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Old Jun 05, 2012, 02:42 PM
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E-Challenged's Avatar
United States, CA, Garden Grove
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Proper Electric Powered RC Terminology

Here are some common terms and abbreviations:

Transmitter-Not a "controller", "remote" or a "radio", abbreviated TX
Receiver-Not a radio, abbreviated RX
Radio Control- Not really "Remote Control" ,abbreviated RC
Ailerons - Pronounced ale-er-ons Not "ellrons"
Electronic Speed Control or Speed Control, abbreviated ESC
Battery Eliminator Circuit- Abbreviated BEC, ( mostly built in to ESC's)
Add-on Battery Eliminator Circuit Device-No abbreviation.
Switch-Mode Battery Eliminator Circuit - Not "UBEC" ,abbreviated SBEC
Linear Battery Eliminator Circuit- No abbreviation.
Landing Gear- Abbreviated LG
Brushless Motor- Sometimes abbreviated BL
Brush Type Can Motor- No abbreviation
Brushless Outrunner Motor-No Abbreviation
Brushless Inrunner Motor-No Abbreviation
Lithium Polymer Battery-Abbreviated Lipo
Nickle Metal Hydride Batter- Abbreviated NiMh
Nickel Cadmium Battery-Abbreviated NiCD
Cyanoacrylate Glue- Abbreviated CYA
Hot Melt Glue-Often called Hot Glue
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 03:44 PM
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scirocco's Avatar
Australia, ACT, Kambah
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Nice job. Can I suggest adding:

Motor velocity constant, abbreviated Kv, measured in RPM per volt, not to be confused with kiloVolts. The inverse of the voltage constant Ke, which is measured in volts per thousand rpm.
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 03:53 PM
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dedStik's Avatar
United States, VA, Virginia Beach
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Not to be a stickler but I've called a transmitter a radio for near 30 years now. If it's not a radio then why is RC short for Radio Control and not Remote Control?
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 04:53 PM
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JetPlaneFlyer's Avatar
Aberdeen
Joined Mar 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dedStik View Post
Not to be a stickler but I've called a transmitter a radio for near 30 years now. If it's not a radio then why is RC short for Radio Control and not Remote Control?
I guess to be technically correct 'radio' is the term for the electromagnetic wave that carries the signal. So 'radio control' is correct because the plane is indeed controlled by signals carried on radio waves. The transmitter is the device that sends the radio signal, so transmitter is the technically correct term for the bit you hold.

But 'radio' is also commonly used for the actual devices that transmit and receive signals, so as long as people know what your talking about I guess it doesn't matter.

Steve
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 05:04 PM
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What is the turny thingy over there called?
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 05:18 PM
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Staffs, UK
Joined Nov 2003
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I don't think I want to call my RC infrared transmitters "radio control" since there are no radio frequencies involved but remote control works well .

Also landing gear may be called Undercarriage, abbreviated UC. Nothing to do with Control Line abbreviated C/L but sometimes oddly called U Control .

By far the most common abbreviation for Cyanoacrylate adhesives is CA. In my experience CYA is very rarely used.

And if we're being picky the correct abbreviation for a Nickel Cadmium battery is NiCd not NiCD (Ni being the chemical symbol for Nickel and Cd for Cadmium) whereas Nickel Metal Hydride should be NiMH not NiMh. Getting those wrong can be almost as irritating as getting the capacity of a battery wrong. It's measured in mAh (milliAmperes times hours) not mah or MaH or Mah or any other combination of upper and lower case letters....only mAh is correct.

Steve
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 05:34 PM
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mrittinger's Avatar
United States, MI, Roseville
Joined Dec 2000
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Yes, ailerons, not "wing flaps".

TE= Trailing Edge
LE =Leading Edge
CG (or CofG for those Europeans)=Center of Gravity, or Balance Point
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 05:45 PM
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USA, NM, Clovis
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Well for all the young whipper snappers out there, it was called "remote control" long before it was called "radio control" Include actuators, and servos, and all of the other stuff . C'mon gang lets rewrite the dictionary. Yes proper terminology is helpful, but not entirely the absolute. Flying Remote control since 1959 AMA # 8045 Amateur Extra radio operator W5ROY
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 06:20 PM
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New Zealand, Canterbury, Rolleston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dedStik View Post
Not to be a stickler but I've called a transmitter a radio for near 30 years now. If it's not a radio then why is RC short for Radio Control and not Remote Control?

