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Old Sep 19, 2012, 04:14 PM
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Salem, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabu32 View Post
Question about the DPS-600:

i saw there were 2 ways to connect the three pins that turn on the PS. one is pins 6-8-10 and the other is pins 6-9-10. i tried it both ways and they both work. when i have 6-8-10 connected i have an output of 12.50V but when i have pins 6-9-10 connected i have an output of 12.66V. is there any problem using the 6-9-10 connection over the 6-8-10? i heard if you have the 6-9-10 connected it causes fluctuations in voltage when connected to another PS in series.
6-8-10 is the way to go. 6-9-10 works but you're using -S instead of ground which is why the voltage goes up a bit.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...&postcount=568
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Old Sep 20, 2012, 10:07 AM
Who put that tree there?!?!
jabu32's Avatar
Indianapolis, IN
Joined Jan 2011
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Thanks.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 02:11 AM
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United States, AZ, Gilbert
Joined Jul 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusey52 View Post
There's a lot of great information on the preceding pages but the 'unknown' pins always bugged me so here's an update to what the various pins do, enjoy.


PIN .......... Ribbon Wire ....... Description
. 1 ............ N/A ...................... +5VSB
. 2 ............ N/A ...................... +5VSB
. 3 ............ N/A ...................... +5VSB
. 4 ............ 3 .......................... Fan speed, ground for minimum speed. (For variable speed use ~4.6v to Vcc.)
. 5 ............ N/A ...................... -12V
. 6 ............ 5 .......................... PsKill, ground this and PsOn to turn on the PS.
. 7 ............ 6 .......................... +S (positive sense)
. 8 ............ N/A ...................... DC ground
. 9 ............ 8 .......................... -S (negative sense)
10 ............ 4 .......................... PsOn, ground this and PsKill to turn on the PS.
11 ............ 9 .......................... Current Share
12 ............ 7 .......................... Power OK/Fault (OK = 3.8V, Fault = 0V).
N/A .......... 1 .......................... Ground from the output board back to the main board (needs to be tied to DC ground).
N/A .......... 2 .......................... Ground from the output board back to the main board (needs to be tied to DC ground).
N/A ........ 10 .......................... Ground from the output board back to the main board (not needed).

OK, so what's the deal with pins 7 & 9, pin 9 is voltage adjust, right? Well, yes and no. High end power supplies regulate voltage at the load (as opposed to at the PS). They accomplish this by monitoring the voltage at the load using two small sense wires (+S & -S). The voltage at the load is feed back to the voltage regulator so the regulator can compensate for any line loss caused by large currents flowing through the primary output wires. If the sense pins are connected as originally intended, +S to the positive output line and -S to the negative output line, the PS will run at its rated output of 12.15V at the point where +S & -S are connected. If they're left open, you'll get about 12.5V. Now since these 'sense' pins give us access to the voltage regulator circuit, we have direct control over the regulator (within limits). To raise the output voltage you pull -S up or pull +S down (or both) using an appropriate resistor. A simple way to accomplish this is to connect a resistor between +S & -S. They're actually already tied together via a resistor internally, we're just adding a parallel resistor to lower the value.

Here's a few examples of connecting +S to -S via a resistor and the resulting output voltage:

1.8K ......... 13.8V
2.1K ......... 13.6V
2.3K ......... 13.5V
2.7K ......... 13.35V
3.3K ......... 13.2V
3.9K ......... 13.1V
4.7K ......... 13.0V
10K .......... 12.7V

Note: The closer to OVP (~13.8V) you get, the more likely you are to have issues with the PS shutting down unexpectedly and/or not being able to deliver full current.
Just wondering, is there any practice way to utilize these sense pins when powering a charger? Would there be any benefit to doing so, like to provide a more stable voltage under varying loads? Would this perhaps prolong the life of the charger at all, or is there no real benefit to doing this, if it is even possible/practicle to do?
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 10:59 AM
Steven
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United States, CT, East Hartford
Joined May 2010
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Yup. You could tie the +S and -S lines directly to the load to compensate for the voltage drop in main power wires. This will stabilize the voltage seen by the Charger.

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Old Sep 22, 2012, 11:45 AM
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So. Cal.
Joined Oct 2004
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It'll maintain the same voltage at the load independent of current draw, this is for certain. Output ripple won't be affected by any significant degree. As such, a charger likely won't care at all.

