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Old Jan 12, 2012, 02:21 PM
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Joined Jan 2012
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Super Cub LP or Fun Cub

I am a complete newcomer I have been looking at getting a 2nd plane ( I have been practicing and using a Cox SkyCruiser for several months) and I'm ready to step up to something bigger. I really like the Super Cub LP and I want to be able to fly in the winter (ski or float option) and now I have been looking at the Fun Cub which looks great too. I primarily do NOT have any runway to use around where I live so I love the big tundra wheels on the Fun Cub. Both seem docile enough for a beginner like myself but with room to grow on each. The Super Cub can be modified for ailerons and the Fun Cub already has them. Any thoughts which is better for a newbie like myself?

Thanks.
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 03:13 PM
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MyPonyRocks's Avatar
United States, NC, Goldsboro
Joined Mar 2011
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No experience with this, but maybe Super Cub with modded ailerons?
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 03:19 PM
fmw
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I do own a Fun Cub. I've never even seen the HZ super cub so I can't speak from experience there. My thoughts are these. The Fun Cub is not a great flyer. It is hard to balance and seems to want to fight the person controlling it. It is competent at best and, yes, it has big wheels. You can put big wheels on anything.

The HZ super cub is RTF and, like most RTF's is loaded with cheap equipment. I have no idea how it flies but a lot people on this forum seem happy with them. I don't buy RTF's as a matter of choice and the Super Cub was never an option for me when I started.

The best trainer I've ever flown is the Eflite Apprentice. The motor is not that good (true of all Parkzone models as well) but is competent and powerful and the rest of the hardware is better than that found on most RTF's. It isn't cheap. It is over $200 without radio, battery and charger but probably worth it. It is big and also has ailerons. It has plenty of power to do anything a novice should do with a model airplane. After the novice stage, you can still enjoy flying the Apprentice because it is a terrific flyer. Mine now has floats on it.

If you like the Multiplex type of model, then they have a terrific trainer called the Mentor. Our club uses it to train novices and I've flown it. It flies quite a bit better than the Fun Cub. It is a little smaller and less powerful than the Apprentice but is an excellent trainer, like the Apprentice. Both of these planes would require you to have your own radio, just like the Fun Cub. You should have your own radio. I don't recomment spending money on RTF's. This is all opinion, not universal truths. Many people disagree with me.
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 05:04 PM
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United States, VA, Richmond
Joined Dec 2011
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Many thousands of experienced and beginner flyers love their Super Cub so I don't think you can go wrong there.

I'm a beginner as well and the HZ Super Cub LP was my first plane. It's been a fun plane to learn on and I'm looking forward to all of the modding possibilities and making use of the wealth of information out there provided by the Super Cub community.
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 05:23 PM
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flydiver's Avatar
United States, WA, Seattle
Joined Jan 2007
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The FunCub is essentially a larger, somewhat upgraded Super Cub that is designed and made better. Since the first thing almost anyone does with the SC is gut it and totally rebuild it why not start with a better chunk of foam and work your goals from there?
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 11:54 PM
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United States, OR, Canby
Joined Aug 2011
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I bought a used FunCub and love it! And it has flaps which I have set for 40 degress. I think it flies good. A friend of mine has a big 8 ft. Telemaster trainer which usually comes home in a bag but i let him fly AND land the FunCub and it's still in one piece
A little video, ignore the time stamp.

