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Old Apr 15, 2012, 01:18 PM
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An "Official" Great Planes Christen Eagle .46/EP thread

Yea, it isn't very popular...and yea, it's overpriced. I'm only starting this thread since A) there isn't one, and B) I want a place to compile information about it. So without further delay.... ....let's get this show on the road!
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Old Apr 15, 2012, 03:27 PM
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I'll kick things off.

Bought mine about a month-and-a-half ago, after watching them for some time. When it was initially released I could barely resist, but I knew that waiting awhile would put less of a dent in my wallet! Though still largely overpriced (in my opinion!) for NIB retail, they're now becoming increasingly available in second-hand form for reasonable prices. I managed to get mine NIB from an owner who decided he wasn't going to build it, and saved almost $60 off the average NIB price of around $275.

The kit comes nicely packaged and arranged so that nothing "should" be damaged during transit. All items are wrapped in plastic, then taped to the box to prevent shifting. Hardware was sealed in individual bags. No complaints, nice job GP!

The kit is very nice! Very sturdy construction, which is great but does make it a bit heavy before the guts are installed. Mine tipped the scale at 3.9 pounds before I installed any gear; a bit on the hefty side for such a small airplane. More on that later, though.

The covering/finish is beautiful. There were a few random places that required a heat gun and/or iron to remove wrinkles, tack down covering that wasn't well-adhered, etc. I simply kept the iron hot during construction and went over these areas as needed.

The build is straight-forward; no surprises and headache-free. I was quite pleased with the simplicity, being it a biplane. Minimal construction required, and nearly all of the legwork is done for you. There are even a few nifty "expert tips" to assist you with performing the more complicated steps, if they can even be called complicated. Cool I put mine together in an afternoon/evening, roughly 6 hours.

I chose to go with EP over nitro. I'm one of the many converts, having flown nitro for quite some time but now relish in the joy that is electric flight. This is where I strayed from the manufacturers' suggestions of recommended setup - I determined their recommendations to be wholly unnecessary. Specs call for a Rimfire .55 outrunner, which can easily power this plane but is big-time overkill. As mentioned earlier, the plane minus electronics was already a bit hefty. Following the manual: a Rimfire, ESC, motor mount, lipo battery, AND receiver battery (really??? Who still uses those???) would've added another 1.8 pounds for a RTF weight of 5.7 pounds

I've had prior success with .25-sized outrunners powering 42"-wingspan biplanes, and know this setup to be adequate. Since a typical sport flyer only requires about 100 watts of power per pound for great flight performance, I determined that a motor in the 700-900 watt range would be more than sufficient. I used an E-Flite Power 25 I had lying around for the first flight, but have since upgraded to a Power 32 (the 25 was powerful enough for casual/spirited flight on 4-cell/12x8E APC, but I like having extra "punch" in reserve to use whenever I like, which just wasn't quite there with the 25). My setup is the E-flite Power 32, E-flite 60A ESC, and Turnigy 40C, 3000mah, 14.8V lipo. Also included are an APC 14x7E prop and 2-oz. Harry Higley brass prop hub. This setup allows for a 5.1 pound RTF weight, and is a hoot to fly! Unlimited vertical on command, and very impressive spins at about 1/2 throttle.

Without that heavy rimfire and receiver battery pack under the cowl I initially had problems with the CG, hence the need for the weighted prop hub. With the lipo pushed up to the firewall inside the fuselage, I couldn't quite get a neutral CG; it was a bit tail-heavy. I tried to maiden it like this with the mindset that the CG was "close enough"....I was very, VERY lucky that the first flight wasn't also the last flight THIS PLANE DOES NOT LIKE TO BE TAIL-HEAVY. In a nutshell, it was a miracle I got it down to terra firma and ONLY suffered a broken lower-left wing spar and removed landing gear. It should've been much worse.

After a temporary repair to the wing and corrections to the CG, I now have a remarkable Christen Eagle! Rather than inside the fuselage, I flew the lipo inside the cowling for several flights which alleviated the CG issue. However, I later discovered that the weighted prop hub allowed me to move the lipo back into the fuselage for easier access. At 5.1 pounds it performs admirably; 1/2 throttle for basic flight, 3/4 for spirited, and more for "hey ya'll, watch this!" I get about 7 minutes of fun per 3000mah pack, and usually have 300-400mah left on the pack upon landing (I land before my packs are fully exhausted).

