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Top Flite Gold Edition F4U Corsair .60 ARF - Review

Chris Mulcahy reviews the new Top Flite 60 size Corsair ARF.

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Introduction


Wingspan:62.5" (1590mm)
Wing Area:699 inē (45.1 dmē)
Wing Loading:28-31 oz/ftē (85-95 g/dmē)
Weight:8.5-9.5 lb (3.85-4.3 kg)
Length:50.5" (1285mm)
Servos:6x Futaba S9001, 1x S3003, 1x S3004
Transmitter:Futaba 8FGS
Receiver:Futaba R617FS
Battery:Hyperion 2S 1450mAh LiFe
Engine:O.S. .65AX ABL
Muffler:O.S. E4050 In Cowl Muffler
Manufacturer:Top Flite
Available From:Hobby Retailers
Price:$399.99

Top Flite have long been known for their excellent quality kits, and in recent years they have started to turn some of those kits into pre assembled "Almost Ready to Fly" models. The latest in this line is their 60 size F4U Corsair, which in kit form was already a very popular model. Now, a person with minimal building experience can have a great looking model of the Corsair, that truly does fly as good as it looks!

The Vought F4U Corsair

The Vought F4U Corsair was developed at the request of the Navy in 1938, with the first flight taking place in 1940. Demand for this carrier capable aircraft overwhelmed Vought, who had to pass on some of the production to Goodyear and Brewster. Seeing action during World War II, and the Korean War, about 12,571 Corsairs were built, setting the record for the longest production run of any piston aircraft in US history. There were sixteen different models in all, and the distinctive gull wing was designed to raise the fuselage up so that the giant prop had plenty of ground clearance! The Navy claimed an 11:1 kill ratio with the Corsair, and as well as being an excellent fighter the Corsair was also a very capable fighter-bomber.

Kit Contents



The box arrived in a sturdy outer carton, with no visible shipping damage. All of the parts were sealed in their own protective polybag, and all of the components were taped together to prevent movement during shipping. The tail feathers and wing panels were stacked in the top half of the box, and fuselage and other miscellaneous parts were packed into the lower half of the box.



After removing all of the packaging I was able to take a good look at the parts. The parts appeared solid and well built, and the covering job was excellent. The flat finish Monokote looks great, and really improves the appearance over the traditional glossy warbird ARF's. The pre painted cowl didn't have a single flaw, and the fiberglass belly pan and tail cover both had great paint jobs as well. The blue paint wasn't an exact match for the Monokote, but it was extremely close. All of the control surfaces on the wing panels are pre hinged, with C/A hinges on the ailerons, and Robart style pin hinges for the flaps. One of the ailerons hadn't been lined up correctly, but it was a quick fix were I simply cut through the old hinges and installed some new ones. This is one of the reasons I prefer to do all the hinging myself. That being said, the complex flaps were already hinged, and this saves the modeler a lot of work!
In The Box
The kit comes with a lot of nice scale accessories. As well as the kit itself, you also get a basic pre painted cockpit that you could really detail out. A dummy radial is included, with a little assembly and trimming required. The foam wheels that are included are a nice addition, and light weight, although not entirely scale looking with the plain flat hub covers. Hardware includes all of the pushrods and clevises, fixed landing gear (if you decide not to do retracts), engine mount, fuel tank, aluminum prop hub, and all of the screws, nuts, and bolts you need to assemble the aircraft.




Required For Completion
There are several items you need to get this kit in the air. The first item is an engine. The model is designed for a .61 two stroke or .91 four stroke glow engine. The engine for this review model will be an O.S. .65AX. If I were to use the stock muffler, I would have to use a muffler extension, but as it was I chose to use the O.S. in cowl muffler for a cleaner, more scale look. I'll be using the Robart pneumatic retracts, which were designed for the kit version of this model and will also work perfectly in the ARF version, and the ARF already has a location built into the fuselage for the air tank. I'm using my Futaba 8FGS to fly the Corsair, so a Futaba R617FS receiver will be used. Using a y-harness I will have enough channels for everything I need. I'm using the recommended servos for the flying surfaces, which are the Futaba S9001 servo, and two standard Futaba servos for the throttle and to activate the retracts (S3003, S3004). I also picked up a 12v bicycle pump with a built in gauge from Harbor Freight Tools for about $8. I rigged it with an old 3 cell lipo to give me portable air filling power for the retracts out at the field. A spare Hyperion 2S 1450mAh LiFe battery will be used to power the electronics. There are also various servo extensions and miscellaneous building supplies that were needed, but nothing that the average modeler won't already have in his/her shop.




