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Old Sep 22, 2012, 07:53 PM
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United States, CA, Lancaster
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I got one scaled up to 125% from Oakdale. http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...postcount=1206
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Last edited by p901P901; Sep 24, 2012 at 11:13 AM.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mshay View Post
So here's the progress so far. I haven't messed with it much but did this much in the past day and half. I'm near the planking portion of this plane and am intimidated by the planking. This is my very first kit I have built so obviously it shows. Any tips on planking this thing?
I used 3mm depron withe 2oz glass cloth.
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Old Sep 25, 2012, 08:19 PM
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Any other tips to planking?
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Old Sep 26, 2012, 08:46 AM
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Denver CO
Joined Apr 2008
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search planking
reveals tons of builds with all sorts of techniques and tips
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 09:06 AM
Big gov never Works
St. Martin's Avatar
Skunk Water, Rhode Island
Joined Jul 2002
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This is quite a project, for your first kit build, my friend! But not un-doable. I suggest using 3/32 contest grade balsa, cut in 3/8" strips. I use National balsa, Bargain grade. http://www.nationalbalsa.com/Aero_light_s/209.htm

If you do not already have one, a Master Airscrew balsa stripper is priceless. Get their razor plane while your at it. http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXAA63&P=0
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXAA64&P=0 The Stripper uses #11 blades and the razor plane, they have spares.

One of the most important aspects of strip planking, is retaining the fuselage straitness. I suggest building a jig, that holds the fuselage either up-right or inverted. And plank one side at a time. Start in the center and work out. Never place a strip on one side, without going to the other side next.

I use Gorrilla white aliphatic wood glue. Mix with a little powdered chalk, it sands and fills great. I attach the strip to the bulkheads with thin or med CA and just the sides of the strip that contact each other recieve the wood glue. Keep paper towels handy and wipe any excess away from the seam.

Before planking the other side, now is the time for any installation of ducting, fan mounts, wiring, etc. Never sand planking free-hand with just paper. Use sanding sponges, various grades attached to sticks, dowels, etc.

As far as your power system, this design was around during the roundy cell days. You have an opportunity to use a high cell, high voltage low amp system. And still retain low weight. I suggest the Minifan Pro, ARC 28-48-1.5 on 5s(1100W) or 6s(1400W) HET will also have a comparable motor of length and Kv of around 2800-2850.

I flew my 90mm RBC Panther for 3 yrs on the above with a 5s 3000. Hardly ever used full power. Also the same system used in a Savage 90mm Phantom. both used a sep Rx batt pack of the Hydra-max 750 4 cell.

Fuzz
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Old Sep 30, 2012, 06:29 PM
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Lake Charles, Louisiana
Joined Jun 2009
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Strip planking is a piece of cake & Fuzz' advice is right on the dot.
Good thing about the F-35 is that there is a lot of flat surface which is easy to skin. Not a whole lot of compound curves.

Use stiff paper (instead of cutting up your balsa) to test which areas can be sheeted in large-ish sections and which ares will need to be strip planked.

70mm fans can be made to put out a ton of power these days. The ARC motor Fuzz suggested is a great motor. I have two of them in HET fans on 5s.
You will cook it on 6s though. I'm sure Fuzz knows that. ...he's probably just gettin' old.

Here's some of my hatchet jobs to give you an idea on planking technique:
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 04:59 AM
Big gov never Works
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Skunk Water, Rhode Island
Joined Jul 2002
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Quote:
The ARC motor Fuzz suggested is a great motor. I have two of them in HET fans on 5s.
You will cook it on 6s though. I'm sure Fuzz knows that. ...he's probably just gettin' old.
ha..h..lol.. Yes it will, Julian, in the HET fan. But not in the minifan(which is why I suggested it), unless you run WOT all the time. Even HET warns against WOT full time on some of their high end motors.

Fuzz
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Old Oct 01, 2012, 05:15 AM
Da' Cajun
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Hmmmm, I may have to try one of those fancy-schmancy Minifans
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Old Oct 02, 2012, 09:16 PM
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Thanks for the info. I hope to have this thing completed when I come back from my deployment that's upcoming. 2 year project here I suppose.
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Old Oct 06, 2012, 03:03 PM
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Las Vegas, NV
Joined Dec 1996
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The F-35 and F-22 have a lot of flat surfaces or surfaces with simple curves. I scratchbuilt an F-22 ( pics in the thread here http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=311420 )and the only place I really had to use strip planking because of the compound curves was on the engine humps in the back and the upper forward fuselage from the leading edge of the wing forward to the nose. Everything else on the fuselage was 3/32 sheet balsa. I had to wet it with water (or ammonia) in a few areas to get it to bend enough but it worked. I've seen some modelers strip plank on flat surfaces or simple curves and it's not totally necessary. It does solve one problem on a simple curve (like a cylinder), and that is it can prevent the "starved horse" look. When you wet balsa with water, it expands. You wet a flat sheet to help get it to bend around bulkheads to make a curved fuselage (think of the front bottom fuselage of an F-18). When it dries it shrinks, and sometimes I forget that between builds and what happens is you get a dip between the bulkheads. Sometimes it's worse than others, it depends on how tight you make the sheeting. It can be sanded away a bit but sometimes the dip is 1/16 of an inch so there's not enough material to work with. Preventing it is a challenge, more bulkheads spaced closely together helps, but that's more parts to cut and more weight. Strip planking prevents this, but you have to worry about getting glue on all of the joints and then filling the gaps and it's a lot of sanding and filling. All for a simple curve like a cylinder. Sheet is easier! Keep in mind, I'm talking about a simple curve. For a compound curve like a lot of jets have in the nose or rear end or the whole fuselage, strip planking is the only way to get a nice, gradual curve. Think of the F-105 like boogie showed, or the F-100, F-86, etc.