FunCub at CCS.avi (4 min 25 sec)
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Old Jan 13, 2012, 12:13 AM
2 Fast 2 Low & 2 Loud
scootrb4's Avatar
United States, CA, Winchester
Joined Nov 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flydiver View Post
The FunCub is essentially a larger, somewhat upgraded Super Cub that is designed and made better. Since the first thing almost anyone does with the SC is gut it and totally rebuild it why not start with a better chunk of foam and work your goals from there?
I agree, If you have had a lot of sim time and If you think you can handle it, get a 4 ch plane with ailerons.
Most people will argue that learning to fly a 3 ch plane is a necessary first step.
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Old Jan 13, 2012, 03:03 AM
Low'n Slow is safest, right?
KaiWE's Avatar
Norge, ōstfold, Fredrikstad
Joined Jun 2011
553 Posts
If the budget allows it, an option cold be to buy a FunCub and an EasyCub spare wing (The FunCub and EasyCub has basically the same fuselage).
Then you can start out flying it as a 3ch with the EasyCub wing and just swap to the FunCub wing with ailerons and flaps when you want to go 5ch...

I have both the FunCub and the SuperCub LP (with one original wing and one modded with aileron/flaps and the dihedral taken out + brushless conversion and bigger wheels), and I must say that I prefer the FunCub over the SuperCub LP. The springy undercarriage and big wheels on the FunCub together with 90 degree flaps makes it the ultimate "bushplane" - you can take off and land in an incredible short distance in the roughest terrain. And with the flap at 40 degrees, you can fly really slow in a remarkably small area - considering that this is a relatively large plane with 1400mm wingspan. It is also one of the least CG-critical plane I have - it behaves nice wherever I put the battery (flying with 2200 to 2600mah 3C)

The SuperCub LP gets its most airtime when one of my flying buddies is temorarely out of planes The reason why I kept it after getting the FunCub is that I intend to use it for my first attempt with floats...

Greetings from Norway,
Kai W-E
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Old Jan 13, 2012, 10:26 AM
More Altitude, Less Attitude!
chickenwing's Avatar
United States, SC, Ninety Six
Joined Mar 2008
547 Posts
I own both, and the FunCub would be my pick. The SuperCub is a fantastic airframe and would also be a good choice, but as you progress, you will eventually turn it into something that more or less resembles a FunCub anyway. I started out with an old school SuperCub. Brushed motor, crap radio, and crap electronics. After wasting way too much money replacing failed equipment, I bought a proper radio and replaced all of the electronics. Now it was flying right. When I was ready to move up, I built a SuperCub from parts with a powerful brushless motor, lipo battery, and larger wheels. Later, I added ailerons to the wing. Later, I added flaps to the wing. It is now functionally identical to a FunCub.

My wife gave me a FunCub for my birthday last year. Out of the box, it was designed to do everything I wanted the SuperCub to do. For me, it is an excellent flyer. I installed an E-flite Power 10 motor, 40A speed control with switch mode BEC, APC 12 x 6E prop, and Hitec servos. Expensive, but well worth it for me. Over 400W of power for a 2 pound model is ridiculous… but so much fun! It can be airborne in less than three feet and make a nearly vertical climb. It can take off or land on any surface. It can poke along at the pace of a brisk jog or shred the sky with insane aerobatics. It loves calm air but can handle moderate winds without noticing. It’s the total package in a high wing trainer and beyond, but there are some trade-offs you need to consider.

1. The FunCub is a kit. Only the airframe and hardware come in the box. Some building will be necessary.
2. You will have to select, buy, and install all electronics. Motor, ESC, rudder servo, elevator servo, aileron and flap servos for the right and left wing halves, tow release servo (optional), servo lead extensions and y-connectors. Because of the number of servos used, an ESC with a linear BEC should not be selected. You will need one with a switching BEC, or a separate UBEC to power the receiver and servos. If you (and you should) install flaps, you will need a reversing y-connector or you will need to modify the provided servo pocket for reverse mounting.
3. Some rigidity may need to be added to the motor mounting supports to handle vibration issues, depending on how much power or speed you want.
4. You really should have a 6-channel minimum receiver and radio with channel mixing capabilities.
5. You really need to have a proper balancing charger and quality lipo batteries with connectors that match the one on your ESC.
6. I’m sure there are other details I have left out.

While, I can wholeheartedly recommend the FunCub, this would have completely overwhelmed me from a cost and technical standpoint as a beginner. If you already have a proper radio, a proper charger, and a proper budget, by all means get the FunCub. If not, there are other equally good options. The SuperCub, in my opinion, would be an excellent choice.