Assembly

Assembly began with reviewing the instruction manual first, which is very detailed with plenty of photos to guide you through the process. I then proceeded to go over all of the components with a heating iron, to tighten up the covering and remove any wrinkles. I took a little extra time to do this, but I knew from past experience that it would take a couple of more times with the heating iron to smooth the covering out after sitting outside all day.

Wing






Following the instructions, I started with the wing. I glued the two dowels in to the leading edge, and attached the wing to the fuselage. I then popped the fuselage upside down on a work stand. The covering where the belly pan gets glued to had already been removed, so that was one less thing for me to do! The belly pan received a little scuffing up with some sand paper before being epoxied to the wing (while the wing is bolted to the fuselage). This is good time to check out the wing while you are working on it. The wheel wells have been finished nicely with some fiberglass inserts, and string has been run through all the servo hatches to aid in guiding servo wires. The flaps are joined together with a wedge of material that reminded me of the circuit board material. The next thing to cross off the list was to attach the air intakes to the wing leading edge. A little cutting and some trial and error fitting are required to get a good fit. I was a little nervous about using C/A to glue them in place per the manual, as C/A can run away from you very easily and make a mess. I chose instead to use "goop" glue. I used masking tape to hold the intakes in place while the glue dried.




I then moved on to the retracts. Running the airline through the wing was a little tricky, but I eventually pulled the lines through all of the correct holes in the wing. I lined the retracts up as far forward on the mounts as I could get them, and predrilled the mounts before driving in the screws. I measured and then cut down the struts on the retracts, and attached the wheel collars and wheels. I substituted the wheels for the more scale looking robart rubber wheels, and while they are a little heavier I do like the look of them a lot better. Something I realized was that unless I was willing to start cutting into the bottom of the center wing section, I couldn't use oleo style "springy" retracts, as there was no accommodation for them.







Next up was the outer wing panels. The wing panels have a doubled up joiner to connect the outer panel to the center section. The joiner halves were glued together with epoxy, and while they were drying I inspected the wing roots. On one side of the center wing section were two small holes, fore and aft, on the exposed rib. This was meant for inserting some plastic guide pins to aid assembly. Unfortunately they hadn't been drilled on the other side of the center section. This was not a big issue, I just had to take a little extra care in making sure everything was straight when I epoxied the outer panels to the center section. I had to make sure that the flap tab was lined up correctly with the inboard flap when attaching the wing. With a generous amount of epoxy covering the entire exposed area of the ribs, I glued the wing panels to the center wing. I used a rag with denatured alcohol to clean up any mess, and used some tape with a couple of clamps to hold everything in place while the glue dried. At this point I glued the hard points to all of the servo doors, and set them aside to dry also.





There are a lot of little things that I did, which I won't go into detail here, suffice it to say that the manual spells out everything required for assembly in detail. These were just things such as making pushrods, installing servos, and grinding flat spots for the wheel axles. It was all straight forward, and I didn't encounter any issues during the final assembly of the wing.

Fuselage








I found the use of an airplane work stand extremely helpful during assembly. The tail surfaces were the first to be assembled to the fuse. The elevator and rudder have a cool linkage system that is hidden inside the fuselage. The slots for all the hinges are pre cut, so it was just a matter of inserting the hinges, and gluing in the torque rods. The rudder was installed first, and the pushrods run through the fuselage and attached to the rudder torque rod and tail wheel on the underside of the fuse at the back. The fiberglass cover makes it very easy to work in this area of the aircraft, and it also means that maintenance will be very easy.




I held off on gluing the rudder in place until I had the horizontal stabilizer installed. Included are a couple of plywood jigs, that are tack glued to the inside of the wing saddle. This allows you to mount a straight edge ruler to use as a guide for leveling the horizontal stab. Using this guide, you can sight down the fuselage to see if your h-stab is level with the straight edge. As it turned out, mine did not require any modifying. I then used a t-pin at the front of the fuselage, and some high tech string to measure the distance between the two sides of the h-stab, and after much measuring and adjusting, I prepared and glued the h-stab in place with 30 minute epoxy. Once I had cleaned up the glue, I double checked that everything was square and straight, and then used the access hatch on the bottom of the fuse to apply a good fillet of epoxy to the bottom of the h-stab on the inside. I must have checked the stab measurements about a dozen times while the glue was drying, just to be on the safe side!