Flight characteristics are somewhere in-between docile and aggressive. Control surfaces aren't overly large, and throws are limited to about 45-degrees deflection (though I don't fly with that much). It won't 3D; good luck trying though. It DOES, however, do spectacular positive flat spins, loops, rolls, hammerheads, cuban-8's, etc. Power-on and power-off stalls are clean and straight-ahead; no tendency to tip-stall and/or spin UNLESS rudder input is used....careful! Glide ratio is poor (as is for most any biplane) due to the inherent drag of two wings. Even at 5.1 pounds it'll get nice and slow with about 10-15% throttle applied, and will stay maneuverable during slow flight. Just be SURE to maintain a little speed during a descent or power-off condition; these small biplanes will get slow and go out-of-control in a hurry if you let them.

Power-on landings are best; about 10-15% throttle and she'll float right down to the runway...chop throttle with about 1 foot under the landing gear and she'll plop down without fuss. Use care not too flare too hard! Due to the air-brake effect of a windmilling propeller, I engage the motor brake to prevent the prop from turning when at 0% throttle. I learned this trick the hard way: a previous biplane with short wings and a large propeller....1)alot of air turbulence behind a windmilling propeller + 2)short wings behind that windmilling propeller and in path of turbulent air = 3)a very difficult plane to control!

Overall, this lil' Eagle is among my favorite EP aircraft and a great sport plane. It's got the looks, it's got the capability, and is a performer for an intermediate RC pilot. Hope to hear more positive stories
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 11:07 AM
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FINALLY!!! Excellent, I have been searching the universe for a decent thread for this wonderful bird and haven't found anything worth reading yet...hoping this can become a populated and useful and fair thread all about the purchase, building and flying of this most beautiful of all ARF's.

I got mine just a few days ago, actually searched for one for almost two years and couldn't find one anywhere here and the few I found available overseas could not be shipped here....I actually returned the E-flite Super Cub I had just purchased from my LHS - before even building it, because he let me know he had just recieved a consignment of Great planes good which included the last ever Eagle in this country I have no doubt. I really didn't have to think long about it, I loved the Cub deeply but I had dreamed of this Eagle in my collection from the first time I saw it 2 years ago and thought it a worthy sacrifice - it is actually priced the same as the much more detailed, feature-packed, much bigger E-flite Super Cub so yeah I agree it is overpriced, but not by much....I would have paid double that to secure one and almost bought the 1/3 Eagle when it seemed I couldn't get this bird.

Unboxing her was a great experience and I was very impressed by how well she was packaged with no damage evident anywhere. The wings look marvelous packed flat on top but give away the first surprise of this model which is how small it actually is. It's not tiny but from the millions of pictures and videos I had amassed during my pursuit of this model and being quite familiar with the more common 1/3 and .91 offerings from various manufacturers, I really expected it to be bigger, assembled it does becopme quite a bit bigger but in reality it isn't much bigger than the E-flite Pitts 12.

Then came the second surprise, how absolutely beautifully she is built and finished with flawless white covering and absolutely precisely applied trim in the beautiful eagle's head and feathers. The colors are 100% accurate against the full size and assembled I have to say this must be one of the most beautiful ARF's ever produced (not only in it's size although I must admit to being an absolute nut for the Christen Eagle type) - I can not for the life of me imagine why it was discontinued so soon after release.

I have only started 'dry' assembly, bolting on all the parts that are not permanent or which are not glued, the rest is taped in place to see how it goes together and because I couldn't wait! I lie in bed and stare at her on the floor for hours before falling asleep, she is that good looking - I am almost too scared to fly her - almost

I took her dry assembled to our most respected hobby retailer to get the right matched aluminum spinner and scale looking prop (this thing deserves no less) got a ton of attention by not only the customers but the clerks and store owners were drooling too. I found the perfect sized (58mm) polished metal spinner which finishes her off perfectly and sourced a great looking scimitar 13x10 prop which will look great once sprayed white with red tips. I also have a 3 blade 12x8 scimitar 3-blade prop but had to order a matching polished spinner so I will maiden with the 2 blade.

