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Old Aug 13, 2012, 11:08 AM
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Joined Mar 2010
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Because they don't know any better... I learned on NON powered gliders years ago..


NOTHING teaches you more about flying than a glider with the power OFF... Get into trouble, a little throttle and continue..

Learning energy management translates to all aircraft...

A great joy is gained in the ability to dead stick land a plane that everyone else says it can't be done!!
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Old Aug 13, 2012, 05:13 PM
buyer of the farm
United States, FL, DeLand
Joined Mar 2009
4,630 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoghead5150 View Post
this blanket statement, should not be made. i'm a beginner, i DO know about planes, my first plane is a 4 channel, i'm teaching myself how to fly, and i have NOT cratered big time. i am NOT a member of a club, i have NOT used a buddy box, and i do NOT have knowledgeable people to guide me.

that said, i did fly a 3 channel super cub about 4 times. i can say that my 4 channel e-flite apprentice is easier (to me) to fly than the super cub. i may be the "exception to the rule" but i doubt it.

the reason i didn't go with a powered glider, like the radian, for my first plane is simply because i don't care for the look of the plane. kinda like buying a car, the prius may be a good car, but i like my mustang alot better!!
Well, I made the statement. It is absolutely correct. One exception does not invalidate the reasonable conclusion. Just because YOU crossed I-75 in downtown Atlanta and did not end up as a grill ornament on a rather large, fast-moving truck does not mean that crossing busy highways with a paper bag over your head is a recommended procedure.

Look at the box on your Apprentice. What does it say about suitability for use by an unassisted newbie? That is very good advice and was not given lightly. It is valid and so is my blanket statement.
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Old Aug 13, 2012, 07:12 PM
The wind caused that!!
hoghead5150's Avatar
United States, OK, Poteau
Joined Jul 2012
617 Posts
wow. and here is a great example of the people that think their way is the only way.

choose the advise you take wisely.
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Old Aug 13, 2012, 10:02 PM
Former Futaba employee
Joined Aug 2006
1,178 Posts
I did a lot of training of new fliers on a E powered Gentle Lady and I was able to give a new pilots alot of stick time on a 3S 2300, the longest flight being 90 minutes and that being only a couple hundered feet up with not alot of thermal action.
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Old Aug 14, 2012, 01:13 AM
BGR
Foam Junkie
United States, CA, Oceanside
Joined Dec 2003
1,656 Posts
I believe a mid sized powered high wing trainer with landing gear and the help of an instructor is the best way to learn. Flying and landing a powered plane on a proper runway is something that should be mastered by every RC pilot.

However if the above is not an option a HZ Champ followed by a powered 4 channel glider will get the job done too.

The choice of ones first airplane however foolish it may seem is something that each individual must decide for themselves. Some people have a natural aptitude and are calm enough in demeanor to handle something a bit more challenging while others are not. If the desire is there the not so apt individual will perhaps be sad about the heap in the trash that used to be an airplane, but will reassess their capabilities and continue with something more appropriate.
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Last edited by BGR; Aug 14, 2012 at 01:21 AM.
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Old Aug 14, 2012, 04:52 AM
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Joined Jan 2009
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There is a good reason for the overwhelming popularity of the Multiplex EasyStar, especially as a first plane. It'll teach you about elevator control and conserving the plane's energy and momentum. It's big enough to see from afar and easy to hand-launch. But best of all, the motor and prop are up high, out of harm's way. It takes a very hard landing to put the plane out of commission.

For those with access to a large indoor space, an ultralight micro plane like the Parkzone Vapor is another great option. Not so much a glider, more of a traditional layout with regard to power system and landing gear -- but capable of very slow flight, and sufficiently rugged to withstand most crashes.

Apparently there's a coolness factor that attracts many beginners to jets, warbirds and sleek looking planes. I consider myself fortunate to be oblivious to that. Many of my planes are uncool. Flying low and slow is cool, in my book.
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Old Aug 14, 2012, 09:38 PM
BGR
Foam Junkie
United States, CA, Oceanside
Joined Dec 2003
1,656 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by rafe_b View Post
Apparently there's a coolness factor that attracts many beginners to jets, warbirds and sleek looking planes. I consider myself fortunate to be oblivious to that. Many of my planes are uncool. Flying low and slow is cool, in my book.
Yup i am not embraced by the in crowd either. I have a Champ, a 10 year old Slow Stick and a Easy Star clone (AXN Cloud Fly). No one gives my junk a second look.
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Old Aug 15, 2012, 05:55 AM
An itch?. Scratch build.
eflightray's Avatar
South Wales U.K.
Joined Mar 2003
13,651 Posts
As I had to learn to fly RC on a single channel plane, (rudder only), then all beginners should also be made to start with single channel.

Starting with sissy 3 and 4 channel stuff will never make a man of them.

People are different, some find it easy, some don't. Arguing what is best and what isn't is always down to personal opinions, and probably even more darn confusing for beginners looking for advice.

By the way, I had to look up the E-Flite Apprentice as I have never seen one. It looks like there is a bit of dihedral on that aileron wing , and some sort of devices out towards the wing tips. At least the designer thought about it when designing a trainer.
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Old Aug 15, 2012, 10:21 PM
BGR
Foam Junkie
United States, CA, Oceanside
Joined Dec 2003
1,656 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by eflightray View Post
As I had to learn to fly RC on a single channel plane, (rudder only), then all beginners should also be made to start with single channel.