Once the glue had dried, I moved on to gluing the elevator and rudder in place. Both use a torque rod, so I protected the stabilizers with a little tape, so as not to accidentally get epoxy on them during thpe gluing process. After applying epoxy to the torque rods, I installed the control surfaces with the C/A hinges, applying some thin C/A along the way. I then went back with the denatured alcohol rag and cleaned up any excess epoxy. I finished up the pushrod installation, making sure to use thread lock on all of the metal to metal screws, and moved on to installing the access cover.







The tail access cover required gluing hard points in for the screws that hold it in place. I measured everything twice before drilling, and proceeded to drill the holes for the screws. The screws that come with the kit are Phillips head screws, but I had some spare button head screws that require an Allen wrench so I decided to go with them instead as they are low profile.

I installed the air canister for the retracts next. A location is already cut out of the formers under the turtle deck, so it was just a case of gluing the can in place. With the help of a friend, we applied a bead of "goop" around the can and slotted it in place. It definitely helps to have a second set of hands for this process!




The motor mount needs to be drilled and tapped to accept your motor. I measured and marked the locations for the engine bolts, and carefully drilled and then tapped the holes to accept the 8-32 screws that come with the kit. The mount is adjustable in width, so can be used for either engine options. There is a firewall template in the back of the instruction manual, which can be cut out and lined up with the etched lines on the firewall. As well as having an etched cross hair on the firewall, which indicates the center, there is also a circle to aid in engine orientation. As luck would have it, my engine was mounted at a 45 degree angle so that the muffler would point out of the bottom of the cowl. The O.S. muffler is so compact, that only the very end of the stinger will be visible.






Using the in cowl muffler made the throttle pushrod installation a little more perplexing. After a couple of attempts, and after calling in a friend to take a look, we finally came up with just the right amount of bends in the pushrod to make it around the muffler.



The cowl installation was straightforward, with paper templates used to locate the holes. The dummy radial was trimmed, and the "pushrods" were glued in place on the face of each faux cylinder head. Once again I used "goop" as the adhesive of choice, gluing the dummy radial in place. The instructions make reference to wood spacers to be glued in to the cowl, but they were actually plastic (a tech bulletin has been posted). I also grabbed some bonded sealing washers to use with the screws that hold the cowl in place. These washers are great as they eliminate vibration to the cowl, and you will never have elongated holes again.





The prop used is a Master Airscrew "K" Series 13x6, and the prop hub was included in the kit. There was also a torque bar included specifically for the prop hub!


Final Assembly

With all of the major components completed, I moved on to the finishing touches. The cockpit kit was glued in placing use, you guessed it, "goop"! I then taped the canopy in place and drilled four holes for the retaining screws. I carefully applied thin C/A glue to the drilled holes before attaching the canopy. The servos were all installed per the manual, with no problems encountered. I plumbed the fuel tank and installed it as recommended in the manual. The kit provides a mounting option for the retract actuator valve, which is basically a plywood platform. I soaked the platform in thin C/A to stiffen it up, as it flexed when used. The receiver and battery were installed, and this pretty much finished off the model. All that was left was to set the control throws, which was achieved very quickly with the aid of a straight edge ruler.





A Few Bumps in the Road

At this point I did run into a couple of small snags. The first one being a problem with the retracts. For some reason I just could not get them to extend correctly. After much head scratching I discovered that the rails that the retracts mount to were not square. They tapered off toward the front of the wing, causing the retract mechanism to bend, which caused binding. I had to glue a wedge shaped piece of plywood to level out the rails, and after that the retracts worked the way they should.


Another issue raised its head when I tried to balance the plane. It was considerably tail heavy. I figured out that I needed to add about 12 ounces as far forward as I could. My friend suggested mounting it under the motor mount, so I made a box big enough to hold the weight and screwed it to the bottom of the motor mount. The model then balanced perfectly, and ended up weighing in at 9 lbs 11oz.



Flying

First Day Out




Before I even got to the flying field, I ran and tuned the engine in my driveway so as to avoid any unwanted surprises. I ran three tanks of gas through the engine, and had the engine tuned nicely. I calculated that at full throttle I had a ten minute run time, so I set up a timer for about eight minutes. The cold days gave us a break, and we received an unseasonably warm day with very little wind. I packed up the Corsair and headed to the flying field. At the field I charged up the air tank with my $8 lipo powered bicycle bump, and I was good to go. With the range test completed, and ground checks finished, I was ready to fire her up. The motor started without any problems, and I set the model off toward the runway. I immediately noticed how well it handles on the ground, that tail wheel really steers with authority! After a few taxi tests, I pointed the nose into the wind and opened up the throttle. Almost as soon as the Corsair started rolling the tail lifted off and leveled out, reminding me of a Cub on takeoff. I continued the roll out and eased it up into the air, and off I went!