I can not find and likely not afford the recommended Rimfire .55 outrunner but have a great system installed on a .46 size trainer I converted consisting of the Turnigy 5055 C-400 motor (46-60 equiv.) 80A Turnigy Sentry ESC with 3A BESC built in, and a host of 6,4 and 3 cell lipos to choose from although I am quite sure I will connect my two Nano-tech 2650mha 3cells to get something closer to the manufacturer's recommendation.

Can someone please advise or comment on this setup, is it suitable for this bird....I am a little confused by what this bird needs to fly safely - usually my electric ARF's this size are powered by a 480 or .15 size, at the most a .32 size brushless, when I put the Turnigy motor on the firewall I am a little surprised by how big it is for this plane (the Turnigy 5055 C400 is as close a match in weight, size and output as the Rimfire .55 as one can get) . Why does she require such an oversized motor and prop on such a little airframe?

One thing that has played over and over in my head was something the store owner (who is a champion jet flier and one of our most experienced modellers) said to me, he was admiring the Eagle and said with absolute conviction that weight was my worst enemy on the Eagle, he said more so than any other type I have to be extreme about how I kit her out and finish her. He suggested I would be on the assumed 'hot'/fast approach and suddenly there will just be 'dust and balsa debris" on the runway coz she will drop a wing in a heartbeat. He was surprised to hear of the large size motor recommended and suggested no more than about an 1800mha 3 cell!!??? -Really?? Can someone comment please - explain his thinking here, it has me worried and confused.
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 11:38 AM
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Now here's a look at the real thing, you can see how accurate in profile and detailing the GP bird is! Also can be seen the details I want to add like the flying wires, tubes, horizon cross, etc. What an absolutely gorgeous machine - a true work of art if ever there was one in aviation!
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Old Apr 17, 2012, 11:58 AM
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....just in terms of the level of scale of this model, one area where it falls short unfortunately is the oddly shaped canopy. It lacks the large and long bubble of the Eagle II, but not nearly as stubby and is not at all shaped like that of the single place Eagle I ? With the extent to which the manufacturer went to keep the outline and shape scale (most enlarge the wing and tail feathers at least) with only the moment arm a little longer than scale, it is surprising and a pitty that more attention was not paid to producing a more accurate canopy for either the EagleII (my favorite) or the simpler I. Even the simple foam bird produced by Art-tech was more accurate in terms of the canopy......still a remarkable bird though.
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Old Apr 23, 2012, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by wingnutzster View Post
I can not find and likely not afford the recommended Rimfire .55 outrunner but have a great system installed on a .46 size trainer I converted consisting of the Turnigy 5055 C-400 motor (46-60 equiv.) 80A Turnigy Sentry ESC with 3A BESC built in, and a host of 6,4 and 3 cell lipos to choose from although I am quite sure I will connect my two Nano-tech 2650mha 3cells to get something closer to the manufacturer's recommendation.

Can someone please advise or comment on this setup, is it suitable for this bird....I am a little confused by what this bird needs to fly safely - usually my electric ARF's this size are powered by a 480 or .15 size, at the most a .32 size brushless, when I put the Turnigy motor on the firewall I am a little surprised by how big it is for this plane (the Turnigy 5055 C400 is as close a match in weight, size and output as the Rimfire .55 as one can get) . Why does she require such an oversized motor and prop on such a little airframe?

One thing that has played over and over in my head was something the store owner (who is a champion jet flier and one of our most experienced modellers) said to me, he was admiring the Eagle and said with absolute conviction that weight was my worst enemy on the Eagle, he said more so than any other type I have to be extreme about how I kit her out and finish her. He suggested I would be on the assumed 'hot'/fast approach and suddenly there will just be 'dust and balsa debris" on the runway coz she will drop a wing in a heartbeat. He was surprised to hear of the large size motor recommended and suggested no more than about an 1800mha 3 cell!!??? -Really?? Can someone comment please - explain his thinking here, it has me worried and confused.
Congrats

Read my above post about the EP setup; I'm unsure why GP's engineering department conjured up such a heavy and over-powered plane. I've been around electrics for awhile now and have done enough experimenting to know that one could certainly trade off for a smaller, and lighter, setup.