The Hobbyzone SuperCub DSM RTF is about $200 and comes with everything you need to fly. You will eventually want a better radio and charger. Personally, I would pass on the RTF and invest in better equipment. Still, if this is all your budget will allow, it’s not a wrong choice.

The Hobbyzone SuperCub LP BNF is about $170 and comes with everything you will need, less the Spektrum radio. Add a DX5e for $60 or a DX6i for $160. Both are fine entry level radios, but I would highly recommend the DX6i because of the multiple model memory and channel mixing capabilities. For $230 or $330 you now have a setup that will allow you to advance to the next level when you are ready. You will eventually want a better charger.

Another option already suggested would be the E-flite Apprentice RTF for about $300. Everything you will need to fly is in the box including a Spektrum DX5e transmitter. It’s a bigger airframe than the SuperCub and has ailerons. By all reports, it’s also a great flyer. You will eventually want a better charger.

Of the options listed above, and knowing what I know now (thinking beyond the SuperCub to more advanced models), I would go for the BNF SuperCub and the Spektrum DX6i radio. Just my opinion.

Me flying my modified SuperCub...
20110611 - Flapped SuperCub (4 min 58 sec)


Me flying my FunCub...
20110528 - Maidening the Multiplex Fun Cub (1 min 45 sec)
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Last edited by chickenwing; Jan 13, 2012 at 09:03 PM. Reason: *APC
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Old Jan 13, 2012, 10:54 AM
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United States, FL, Kissimmee
Joined Feb 2011
113 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenwing View Post
I own both, and the FunCub would be my pick. The SuperCub is a fantastic airframe and would also be a good choice, but as you progress, you will eventually turn it into something that more or less resembles a FunCub anyway. I started out with an old school SuperCub. Brushed motor, crap radio, and crap electronics. After wasting way too much money replacing failed equipment, I bought a proper radio and replaced all of the electronics. Now it was flying right. When I was ready to move up, I built a SuperCub from parts with a powerful brushless motor, lipo battery, and larger wheels. Later, I added ailerons to the wing. Later, I added flaps to the wing. It is now functionally identical to a FunCub.

My wife gave me a FunCub for my birthday last year. Out of the box, it was designed to do everything I wanted the SuperCub to do. For me, it is an excellent flyer. I installed an E-flite Power 10 motor, 40A speed control with switch mode BEC, APX 12 x 6E prop, and Hitec servos. Expensive, but well worth it for me. Over 400W of power for a 2 pound model is ridiculousÖ but so much fun! It can be airborne in less than three feet and make a nearly vertical climb. It can take off or land on any surface. It can poke along at the pace of a brisk jog or shred the sky with insane aerobatics. It loves calm air but can handle moderate winds without noticing. Itís the total package in a high wing trainer and beyond, but there are some trade-offs you need to consider.

1. The FunCub is a kit. Only the airframe and hardware come in the box. Some building will be necessary.
2. You will have to select, buy, and install all electronics. Motor, ESC, rudder servo, elevator servo, aileron and flap servos for the right and left wing halves, tow release servo (optional), servo lead extensions and y-connectors. Because of the number of servos used, an ESC with a linear BEC should not be selected. You will need one with a switching BEC, or a separate linear BEC to power the receiver and servos. If you (and you should) install flaps, you will need a reversing y-connector or you will need to modify the provided servo pocket for reverse mounting.
3. Some rigidity may need to be added to the motor mounting supports to handle vibration issues, depending on how much power or speed you want.
4. You really should have a 6-channel minimum receiver and radio with channel mixing capabilities.
5. You really need to have a proper balancing charger and quality lipo batteries with connectors that match the one on your ESC.
6. Iím sure there are other details I have left out.

