HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale

Flyzone Cessna Corvalis 350 Select Scale RTF Review

Produced in Aerocell foam, the newest version of the Cessna Corvalis 350 is a ready-to-fly RC airplane. Fully Park Pilot Program legal the Corvalis is an elegant aircraft with working flaps and an installed 2.4 GHz. Tactic TTX 600 radio.

Splash

Introduction


Wingspan:57in. / 1450mm
Wing Area:362 sq. in. / 23.3 dm. sq.
Weight:2.25 lb. / 1020g
Length:38in. / 965mm
Wing Loading:14 oz./sq. ft. / 43 g/sq. dm.
Servos:4 micro
Transmitter:Tactic TTX600 2.4 GHz
Receiver:6 channel Tactic
Battery:1800 mAh 11.1v 15C LiPo
Motor:Brushless outrunner
ESC:30 amp
Composition:Aerocell Foam
Wheels:1.5in. / 38.1mm
Prop:9 x 5
Typical Flight Duration:10 minutes +
Manufacturer:Flyzone
Available From:Your Local Hobby Shop or Tower Hobbies
Price:$279.99 (RTF) $179.99 (RxR)

The Cessna 350 Corvalis (yes, with one "L") was introduced in 2009 after Cessna purchased Lancair. Originally designed by Lancair as the Columbia 300 and then the Columbia 350, the name Corvalis comes from the name of the community west of Bend, Oregon, the original production location of the Cessna 350. The cowling of Corvalis is reminiscent of the Lancair with the two round cooling ports up front.

Flyzone’s Select Scale RTF version of the Corvalis is an exceptional rendition in not only looks, but also flying qualities. The Flyzone Corvalis is constructed of proprietary Aerocell foam, and the molding is outstanding, right down to the door handles, hinges and wing cuffs. Decals are applied so in about an hour your Corvalis RTF is indeed ready to fly. Included in the package are a Tactic TTX600 6-channel transmitter and receiver, plus a charger and 1800 mAh LiPo battery. This is indeed an excellent product offered as well in a receiver ready version.

Kit Contents

Tactic TTX600 2.4 GHz

A few months ago I reviewed the Tactic TTX600, so check that link for more details. This is a high quality FHSS Spread Spectrum radio with Secure Link Technology, dual rates, digital trims, analog throttle trim, servo reversing, one proportional dial for flaps, one non-proportional on/off, LED power indicator, built in charge jack, and a trainer system. The TTX600 weighs in at about 5.2 ounces (602g). The Corvalis is also available in a receiver ready version. Here is a link to the TTX600 manual.

Includes

  • Flyzone RTR Cessna 350 Corvalis
  • Aerocell foam with pre-installed decals
  • Two piece wing
  • LED Navigation lights, strobe and landing light
  • Power coated tricycle landing gear with shock absorbing nose gear
  • Brushless motor
  • ESC
  • Tactic TTX600 2.4 GHz Radio
  • Balancing battery Charger
  • 9x5 prop and 1.4in (35.45mm) chrome spinner
  • Photo illustrated instruction manual
  • Four micro servos

Kit requires

  • Needle nose pliers and Phillips screwdriver for assembly

Replacement Parts

Assembly

As always, take some time to read through the instructions. The Corvalis has an intuitive build, but make sure you understand the build before starting. I would also encourage you to get the battery charging, as you will want to fly in a short period of time. The manual is fully illustrated. I have provided a few more detailed photos.

Wing

The two-piece wing has the servos installed and the navigation lighting. The lights include navigation, avoidance and a landing light. Instead of installing a servo near the ailerons and having to install another set for the flaps, the designers placed both servos opposite each other at the wing root. A heavy joiner is used and as one slips the wings together the linkages join too at the EZ link on the servo arm. Take your time, and if necessary, use a pair of hemostats to hold onto the linkage wire as you align the flaps and ailerons.

The Corvalis includes functional flaps which are much more than just aesthetically pleasing. You will enjoy the control they provide both for landing stability and short field takeoffs. Keep in mind the smooth skin of the full-scale Corvalis results from the use of composite laminates. The select scale provided by Flyzone is just as realistic and employs a similar smooth skin through accurate molding. It's an aircraft that wants to fly, wants to go fast and wants to do so with very little drag. The flaps will allow one to land with steeper glide slopes and at reduced speeds.