I gave them benefit of the doubt though, and my first motor was a Precision Aerobatics' Thrust 55, which is a Rimfire .55 equivalent. On a 4-cell pack the prop wouldn't turn enough rpms/develop enough thrust to even get airborne (though I didn't try either; attempting to fly a heavy, under-powered airplane is double-trouble). It would've required a 5 or 6-cell lipo to develop the rpms/thrust required...I have an abundance of 4-cell lipos and didn't want to purchase more JUST for this airplane. In my experience, motors with such a low KV-rating are meant for 3D/aerobatic airplanes - they develop alot of torque, and are meant to swing large props but require many cell lipos (weight!). On the other hand, a motor in the 800-1000KV range will swing a bit smaller propeller but will develop less torque AND equivalent thrust. Additionally, they can use smaller, lighter lipos...a necessity for this airplane, in my opinion.

GP did a fantastic job in the construction and aesthetics, but I feel they missed the mark when deciding a suitable EP powerplant. Mine flies beautifully with an E-flite Power 32/60A ESC with plenty of power in reserve, and can take as small as the Power 25. Their recommendation of a .55-size is totally unnecessary.

As for your setup...I'd recommend against it, but it's what GP recommends. Again, you'll have to run at least 5 cells (more likely, you'll need 6) in order to develop enough thrust from a 400KV motor....400kv X 22.2 volts (6-cell lipo) = 8880 rpms. Swinging a 15x6 prop, those numbers "should" develop the thrust required for flight. With my setup (E-Flite Power 32), 770kv X 14.8 volts (4-cell lipo) = 11396 rpms, more than enough thrust with a 14x7 prop. And to make a good situation better, my setup is almost a full pound lighter than GP's recommended setup; my RTF weight is 5.2 pounds against their 5.75-6 pounds.

Though a bit heavy for a bipe of this size, I find it flies quite nicely. It carries the weight well; I was surprised by how slow it will fly. But, keep in mind that my setup is considerably lighter than recommended so mine flies differently than yours will. The most important thing you can do is once you're airborne, get it up high and get it trimmed out, then do some power-on and power-off stalls. Get a feel for when/how they occur, that way you know where the threshold is and how to react when one is imminent.
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Old Apr 23, 2012, 10:02 AM
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Congrats

Read my above post about the EP setup; I'm unsure why GP's engineering department conjured up such a heavy and over-powered plane. I've been around electrics for awhile now and have done enough experimenting to know that one could certainly trade off for a smaller, and lighter, setup.
I hear ya and my initial thoughts were the same since I have a bunch of .15,.25 and .32 size motors and setups lying around, I mean the thing is slightly smaller than the E-Flite Pitts 12 which flies like a rocket on a .15 size!..... but the answer l think lies in the design and aerodynamics of this airplane. Her slightly over engineered heavy structure, scale large flat surface area, scale sized aspect ratio and relatively small control surface area, as well as the high wing loading and drag coefficient among other factors make her quite power hungry. I can therefore begin to understand why .46 cc's is just about right to get her up, keep her up and give her the 'oomph' for the scale-like aerobatics she was designed for.

Another factor would have been that the scale design with it's quite short datum to CG moment requires a substantial weight on the nose for nuetral balance let alone the safer nose-heavy condition recommended, the .46 to .55 size motors provide the right balance weight (coupled with the battery and ESC or tank) and if that means a tiny bit more power than is needed what's the harm I reckon. A smaller motor would have required either a longer nose moment which would have totally ruined her scale looks, or a stupid amount of weight in the nose adding to an already heavy and draggy airplane complicating the motor's task further.

With this recent reawakening of my love for the aerobatic/sporty biplanes I traded one of my beloved FMS giant P-51's for the Kyosho Pitts S2-C I have wanted for years now. I can tell you that these two birds look absolutely smashing side by side, they are both very pretty and are going to turn heads wherever they go. They are almost identical in size and scale. The Pitts is a little heavier and the wings longer by half an inch each side, they are both equally draggy and have very similar wing loadings.... I can tell you now if you stuck anything smaller than a .40 in that Pitts you would have a very short flight....so it stands to reason then that the Eagle should require a little more pull upfront than one would think.