The inlet ducting in that oakdale F-35 really needs work, that first or second bulkhead behind the inlet lets the cross sectional area almost double, that makes for drag and reduced performance.

I tried to fly one of these a few years ago for a guy, it had the glow Toki .18 in it, it was way underpowered and the glow fan installation was poorly done, the hatch behind the fan was not sheeted above the fan so there was air hitting a bulkhead, no wonder it only rotated when the runway edge let the main gear go down, it only gained a few feet before it rolled off to the side and damaged the fuselage.

At least Mshay you aren't going the glow route with that fan, waste of time, not enough power! Good luck!

Oh, and how long is your bird and what fan will you use? The normal size is 50 inches I think? So about 62 inches long for yours at 125%. That should be big enough to carry the weight of a 120mm fan setup at around 10 to 11 lbs. The one build you linked to was 50" long and 10 lbs. Damn, that's heavy and the wing loading must have been really high! Not a very forginving bird I bet. I built a 63" long version of my F-22 with a Turbax 120mm class fan and it weighs 10 1/2 lbs and uses 10S 5000 mah and 4500 watts. It's a LOT more fun to fly that one than the tiny 46" long twin MF 480 original!
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Last edited by Ed Waldrep; Oct 06, 2012 at 03:18 PM. Reason: I built the small F-22 7 years ago, forgot how I did some of it!
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Old Apr 10, 2013, 05:53 PM
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Joined Jan 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Waldrep View Post
The F-35 and F-22 have a lot of flat surfaces or surfaces with simple curves. I scratchbuilt an F-22 ( pics in the thread here http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=311420 )and the only place I really had to use strip planking because of the compound curves was on the engine humps in the back and the upper forward fuselage from the leading edge of the wing forward to the nose. Everything else on the fuselage was 3/32 sheet balsa. I had to wet it with water (or ammonia) in a few areas to get it to bend enough but it worked. I've seen some modelers strip plank on flat surfaces or simple curves and it's not totally necessary. It does solve one problem on a simple curve (like a cylinder), and that is it can prevent the "starved horse" look. When you wet balsa with water, it expands. You wet a flat sheet to help get it to bend around bulkheads to make a curved fuselage (think of the front bottom fuselage of an F-18). When it dries it shrinks, and sometimes I forget that between builds and what happens is you get a dip between the bulkheads. Sometimes it's worse than others, it depends on how tight you make the sheeting. It can be sanded away a bit but sometimes the dip is 1/16 of an inch so there's not enough material to work with. Preventing it is a challenge, more bulkheads spaced closely together helps, but that's more parts to cut and more weight. Strip planking prevents this, but you have to worry about getting glue on all of the joints and then filling the gaps and it's a lot of sanding and filling. All for a simple curve like a cylinder. Sheet is easier! Keep in mind, I'm talking about a simple curve. For a compound curve like a lot of jets have in the nose or rear end or the whole fuselage, strip planking is the only way to get a nice, gradual curve. Think of the F-105 like boogie showed, or the F-100, F-86, etc.

The inlet ducting in that oakdale F-35 really needs work, that first or second bulkhead behind the inlet lets the cross sectional area almost double, that makes for drag and reduced performance.

I tried to fly one of these a few years ago for a guy, it had the glow Toki .18 in it, it was way underpowered and the glow fan installation was poorly done, the hatch behind the fan was not sheeted above the fan so there was air hitting a bulkhead, no wonder it only rotated when the runway edge let the main gear go down, it only gained a few feet before it rolled off to the side and damaged the fuselage.

At least Mshay you aren't going the glow route with that fan, waste of time, not enough power! Good luck!

Oh, and how long is your bird and what fan will you use? The normal size is 50 inches I think? So about 62 inches long for yours at 125%. That should be big enough to carry the weight of a 120mm fan setup at around 10 to 11 lbs. The one build you linked to was 50" long and 10 lbs. Damn, that's heavy and the wing loading must have been really high! Not a very forginving bird I bet. I built a 63" long version of my F-22 with a Turbax 120mm class fan and it weighs 10 1/2 lbs and uses 10S 5000 mah and 4500 watts. It's a LOT more fun to fly that one than the tiny 46" long twin MF 480 original!
my bird is on the smaller side. Span is 30 inches and length is 40 inches. I started more on it today but nothing really to get excited about. Anybody want to volunteer to plank this for me? I will ship it to you!! This is my first kit and planking is something I'm sure is above my skill level and I want this plane to look good. Let me know if anyone wants to volunteer their time and skills.
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