The O.S. .65AX pulled the Corsair around with authority, and my worries about the extra weight added disappeared. The Corsair felt light and fast, and cut through the air like a hot knife through butter. The in cowl muffler has a great sound, much more throaty and pretty quiet. The first flight was uneventful, with lots of high speed passes, and some very scale looking rolls (it had just the right roll rate). I've never owned an airplane with retracts, and I discovered that pneumatics will not lower when the plane is at full throttle! I slowed the Corsair down and was relieved to see the gear lower into place. I performed a few slow passes and set up for final approach. I lowered the flaps as I lined it up to the runway, and flew it down to a few feet off the ground. I then throttled back and let it bleed off speed, and the Corsair settled in nicely with a beautiful tail up roll out before finally coming to a stop. I couldn't have asked for a better maiden!

The second flight was much the same, except it ended abruptly when about three quarters through the flight the engine unexpectedly quit. I wasn't very high, and was heading upwind on the far side of the runway. I immediately lowered the gear, and started a large sweeping turn 180 degrees to a downwind leg over the runway. To my surprise the Corsair performed well as a glider, and I touched down safely on the runway without a single bounce. We started it back up, and tested the engine. Without any obvious cause for the dead stick, we ran the engine up and down, held the airplane vertically, and did all those other tricks we have all learned to see if the engine is running correctly. I decided to try another flight, and no sooner had I taken off and turned downwind, the engine quit again resulting in another abrupt dead stick landing. This time I decided to call it a day and have a much closer look once I got it home.
What I discovered, was air in the fuel lines. I took another look at the hard mounted fuel tank, and guessed that vibration was causing the fuel to froth, resulting in air in the lines. I took the fuel tank out, and cut away a small amount of wood around the fuel tank bay so that I could pad it with 1/2" foam. I then installed the tank and got the Corsair ready for another trip out.

Second Day Out

The next trip out saw all my previous engine problems disappear, and I had a great day of Flying with the Corsair. Now that I had confidence in the engine again, I was able to enjoy what the Corsair had to offer. As the engine started breaking in a little more, I could just start to hear the prop rip on some fast passes, and boy were they fast. This particular day it was pretty gusty out, and the short fuselage of the Corsair resulted in it being buffeted about quite a bit, however it powered through even the strongest head wind. It rolls the same in either direction, and that distinctive gull wing made for an awesome silhouette in the sky. Speaking of the sky, it was bright and blue, and the Corsair was blue, and I guess the point of the blue scheme on the full scale Corsair was to camouflage it in the sky. Well, it works for the model Corsair too! As I would send the plane out away from me, there were brief moments when it seemed to disappear! The Corsairs performance reminded me of any number of good aerobatic sport planes. It could be slowed down nicely for landing, without any signs of tip stalling, and seemed to be a very forgiving airframe. There was a lot of power going vertical, but it wasn't unlimited. I was able to perform nice large, round loops, and the rudder did an excellent job of keeping it on track when correcting for the wind. I had a lot of fun with the landings, flaps and wheels down and gently kissing the ground with the wheels without any bounce and then rolling out. Being new to warbirds, I was surprised at how pleasing it was to get a really good scale looking landing!

Is This For a Beginner?

This is not for beginners, it is a high performance scale plane with a lot of setting up required to get it to perform correctly. If you've already learned how to fly a tail dragger, and are ready to move up to warbird, then this could be for you!

Flight Video/Photo Gallery














Youtube Link

Conclusion

The Corsair is a quality ARF, built from a pedigree kit that has pleased modelers for years. For someone looking to try out warbirds, it offers a quick way of getting a good model airborne. For the more adventurous, it offers a great building block to really detail out your own unique Corsair. For me, I'll continue to have a lot of fun flying the Corsair just the way it is. It's a great looking model that flies extremely well, and is a good representation of its full scale counterpart!

Pros
Great looking scale model
Well built
Retract Ready
Flaps
Awesome flight characteristics
Cons
Control surfaces needed a little correction
Retract rails not square

Last edited by Angela H; Mar 06, 2012 at 09:42 AM..