Fuselage

Not much to do to complete the fuselage other than adding the main gears. The nose gear is pre-installed. Here are a few pictures of the fuselage:

Landing Gear

The landing gear will mount to plastic plates glued to the fuselage. The nose gear is installed, but you will need to install the nose wheel.

Tail

Many times when you build an RTF the tail becomes permanent, and there is no way to get the plane back into the box to store it when not flying. Not the case with the Corvalis; the tail slips together and two screws securing the tail into place.

Radio Installation

The RTF version has the radio installed and is indeed ready to fly.

Completion

Setup

  • CG = 1 7/16in – 2 ˝ in (37 – 64mm) Leading edge at fuselage
  • Elevator – 15/32in. up and down (10mm) 13 degree
  • Ailerons – 9/16in. up and down (14mm) 21 degrees
  • Rudder – 1in. right and left (25mm) 31 degrees
  • Flaps – 13/16 down (21mm) 14 degrees

CG

Follow the directions and your CG will be right on target. Take a look at the battery port, and as you look to the back towards the firewall you will see a slight ledge. The ESC should be below this ledge, and your battery should be pushed all the way back and on top of that ledge. If you have small fingers you can help guide it or just turn the plane upside down as you slide the battery back, and it will seat fine. Use the provided Velcro to strap it into place. Be careful not to pull too hard on the Velcro because it may tear loose from the foam. You do not have to have a strong cinch to hold the battery, just a light cross over of the Velcro and then slip the extra into the slot on top of the fuselage. I also made sure I had the battery aligned correctly so I created the easiest route to the ESC plug, which will be just behind the motor. The cowling will slip back to the firewall, and then as you push down, it will very securely click into place

Flying

The Corvalis right up front is a wonderful flyer. Of course I have no experience in the real full-size plane, but if stability, ground tracking and glide slope are comparable, Flyzone’s Corvalis is right on target as a scale rendition. The wingspan is huge and notable. Ailerons are on the outboard of the wings with flaps on the inboard section. Flap-style hinges that use an offset hinge point for realistic flap movement actuate the flaps. The dial on the TTX transmitter operates the flaps. The elevator has excellent authority, but not too much to cause porpoise flight, and the rudder deflection provides for coordinated turns and cross-wind approach control, without setting one up for stall.

My initial flights, like all flights, took a few clicks of trim to get the plane straight and level. The TTX 600 has digital trims that you can easily hear as you bump them. The big Corvalis is fun to fly and has plenty of power in flight. You are never feeling as though the plane is underpowered. In fact, the hollow body of the Corvalis provides some realistic sounds as it resonates the brushless motor. Tracking is straight after trimming, but you need to recognize the value of the rudder in maintaining that straight flight. Before you leave the ground make absolutely sure your trims are centered and your control surfaces are centered. Look down the fuselage at the tail to ensure your rudder and elevator are centered.

Taking Off and Landing

Ground tracking is excellent (see video below). The Corvalis will turn in tight circles and the spring loaded nose wheel is absolutely strong enough to handle those tight turns. The main wheels are intimately joined with the fuselage across a plastic member and held in place with screws. The well designed combination of the main wheels and nose wheel provide perfect stability on the ground with no tendency tip or become unstable even with a hot landing or sharp turn.

Power up for takeoff has options. First, if you want to get the Corvalis in the air quickly, just firewall the throttle. This is probably the only aspect of flight that is out of scale. If you enjoy scalelike takeoffs be gradual and gentle on the throttle, and the excellent tricycle ground tracking will keep you easily centered with little stick pressure on the rudder. If you want an even more scalelike experience dial in some flaps on takeoff and practice your short field takeoffs.

Landings are where the Corvalis really shines. The flaps give you options, but realize they are not an absolute for a safe landing. If you have a long runway the glide slope is still very controllable, but much shallower than with flaps. Think about the full size version and landing process. Flaps are slightly dialed in on the downwind leg, a little more on the crosswind and then the final degrees of flaps are involved after you turn to your final approach. When you quickly maximize the flaps, the nose will rise in response to the lift over the wings. By gradually adding flaps you can trim the nose down in steps until your final approach is almost hands off. I really liked the authority the rudder provided, and you can see in the video how I could control the cross wind easily with rudder input.

