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Old Mar 23, 2012, 09:51 AM
Inherent Tinkerer
Wichita, Kansas, USA
Joined Jul 2003
1,431 Posts
Question
SolidWorks - Drawing on Different Plains?

Hi All,

I have a part in SW (2008) that I'm trying to draw additional parts on but can't figure out how to draw on different plains. I've drawn what I need on the front plain but when I try to draw on other plains it won't let me. My background is doing machine drawings by hand and, needless to say, I'm still learning CAD. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Jimmy
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Old Mar 23, 2012, 05:17 PM
not bad for one eye
atlantic canada
Joined Jun 2008
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Could you post the file please?

Paul
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Old Mar 24, 2012, 04:40 AM
Registered User
Denver, CO
Joined Dec 2005
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I don't know about SolidWorks, but in many other CAD programs the features can be drawn in one plane. Then you can move them onto another axis by many means like rotation, extrusion, translation, etc. Once on the other plane many features can be used on them by referencing off that piece. Like you can draw a line connecting that piece to another, or a circle between it and, another point.
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Old Mar 24, 2012, 08:27 AM
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Joined Feb 2006
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Hi Jimmy,

Open a new assembly. (File/New/Assembly)
Click cancel (X) to exit the Begin Assembly Mode.
Save the new assembly with a name.
Now select Insert / Component / New Part
Select the front Plane The system creates a new part using a default name that you can rename by right clicking and selecting rename.
Create your part and save it.

Select Insert / Component / New part to create your next part. Now you can use the first parts geometry to create the next part and the next part etc.
It's called Top Down Assembly in Solidworks 2010 . I hope this helps

This is the book you need: Assembly Modeling with SolidWorks 2008 You can get this book from Amazon for about 18 dollars used.

Tom
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Old Mar 25, 2012, 12:40 AM
Registered User
Calgary, AB, Canada
Joined Oct 2002
1,932 Posts
Yeah, you might want to get a book. Or if you learn better by watching (as I did), these are pretty good. Might be some samplers.

http://www.video-tutorials.net/vtn/i...s4gk2lt9ckq5s4

But I'll add a few comments which hopefully will make sense (assume SW 2008 is similar to newer versions).

When you are making a part, you are free to draw (SW uses the term sketch) on any plane you like. You can create new planes in all sorts of orientations, as many as you like. You can change the plane of an existing sketch to a different plane. Whatever makes the job easier to construct the 3D features that utilize these planes. You are not confined to the first default 3 (front, top, right), but typically it makes sense to have some base feature that originates from one of them for later use.

Now you say want to make another part. Typically you dont really make a new part B off in space within the part A model document you have going. Its better if you create part B seperate (again with whatever planes works best for that particular part). Then an assembly model brings these 2 (A+B+...) together & gives you all kinds of new power & capabilities including yet more planes again that could interconnect features from parts A or B if that is of benefit.

Now as tdkamila suggested, after making part A, you can go straight to an Assembly & create part B from within it. There are pros & cons to bottoms up vs top down assembly. But thats another discussion. I just wanted to point out some things related to planes as you were asking.
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Old Mar 28, 2012, 05:02 PM
Inherent Tinkerer
Wichita, Kansas, USA
Joined Jul 2003
1,431 Posts
Thanks, Guys. Slowly getting there and can draw in different plains now. Have to figure out how to move parts within a plain as I drew all of my formers on the front plain but can't spread them out along the length of the fuselage.....

Jimmy
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Old Mar 29, 2012, 12:15 PM
roscoedude's Avatar
United States, OH, Cuyahoga Falls
Joined Oct 2006
789 Posts
Jimmy,

Here's a few sites that should help you out, the first two links in particular.

http://www.solidworkslessons.info/

http://sburke.eu/EducationalResource...sons_main.html

http://learnsolidworks.com/

Have fun,
Dean
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Old Apr 02, 2012, 08:23 PM
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USA, MA, Weymouth
Joined Mar 2004
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I'm trying to learn SW-2000, whenever time permits, myself!

Dear JTProuty& Ptxman:

The PIPE Here...I've been quite busy the past fifteen-plus months completing a over-decade-old two-year business degree program I had left behind at the end of 1998, when the then-new first-time AutoCAD position I had been hired for the year before (August 1997) was doing really well, and I didn't think that I'd ever NEED to finish it...