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Old Mar 06, 2012, 10:50 AM
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Michael Heer's Avatar
Stockton, Ca. USA
Joined Apr 2001
9,417 Posts
Hi Chris:
Any recommendations on how you would convert this plane from Power to Electric? Mike Heer
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 10:57 AM
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CSpaced's Avatar
Oak Ridge, NC
Joined Jun 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Heer View Post
Hi Chris:
Any recommendations on how you would convert this plane from Power to Electric? Mike Heer
Hi Mike,

There is a lot of good info on converting the Kit version of the Corsair to electric power here:
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1386399

I don't see why this couldn't be applied to the ARF version as well.
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 11:29 AM
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Stockton, Ca. USA
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Thanks Chris! Mike
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 02:21 PM
That's so classic you.
Generic Member's Avatar
United States, NC, Stokesdale
Joined Jul 2006
347 Posts
This is great! An OS 1.20 Four stroke or DLE 20 will require no additonal weight!
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 06:34 PM
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United States, NJ, Phillipsburg
Joined Mar 2012
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I opted to use the OS.95V four stroke (small hole for exhaust) and E-flite .46 size Elect. retracts with Robart robostruts and Robart 3 1/2" Wheels. Had to add approx 6 oz of nose weight to balance. Waiting on good weather to maiden. I don't have a scale to weigh the plane.

Tom
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Old Mar 08, 2012, 05:30 AM
Dr. Dave
USA
Joined Nov 2005
1,316 Posts
Nice, stuff Chris. I have this as the old version and I am ready to cover it after about ten years. Nice to read your comments and suggestions.
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Old Mar 11, 2012, 12:57 PM
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turnale's Avatar
United States, TX, Houston
Joined May 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iflircaircraft View Post
I opted to use the OS.95V four stroke (small hole for exhaust) and E-flite .46 size Elect. retracts with Robart robostruts and Robart 3 1/2" Wheels. Had to add approx 6 oz of nose weight to balance. Waiting on good weather to maiden. I don't have a scale to weigh the plane.

Tom
Hi Tom,

i have mounted the .46 electric retracts from Eflite on my .50 kyosho corsair F4U (an old discontinued kit), and they work great. Easy to install, and very robust... when fully deployed.
Something to know is that the retract cannot take any load when they are transitioning from open to close, and vice versa. I mistakenly retracted the landing gear when the plane was on the floor, static. That snaps the worm gear out of their place. It is repairable though, but it takes a good 1h per retracts, and some patience...
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Old Mar 11, 2012, 01:07 PM
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turnale's Avatar
United States, TX, Houston
Joined May 2006
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Oh and I forgot:

Great review! I like the video edit, which is dynamic, entertaining and shows the plane in various situation. Well done on the music as well: good mix between vintage music and engine roar

and... I wish they had a more agressive painting, such as the infamous yellow cowl
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Old Mar 14, 2012, 10:07 AM
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United States, MI, East Tawas
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why would you not use nicer hinges?
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Old Mar 14, 2012, 11:05 AM
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Oak Ridge, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hurleycycle View Post
why would you not use nicer hinges?
Which hinges are you referring to?

As it stands, I used the hinges that were included with the ARF, which function just fine.
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Old Mar 14, 2012, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSpaced View Post
Hi Mike,

There is a lot of good info on converting the Kit version of the Corsair to electric power here:
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1386399

I don't see why this couldn't be applied to the ARF version as well.
Awesome to see you referenced my build thread for the electric conversion setup!!! Truly enjoyed the review on the corsair.

Is it possible you can give us a full weight of this arf build? Would like to see exactly what your weight is with all the accessories installed. I also have a slight wing Incidence issue. I have heard a roumor that the arf has a different incidence angle compared to the kit. Any possibly way you can also verify this for us ?
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Old Mar 14, 2012, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolffcub View Post
Awesome to see you referenced my build thread for the electric conversion setup!!! Truly enjoyed the review on the corsair.

Is it possible you can give us a full weight of this arf build? Would like to see exactly what your weight is with all the accessories installed. I also have a slight wing Incidence issue. I have heard a roumor that the arf has a different incidence angle compared to the kit. Any possibly way you can also verify this for us ?
Glad you enjoyed the review, as mentioned the model came in at 9lbs 11oz.

I will look into the incidence question and get back to you.
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Old Mar 14, 2012, 01:20 PM
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Sorry my bad fit missing the posted weight. Mine came in heavy next to yours.
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Old Mar 14, 2012, 01:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolffcub View Post
Sorry my bad fit missing the posted weight. Mine came in heavy next to yours.
What did yours come in at?
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