While, I can wholeheartedly recommend the FunCub, this would have completely overwhelmed me from a cost and technical standpoint as a beginner. If you already have a proper radio, a proper charger, and a proper budget, by all means get the FunCub. If not, there are other equally good options. The SuperCub, in my opinion, would be an excellent choice.

The Hobbyzone SuperCub DSM RTF is about $200 and comes with everything you need to fly. You will eventually want a better radio and charger. Personally, I would pass on the RTF and invest in better equipment. Still, if this is all your budget will allow, itís not a wrong choice.

The Hobbyzone SuperCub LP BNF is about $170 and comes with everything you will need, less the Spektrum radio. Add a DX5e for $60 or a DX6i for $160. Both are fine entry level radios, but I would highly recommend the DX6i because of the multiple model memory and channel mixing capabilities. For $230 or $330 you now have a setup that will allow you to advance to the next level when you are ready. You will eventually want a better charger.

Another option already suggested would be the E-flite Apprentice RTF for about $300. Everything you will need to fly is in the box including a Spektrum DX5e transmitter. Itís a bigger airframe than the SuperCub and has ailerons. By all reports, itís also a great flyer. You will eventually want a better charger.

Of the options listed above, and knowing what I know now (thinking beyond the SuperCub to more advanced models), I would go for the BNF SuperCub and the Spektrum DX6i radio. Just my opinion.

Me flying my modified SuperCub...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AwpP1mxuwg

Me flying my FunCub...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ip0Cq3BVkKI
Thanks for your opinion. I have a buddy who is interested in the hobby and I'm trying to get some knowledge.
Ken
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Old Jan 13, 2012, 09:07 PM
More Altitude, Less Attitude!
chickenwing's Avatar
United States, SC, Ninety Six
Joined Mar 2008
547 Posts
One last piece of advice... get an extra battery or two. You'll be glad you did!
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Old Apr 16, 2012, 12:38 PM
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United States, PA, Middletown
Joined Sep 2011
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chickenwing, thanks for that great post! I'm a newbie, been flying a night vapor and champ in my backyard. Yesterday I went to the local RC field and was blown away by the planes and expert flyers. I decided on the Fun Cub because of the ailerons and flaps.

I also like that it requires assembly. That way I know how to fix it after a crash!

I also like that I need to chose the electronics. This will give me a good understanding of how these planes work!

Just got back from the local hobby shop, they'll have one on Thursday. Flight training at the club starts in two weeks! I'm so excited!!!!
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Old Apr 16, 2012, 01:17 PM
More Altitude, Less Attitude!
chickenwing's Avatar
United States, SC, Ninety Six
Joined Mar 2008
547 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by wayfaringdreamer View Post
chickenwing, thanks for that great post! I'm a newbie, been flying a night vapor and champ in my backyard. Yesterday I went to the local RC field and was blown away by the planes and expert flyers. I decided on the Fun Cub because of the ailerons and flaps.

I also like that it requires assembly. That way I know how to fix it after a crash!

I also like that I need to chose the electronics. This will give me a good understanding of how these planes work!

Just got back from the local hobby shop, they'll have one on Thursday. Flight training at the club starts in two weeks! I'm so excited!!!!
You won't be disappointed! It really can be a slow and gentle flier, especially with half flaps deployed. I handed my radio to a friend who had only limited success flying a three-channel plane, and he had no problems handling the FunCub. He even rolled it about 60 feet above the ground and leveled it out again. Didn't tell me he was going to do it! About gave me a heart attack! Good luck with your Cub!
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Old Apr 16, 2012, 02:29 PM
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United States, PA, Middletown
Joined Sep 2011
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Thanks!
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Old Jul 16, 2012, 11:46 PM
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Matt D.'s Avatar
Greensboro, NC
Joined Jul 2002
780 Posts
chickenwing,
Which do you think slows down more with the flaps - Fun Cub or Super Cub?

What did you use for the flap hinges on the super cub? I couldn't tell from the video.
Thanks,
Matt
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