

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Originally Posted by loNslo View Post
Also I noticed he didn't bother to apply heavy pressure with the tip of the nailer to ensure contact between the pieces being nailed, something I always do.
That really got me too. Also the fact that he was just glueing the mahogany to the MDF. MDF - *Medium* Density Fiberboard. Backing the MDF on the inside with "real" wood pieces to run screws through wouldn't hurt.

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Originally Posted by loNslo View Post
And he didn't use cauls to evenly spread the clamping pressure when gluing the mahogany frame veneers, nor even pads to keep those decorative pieces from being marred by the clamps.
THAT drove me nuts!

In my case, the video served it's purpose - a reference. Now I have a good idea on how to make mine, where before, I had none.

EJWash
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