Will post pics of both builds which I am building concurrently (what awesome builds they are). I am sticking a Dualsky .60 size outrunner on the Pitts which is sure to give me blistering performance which were it not for the draggy airframe would have approached vertical. I have given some more thought to your setup for the Eagle and it does seem to support what the hobby store expert suggested which is to keep the battery as small as possible - I will try a .32 on 4 cells or maybe even the very slim, very light 2650mha Nano-tec 3 cell packs I have and see how she performs, I certainly hope you are right and this is a better setup because it would suit me much better than the massive, heavy and cumbersome setup recommended. Great advice
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Old Apr 23, 2012, 09:16 PM
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I have given some more thought to your setup for the Eagle and it does seem to support what the hobby store expert suggested which is to keep the battery as small as possible - I will try a .32 on 4 cells or maybe even the very slim, very light 2650mha Nano-tec 3 cell packs I have and see how she performs, I certainly hope you are right and this is a better setup because it would suit me much better than the massive, heavy and cumbersome setup recommended. Great advice
Well, it all boils down to wattage-per-pound, really....an electric plane requires about 100 watts per pound for great performance; anything more is overkill. A 5.2-lb. airplane only really needs about 600 watts of power...the Rimfire .55 can develop constant 1000watts/1850 burst watts. As can be immediately concluded, a .55 is more than twice the motor you really need in terms of power. I suspect the reason GP recommends such a large and heavy motor is to counter the tail-heavy tendency...you're right about the datum

It's been my experience to always go with the lightest setup. Yes, you can always put a much larger than needed motor...but you'll have to fly it around like a pylon racer to keep it aloft, and it'll never perform as you'd like it to. I did have to add two ounces of weight in the nose, and with that I still came in nearly a pound under the GP recommended RTF weight. Of course they wouldn't recommend something like that, though.

Good luck with yours It's a beauty in the air!!!
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Old Apr 24, 2012, 04:30 AM
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Thanks mate! A quick question, if not for you then maybe another Eagle fan reading this ...what are the major differences in handling in slow and high speed flight and maneuvers between the larger Great planes 1.6 Eagle II and this little .46 bird? The supplier of my aircraft primers and paints has an unflown but fully built 1.6 Eagle hanging in his shop "because it has bright colors" and is willing to swop for my also unflown .46 eagle which is shiny and new. His Eagle seems to have been beautifully built with flying wires perfectly rigged and nice detailing. As far as he is concerned a new shiny Eagle ARF, although a little smaller is better for display than the slightly dusty, slightly larger example hanging in his window.

Would anyone recommend the swop? Would it be wise for me as an intermediate flier and are the costs to fly the larger Eagle on electric prohibitive? I have a brushless motor that suggests 3D performance for a 3.6kg model, and sports setup for up to a 5.6kg model which I'm sure would fly it well but would have to invest in servo's, a 100A ESC and an 8 or two 4 cell batteries. I am tempted but want to be sure - apparently the larger Eagle is legendary and well known for it's handling whereas the .46 is known to be a bit of a dog?
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Old Apr 27, 2012, 11:25 AM
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A full up weight of 6 lbs for 90" of wing is not really bad. The flight style of this plane seems to be more a Porsche, rather than a slow, barnstorming biplane.

But the mentality of the plane does seem to be toward the flying brick glow end of the spectrum.

The bigger version at 12.32 lbs is really the upper limit of a DLE gas 20cc engine. To electrify this would get into serious high cell count batteries, and high end electric motors.

I have seen videos of the bigger version, and it also is a fast flying Porsche, not a plane to slow down.
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Old Apr 27, 2012, 08:17 PM
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A full up weight of 6 lbs for 90" of wing is not really bad. The flight style of this plane seems to be more a Porsche, rather than a slow, barnstorming biplane.
Yes...and no.

In the GP video, they fly it more like a pylon racer than a stunt biplane...distasteful, and takes away from the charisma of the Eagle, in my opinion. I didn't want to fly mine like that - I prefer scale-like flight, and zooming around as they depict takes away from the scale appearance.

Being that I strayed from GP recommendations and kind-of went out on my own in terms of powerplant setup, I managed to drop nearly a pound from the recommended RTF weight of 6 pounds to 5.2 pounds. Probably a combination of a lighter setup and equivalent thrust, but mine flies remarkably well at lower speeds (considerably slower than as depicted in the GP video). It's surprisingly stable at these slower speeds as well. It'll mush when stalled unless rudder is applied, which then will induce a roll.

