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Old May 02, 2012, 08:43 AM
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Matching receiver-battery?

Do you somehow have to match a receiver with the battery pack a plane is using?

I was looking at some receivers (6 channel) that had a parameter like:
"Operational voltage 3,5-9,6V"
Does that mean it would not work with a Plane on a 3S-pack? Since a 3s pack is 11,1V.
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Old May 02, 2012, 08:47 AM
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Maybe it's the ESC's job to put the correct Voltage on the receiver?
Is that usually a standard voltage, or do I have to check my ESC and match it with a receiver?
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Old May 02, 2012, 09:57 AM
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Most esc have a 5v output for BEC. Battery Eliminating Circuitry
Some have 6v output for BEC.
Some have programmable output ranging from 5.0V to 7.0V, in 0.1V increments.

Some hobbyist powers the receiver with a battery and depending on the servo being used they can even connect a 2S lipo 8.4v directly in the receiver because they are using high voltage servos.
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Old May 02, 2012, 09:58 AM
PGR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R0yalty View Post
Maybe it's the ESC's job to put the correct Voltage on the receiver?
That's how it works in typical electric power systems: The ESC has a built-in BEC (Battery Eliminator Circuit) which provides the power for the receiver and servos. But it's important to make sure the BEC can provide adequate power for the quantity, type, and size of servos you are using. The BEC voltage is pretty standard (5V) but the current capabilities aren't standard at all and often depend on how many cells (how much voltage) you are powering the ESC with.

Glider guiders and many people who fly larger powered planes will power their receivers & servos with a separate battery pack and then it's important to use a pack which provides the correct voltage as specified by the receiver. Finally, there are also external BECs available for high-current applications like planes with lots of servos.

Pete
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Old May 02, 2012, 10:01 AM
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PGR beat me to it.
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Old May 02, 2012, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PGR View Post
That's how it works in typical electric power systems: The ESC has a built-in BEC (Battery Eliminator Circuit) which provides the power for the receiver and servos. But it's important to make sure the BEC can provide adequate power for the quantity, type, and size of servos you are using. The BEC voltage is pretty standard (5V) but the current capabilities aren't standard at all and often depend on how many cells (how much voltage) you are powering the ESC with.

Glider guiders and many people who fly larger powered planes will power their receivers & servos with a separate battery pack and then it's important to use a pack which provides the correct voltage as specified by the receiver. Finally, there are also external BECs available for high-current applications like planes with lots of servos.

Pete
Thanks Pete!

My planes are 5 channel with 30A Esc with BEC output at 5V/3A. I guess thats pretty standard and I should be able to just plug a standard receiver in right?
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Old May 02, 2012, 10:38 AM
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Maybe. You need to know the amp draw of your servos.
And you need to read the fine print on your esc, about the bec capabilities.

If it's a linear bec, the amp capability drops as the cell count goes up.
If it's a switching bec, the amp capability stays pretty much at what the specs say it will, no matter the cell count.
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Old May 02, 2012, 10:58 AM
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Gaah!! theres more measuring/reading/fixing/what not to this hobby then flying!

I think that all of my time put in to the hobby so far has been 85% building, fixing, reading, measuring etc and 15% flying!
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Old May 02, 2012, 11:21 AM
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I guess it really depends on what you find rewarding about this hobby R0yalty.

If you like to build and fuss and tinker with your airplanes then the 85/15 ratio isn't that bad.

If you're the type that likes to plug in and go then purchasing ARF's or RTF's are the way to go. The manufacturers have already figured out a workable solution so that all you need to do is charge up and go.

Bottom line is that enjoy this hobby the way you want to. You seem like a builder/tinkerer to me so maybe 85% building is a good thing.

-Mike
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Old May 02, 2012, 12:13 PM
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Flying is easy, the electrics are hard. But also pretty rewarding once you start to sort it out. Give it 6 months, maybe a year. Expect to learn most of your lessons the hard way. Isn't it always that way?
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Old May 02, 2012, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Stone1295 View Post
I guess it really depends on what you find rewarding about this hobby R0yalty.

If you like to build and fuss and tinker with your airplanes then the 85/15 ratio isn't that bad.

If you're the type that likes to plug in and go then purchasing ARF's or RTF's are the way to go. The manufacturers have already figured out a workable solution so that all you need to do is charge up and go.

Bottom line is that enjoy this hobby the way you want to. You seem like a builder/tinkerer to me so maybe 85% building is a good thing.

-Mike
I do buy arfs but now I'm looking at a better tx and rx so trying to figure out if they'll work with my components
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Old May 02, 2012, 02:02 PM
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This hobby has always had a higher "fiddling to flying" ratio.

It's just today there is less fiddling than there was 20 years ago.

As long as your new rx is within that 5v / 3 amp threshold you should be fine. If that's what it came with then the servos should have no more than a 3 amp draw.
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