You mean your wireless is your radio? And it will have valves, not tubes.

The reason to use Tx or Rx is to differentiate between which bit of the system is being talked about - Tx in your hand, Rx in the aircraft.

Reference to a Tx or Rx goes back more decades than I suspect dedStik has been around.
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 06:22 PM
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Lnagel's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scirocco View Post
Nice job. Can I suggest adding:

Motor velocity constant, abbreviated Kv, measured in RPM per volt, not to be confused with kiloVolts. The inverse of the voltage constant Ke, which is measured in volts per thousand rpm.
Have to disagree here. Kv stands for voltage constant. ref: Electric Motor Handbook, Robert J. Boucher. "Motor speed is equal to the product of the motor voltage times the voltage constant Kv..." Chapter 1, paragraph 2.

Larry
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lnagel View Post
Have to disagree here. Kv stands for voltage constant. ref: Electric Motor Handbook, Robert J. Boucher. "Motor speed is equal to the product of the motor voltage times the voltage constant Kv..." Chapter 1, paragraph 2.

Larry
Larry, I can't dispute your reference and I'm not an electrical engineer, but I can find several references where voltage constant is labelled Ke or Kb, and is in V/rpm. The e is referred to in some references as the electrical constant. It seems unfortunate that velocity and voltage start with the same letter.

This ref doesn't even include Kv, but is very specific on Ke being the voltage constant

This one from Aveox refers to the Voltage constant as Kb (which is back emf constant). The SMMA ref says they're the same.
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 08:10 PM
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I had two Microsoft tech manuals, each published by MicroSoft in the early 2000's. One said that "/" was a backslash, and the other called "\" a backslash...

Now, my personal pet R/C peeve is calling Glow engines "Nitro" engines. They've been Glow engines since the 40's, when Glow plugs became popular. "Nitro" refers only to an extra ingredient that isn't even necessary (Remember no-nitro FAI fuel?).

By the way, with 2.4, receivers and transmitters are actually transcievers...so TX and RX aren't necessarily correct.

CD
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 08:13 PM
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I've never heard of the term "velocity constant". I've been hanging around here for quite awhile reading Christian Lucas, Bruce Abbott, Louis Fourdan, Ron van Sommeren, and a host of other motor gurus. They all seem to say "Kv" is the voltage constant. Mr. Lucas, in fact, is the "L" in "LRK/dLRK".
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Old Jun 05, 2012, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C₄H₁₀ View Post
I've never heard of the term "velocity constant". I've been hanging around here for quite awhile reading Christian Lucas, Bruce Abbott, Louis Fourdan, Ron van Sommeren, and a host of other motor gurus. They all seem to say "Kv" is the voltage constant. Mr. Lucas, in fact, is the "L" in "LRK/dLRK".
Gotta admit, I thought it was voltage constant for a long time, too. I also can't disagree that Kv as voltage constant is common usage in our community, and that it's much easier to work with a constant expressed in terms of RPM per volt rather than the inverse volt/krpm, but as far as the actual term definition goes, the rest of the electric motor world seems consistent on Ke or Kb being the voltage constant, with relatively few references to the velocity constant Kv. And this thread is about being picky

I think you might misrepresent Ron: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...1&postcount=54

Dr Drela at MIT uses velocity: http://web.mit.edu/drela/Public/web/...or_measure.pdf
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Old Jun 06, 2012, 01:40 AM
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I'm a bit of a 'correct terminology Nazi' too Things have names so we should use them, it avoids confusion:
  • Horizontal Stabiliser - The horizontal flying surface at the back (dont call it the 'rear wing' or the 'elevator'.. the elevator is just the moving part)
  • Vertican Stabiliser - The vertical flying surface at the back ('Fin' also ok but dont call it the 'rudder' - the rudder is only the moving part, if fitted)
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