As I've most recently discovered though, it needs quite a bit of altitude to pull out of a vertical dive...I thought I was high enough and performed a left-hand snap roll at stall speed, and the plane went through 3 or 4 gyrations before I let the sticks go to recover. Nose pointed straight down, I estimate about 40 feet above ground and it aaaallllmmmooooossst pulled out. Pancaked into the grass Thankfully, wings were level and horizontal, so the impact only broke the landing gear...another 2 or 3 feet of altitude and it wouldn't have hit. This plane chews up airspeed in a dive/recovering from vertical! It can be fixed, second time she's on the table being repaired
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Old May 09, 2012, 09:22 AM
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Well, it all boils down to wattage-per-pound, really....an electric plane requires about 100 watts per pound for great performance; anything more is overkill. A 5.2-lb. airplane only really needs about 600 watts of power...the Rimfire .55 can develop constant 1000watts/1850 burst watts. As can be immediately concluded, a .55 is more than twice the motor you really need in terms of power. I suspect the reason GP recommends such a large and heavy motor is to counter the tail-heavy tendency...you're right about the datum

It's been my experience to always go with the lightest setup. Yes, you can always put a much larger than needed motor...but you'll have to fly it around like a pylon racer to keep it aloft, and it'll never perform as you'd like it to. I did have to add two ounces of weight in the nose, and with that I still came in nearly a pound under the GP recommended RTF weight. Of course they wouldn't recommend something like that, though.

Good luck with yours It's a beauty in the air!!!

OK, per your suggestions and after giving your reasoning some careful thought I have decided on one of two setups which should suit this bird and my flying style (scale aerobatic) perfectly..I am quite sure either will work but please have a look see and tell me what you think ya. Great thing is that these are very affordable setups and I already have most of the components lying around. Please tell me firstly if they will both work and if budget was the foremost consideration, which would you use? Maybe answer point for point, in particular I want to know which prop and battery from my options to suit the chosen motor. Both will work on the 60A but I have a lighter 50A speedo too.

Motor: Turnigy G32 Brushless Outrunner 770kv
Alternatively: Turnigy G25 Brushless Outrunner 870kv should be adequate?
ESC: TURNIGY Sentry 60amp Speed Controller
Prop: 14x8 2 blade or 12x8 3 blade, 13x10 2 blade, 13x8 2 blade, 15x8 3 blade scimitar (these are what I have lying around)
Lipo: Turnigy 2200mAh 4S1P 20C Lipo Pack - lightweight 4cell but lacks the punch and longevity of these: I have two Large and heavyish 3500 - 4000mha 20-40c 14.8V packs (nice punch and on a 1/4 scale foamie gave me almost 20 min flight times!) - or - I have 2 unused 2650mha 11.1 Turnigy Nano-tec slimpacks which I could join up to make 6 cell but I think that too much. ??
Radio: Futaba 6EX 2.4 Tx with matched 8 channel Rx
Servo's: 2x Standard JR (elevator, rudder), 2 x Hitec HS-82MG Standard Micro Servo - metal gear ( lower wing driving upper and lower ailerons)

Depending on the battery I use, even on the larger of these options (G32) I should come in well under 5.5lb and by your accounts and my reckoning should have more than enough power.

Thanks
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Old May 09, 2012, 12:19 PM
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OK, now this might be really pushing the envelope....but would this motor work - on a big 4cell, 15x8 prop, 60A ESC and as a light an Eagle as I can make it???

HobbyKing Donkey ST4010-820kv Brushless Motor


Bear in mind that I only need enough power to fly safely and perform like the full size or fly scale in other words. The odd Lomcevak, faltspin and axial roll may be necessary but I have never been into doing anything with a model that takes away from the illusion of it being the real thing.

I think this donkey will pull it just fine, please advise if you think otherwise or agree.
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Old May 21, 2012, 12:09 AM
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Your link doesn't work, but I assume it's a .40-size, 10-turn 820kv...should work fine on 4 cells, in my opinion. That's just about what my motor is (E-flite Power 32) and it flies great!
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Old May 21, 2012, 06:15 AM
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Your link doesn't work, but I assume it's a .40-size, 10-turn 820kv...should work fine on 4 cells, in my opinion. That's just about what my motor is (E-flite Power 32) and it flies great!
Sorry mate - http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...ess_Motor.html

This is the quoted prop data:
12x8 - 11.1v - 39a - 1750g Thrust
11x5 - 14.8v - 44a - 2250g Thrust
10x5 - 14.8v - 30a - 1850g Thrust

I am thinking a 4 cell 3300mha and a 12" prop??
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