The only benefit that I can see in having the sense leads at the charger input is if the output leads on the power supply are extremely long (several feet) or of small gauge and voltage drop becomes an issue. I can't personally imagine a scenario that this would be the case.

Mark
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 11:55 AM
Steven
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United States, CT, East Hartford
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Sounds good mrforsyth. Just covering all the bases.
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 02:17 PM
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Salem, Oregon
Joined Dec 2008
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I agree with Mark. There's little or no tangible benefit to connecting the sense lines at the load for the typical RC charger application. If there’s significant voltage drop at the charger it would be better to beef up the output wires than use the sense lines to compensate for the loss.

If you're interested in adjusting the output voltage above the nominal 12.5v then I recommend adding a resistor between the two sense lines. The sense lines are already tied to each other and the positive and negative rails internally though a voltage divider (xandrios posted a typical schematic in an earlier post). Adding a resistor between the sense lines keeps the circuit balanced and avoids any undesirable influence from an externally regulated source (like using +5VSB to bias -S).
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Old Sep 22, 2012, 04:18 PM
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United States, AZ, Gilbert
Joined Jul 2010
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Yeah, that makes sense (all the above). Thanks for the responses!
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 12:19 AM
Who put that tree there?!?!
jabu32's Avatar
Indianapolis, IN
Joined Jan 2011
390 Posts
I am in the process of removing the hot swap board. i wired it up and it all works. i connected 1-2 to ground post and 4-5-8 together. (on the ribbon). Do i want to connect 8 to 4 and 5. wouldnt this be like shorting 6-9-10 pins? dont i want to short 6-8-10? so i should just leave 8 not connected to anything and just short 4-5 of the ribbon????
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 02:19 PM
Registered User
Salem, Oregon
Joined Dec 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabu32 View Post
I am in the process of removing the hot swap board. i wired it up and it all works. i connected 1-2 to ground post and 4-5-8 together. (on the ribbon). Do i want to connect 8 to 4 and 5. wouldnt this be like shorting 6-9-10 pins? dont i want to short 6-8-10? so i should just leave 8 not connected to anything and just short 4-5 of the ribbon????
Look at the 'ribbon wire' column here: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...&postcount=568

When you tie ribbon wires 4-5-8 together you're using -S to sink PsOn & PsKill. The reason this works is -S is close to ground, sitting at about 0.23V. The down side is that -S is part of the regulator circuit. A better way to power up the supply is connect 1-2-4-5 all to DC ground (the negative supply post). Or, if you also want to slow the fan down, connect ribbin wires 1-2-3-4-5 all to DC ground.
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 04:24 PM
Who put that tree there?!?!
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Indianapolis, IN
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thats what i meant. just shorting 1-2-4-5 to ground and leave 8 out. i think this will be a better solution without 8.
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 07:01 PM
Use the 4S Luke
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USA, TX, Euless
Joined Aug 2003
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FWIW I see nearly a Volt drop in 2 leads (+ and -) about 3' long 10ga @50A. That's 6ft altogether. So keep your leads as short as possible.
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 07:27 PM
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Joined Oct 2004
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10 AWG = 1 Ohm/1000 ft. 6 ft = .006 Ohms. .006 x 50 = .3 volts.

This should be in the noise but agreed that it's wise to keep leads as short as practical. If one must use long leads, use heavy gauge wire. I personally use jumper cables when I need long leads as it's the cheapest heavy gauge wire that I have ever come across and it is exceptionally rugged.

Mark
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Old Sep 24, 2012, 08:48 AM
Use the 4S Luke
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USA, TX, Euless
Joined Aug 2003
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Well maybe it's my connections then. In testing power supplies for sale, I clip on to the outputs.
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Old Sep 24, 2012, 06:04 PM
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Salem, Oregon
Joined Dec 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabu32 View Post
thats what i meant. just shorting 1-2-4-5 to ground and leave 8 out. i think this will be a better solution without 8.
You got it. There's no need to connect ribbon wire 8, just insulate it unless you intend to adjust the output voltage. To increase the output voltage you would connect ribbon wire 8 to ribbon wire 6 through a suitable resistor.
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