...well, the week of September 15-19, 2008 came along, and by the 19th I found myself OUT of work due to the Great Recession, and some 42 months later I'm still looking for work, which IS why I'm now on my last pair of classes for that business degree (graduating with it in June 2012 - as my SECOND associate's degree in my lifetime), simply to get a basic office computing position of some sort!

To get more "up-to-date" with all this, I found that a LOT of the CAD job positions in my area of New England HAVE been asking for SW fluency. After asking around at some of the RC forums early in 2011, someone managed to send me a copy of SW-2000 (I know, 12 years old ?!?) late last spring, so I could practice doing things in "some sort of SolidWorks software" to get used to it in any fashion. From all that online business degree college classwork in accounting, retailing, marketing, etc. (which leaves VERY little time for SW practice!) I'm about at the same stage as you are, JTProuty, in learning SolidWorks, even the older SW-2000 version...but since I've been around AutoCAD for two decades now, AND have learned a few basics of how to do 3D wireframe drafting in AutoCAD back in the 1990s, I might be able to help you out once I can get back to my own SW practice time after getting my degree.

AutoCAD has its own "user co-ordinate system", or "UCS" for rotating a 3D drawing's "drawing plane" to be flat with the computer screen if it's needed. The usual pick I've had in CAD software for some two decades for my RC model aircraft drafting, DesignCAD, has something similar to that, and I'll also be using it for a drawing project to be used for the Wikipedia page at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_277 to finally draw up Heinkel's own Amerika Bomber contract competitor from 1943 accurately in DesignCAD from a Heinkel factory proposal drawing in one of my WW II aviation history books...and from doing the "40-Minute Running Start" that's in the factory SolidWorks 2000 "Getting Started" factory manual an old CAD buddy of mine found for me, I'm getting used to SW myself, again, ONLY when time permits!

Joining a user group like my local one at http://www.swugn.org/swugn/calendar/...ils.htm?id=480 (their contact page) can also be of help, too...and one thing I KNOW I'll have to learn to do in time would be how to do SCREW THREADS in SolidWorks...pages like those at http://www.aboutsolidworks.com/helical_threads.htm and http://www.fcsuper.com/swblog/?p=139 will be ones I'll be consulting repeatedly, when I come to that challenge in time!

Hope a few links from this thread can be of some help...I still HAVE to finish that business degree, just to get back to work and afford RC again, after 3-1/2 years of unemployment...but once I've got the degree, and especially once I'm back at work, I'll be practicing SW again quite a bit!!

Yours Sincerely,

The PIPE....!!
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Old Apr 03, 2012, 09:30 AM
Inherent Tinkerer
Wichita, Kansas, USA
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Thanks, Guys,

Really appreciate the information!

Jimmy
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Old Apr 03, 2012, 02:12 PM
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One thing to point out when building parts in older SW revisions is to make sure you mark your origin in relation to the reference plane, it will make it a lot easier when you go to place them in an assembly. I think however 2008's mate feature already computes the relationship.
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Old Apr 03, 2012, 02:15 PM
not bad for one eye
atlantic canada
Joined Jun 2008
70 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdkamila View Post
Hi Jimmy,

Open a new assembly. (File/New/Assembly)
Click cancel (X) to exit the Begin Assembly Mode.
Save the new assembly with a name.
Now select Insert / Component / New Part
Select the front Plane The system creates a new part using a default name that you can rename by right clicking and selecting rename.
Create your part and save it.


Tom
Tom, if I understand what you're saying, then you'll be sketching in an assembly file. This can be done for layout purposes, but cannot be featured into a 3D part. If I'm wrong please correct me.

Paul
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Old Apr 03, 2012, 08:18 PM
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Paul you can create a new part this way it's called top down assembly. You save the part as an indivual part and file and it remains in the new assembly. I hope this helps.

Example on youtube:
Top Down Assembly Design SolidWorks (6 min 12 sec)


Tom
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Old Apr 04, 2012, 01:57 AM
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Calgary, AB, Canada
Joined Oct 2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdkamila View Post
.. it's called top down assembly. You save the part as an indivual part and file and it remains in the new assembly. I hope this helps.
Tom
My understanding is top down allows you to utilize references within an assembly in order to create a new part (like the video). But then you the option of saving it as a standalone part or keeping it as part within the assembly. Sound right?
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Old Apr 04, 2012, 07:31 AM
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It's not one or the other. It can be both.

Tom
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Old Apr 04, 2012, 05:16 PM
not bad for one eye
atlantic canada
Joined Jun 2008
70 Posts
Thanks for linking to the video, Tom. I should have opened SW before posting.

Paul
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