Starting with sissy 3 and 4 channel stuff will never make a man of them.

People are different, some find it easy, some don't. Arguing what is best and what isn't is always down to personal opinions, and probably even more darn confusing for beginners looking for advice.

By the way, I had to look up the E-Flite Apprentice as I have never seen one. It looks like there is a bit of dihedral on that aileron wing , and some sort of devices out towards the wing tips. At least the designer thought about it when designing a trainer.
This take me way back to my first plane, a Wizard with a cox 049, rudder and elevator. Yea i'm a sissy I had an elevator, but no throttle so you can't say that I wiggle when I walk.
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 02:30 PM
Once you taste flight...
skydvejam's Avatar
United States, ME, Bangor
Joined Dec 2011
2,782 Posts
That is funny, I suppose my "first" plane was a 2 channel, throttle and rudder only. Cheap POS that I want to get another for out in front of the house for fun though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eflightray View Post
As I had to learn to fly RC on a single channel plane, (rudder only), then all beginners should also be made to start with single channel.

Starting with sissy 3 and 4 channel stuff will never make a man of them.

People are different, some find it easy, some don't. Arguing what is best and what isn't is always down to personal opinions, and probably even more darn confusing for beginners looking for advice.

By the way, I had to look up the E-Flite Apprentice as I have never seen one. It looks like there is a bit of dihedral on that aileron wing , and some sort of devices out towards the wing tips. At least the designer thought about it when designing a trainer.
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 05:52 PM
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United States, CA, Pleasanton
Joined Nov 2012
49 Posts
From a Newbe: After working with my first plane -- a pico -- I think a powered glider would be a great 2nd plane to continue learning on. The two things I need in a powered glider are 1) a noiseless motor; and 2) the capability of removing the wings during transportation and/or storage.

The only such motorized glider I've found that would allow me to remove the wings on a regular baisis, and not harm the integrity of the wing attachments, is the Phoenix. However, 1) does anyone know if the Phoenix has a quiet motor? Noise is important to me, as it severely limits the locations where I can fly. And #2) does anyone know of another powered glider that will allow for wing removal 2-4 times a week, and allow the wings and fuselage connection to not loose their integrity after several months when connected?????

Many thanks for you time and answers.
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 06:40 PM
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United States, ID, Burley
Joined Mar 2012
3,355 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArneHu View Post
I don't understand why so many beginners want start their hobby with a fast model.
Why not consider a motor glider? After the Champ, I have learned a lot with my motor gliders. I started with a Radian, then a Nine Eagles Sky surfer, for aileron training. Now I fly with a Easy Glider Elektro, with success. I have also build a Sig Riser 100, also a nice flyer, with 2 channels and spoilers.
There are many low price motor gliders out there, and they are often good fliers. Motor gliders often float in the air, and give you time to correct, if you got into finger trouble. It also great fun, hunting thermals, and you can have a long flight time on one battery. I use to bring a garbage bag to the field, but I don't need it so often any longer. I really have become a better Pilot with motor gliders. Gliders don't need to be boring, my ST Blaze, give me more than enough speed and excitement.
100% agree ! I started with a hawksky,then a sonic 185,then the super sky surfer (a pain to fly ) then got a Diamond 2500 which is one of the best i ever flew ! I have a edge 540 and a sbach 48" for when i want to do something stupid
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 07:56 PM
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Fla.
Joined Apr 2005
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Ron : There are a lot of powered gliders that the wing is removable, you just have to look for them. Try Tower Hobbies and look for the " Vista" for 1. I take it you need an ARF . Hobby Lobby probably has a couple also . You just need to do some checking.

You might go to a Glider forum also. I'm not doing the work for you .
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Old Jan 28, 2013, 12:12 AM
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United States, ID, Burley
Joined Mar 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Christensen View Post
From a Newbe: After working with my first plane -- a pico -- I think a powered glider would be a great 2nd plane to continue learning on. The two things I need in a powered glider are 1) a noiseless motor; and 2) the capability of removing the wings during transportation and/or storage.

The only such motorized glider I've found that would allow me to remove the wings on a regular baisis, and not harm the integrity of the wing attachments, is the Phoenix. However, 1) does anyone know if the Phoenix has a quiet motor? Noise is important to me, as it severely limits the locations where I can fly. And #2) does anyone know of another powered glider that will allow for wing removal 2-4 times a week, and allow the wings and fuselage connection to not loose their integrity after several months when connected?????

Many thanks for you time and answers.
I have the Phoenix evaluation you cannot hardly hear that motor, i mean it is extremely quite. A very light maneuverable and stable glider. It needs the clevis,s replaced or put some surgical tube over them as they are quite brittle plastic.
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Old Jan 29, 2013, 02:06 PM
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United States, TX
Joined Jun 2011
2,915 Posts
My first successful trainer was the Multiplex Easy Star also. The first modification was to install a larger rudder. I flew it as a tailfeather plane with the Speed 400 brushed motor for a long time. It taught me how to deal with the reverse control issue as the plane is coming towards you. Then I installed a more powerful outrunner with a 7x4 3-bladed pusher prop. Then I had to build a new tail for it because the original tail warped. Finally, I cut ailerons into it and was pleasantly surprised by how well it took to the ailerons. In fact, it is still one of my favorite planes to take up today.

I would recommend the Easy Star II today though, since it has the aileron option on it.
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