Aerobatics

Loops are big and lazy as one would expect, and barrel rolls are even bigger. The wingspan, as well as the plane's low wing configuration, are doing all they can to get you back over right side up. The TTX 600 does have dual rates, and you do have the option of using the outermost servo arm positions, but I am not sure why one would do this. The plane flies so well in the factory configuration that one should enjoy what the engineers have created. Inverted flight is not a normal flight configuration, but the Corvalis does this fine with elevator input.

Is This For a Beginner?

No doubt the Corvalis flies like a beginner airplane. The ground tracking is excellent, rollout is straight with little rudder required, and once in the air, the plane handles like a dream. There are no negatives within the flight envelope. As you know, I am somewhat cautious with the word "beginner," and I think with some dual instruction, anyone can fly, but do it alone, and be prepared for failure. I highly recommend this as a first time plane if one gets some help. For those that have soloed, this is a perfect complement to your hangar.

I would be remiss in not mentioning the flaps again as these do really help with the landing, but also help with the overall slow flight stability. With some time in the pilot's seat, you learn to feel for the other flight controls on the transmitter and fully understand the need to trim for stable flight. Without a trimmed plane or as a beginner not knowing how to trim a plane, getting to the flap dial inflight might take some learning.

Flight Video/Photo Gallery

IMG_7498.jpg: Use those flaps and have some fun. IMG_7526.jpg: Slow fly is excellent. IMG_7541.jpg: On approach, the Corvalis is supreme. IMG_7551.jpg: Great turning control.

Downloads

Conclusion

For me, the true value and character of this plane is in the way it looks and flies. It is a breeze to take off, fly and land, so you get a great solid package. I think the designers have done a wonderful job of recreating the Corvalis, and in the RTF version, you have all you need to get into the air quickly. The build is quick and easy and nothing is left for you to figure out or possibly get wrong. The battery is enough to get you up and into the air for some very long flights of ten minutes plus. The tricycle gear is placed perfectly and provides ground stability with a spring loaded nose wheel. This is a plane well worth the cost and one that will provide some great flights.

The good:

  • Outstanding rendition and molding
  • Lights
  • Tricycle gear
  • Available in two versions

The not-so-good:

  • The main gear filler could use a piece of thicker double stick tape.
  • The flap servos in the factory configuration will overload and cause the servo to buzz if you over actuate the dial.
Last edited by Angela H; Feb 16, 2012 at 05:08 PM..

Discussion

Reply
Thread Tools
Old Feb 17, 2012, 05:30 AM
Dr. Dave
USA
Joined Nov 2005
1,316 Posts
This is one of the nicest flying planes I have flown. No negatives and also one of Hobbico's Tactic TX-R anylink planes. Please post your comments if you have experience with the Corvalis or your questions if you want more information.
78dave is offline Find More Posts by 78dave
RCG Plus Member
Reply With Quote
Old Feb 21, 2012, 07:20 AM
Slow Flyer
sterling, Illinois
Joined Feb 2006
1,045 Posts
Flown this beauty for sometime even full night flights but it shines on it's smooth touch down landings a plus for my otherwise ruff landings with less forgiving models, great.


Flyzone Low Wing Corvalis Deadstick Landing Full Flaps (0 min 14 sec)
wnppmy is offline Find More Posts by wnppmy
Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2012, 12:39 AM
Registered User
Sydney Australia
Joined Feb 2002
58 Posts
Hiflyer
The Corvalis has outstanding performance and low speed stall.
The outer wing cuffs and under camber plus those upturned wing tips not to mention the slotted flaps, all very inovative.
The fullscale bird has wing cuffs ,not sure if it has under camber.
hi flyer is offline Find More Posts by hi flyer
Reply With Quote
Old Feb 29, 2012, 07:28 PM
Registered User
Joined Nov 2006
422 Posts
I've been flying one of these for over a year, and i can't say enough good things about it. Great flying airplane and durable too. It could use a few more and brighter lights for full darkness flying, but that is easily rectified. There has been a thread in RCgroups on this plane that is worth reading.
Fravits is offline Find More Posts by Fravits
Reply With Quote
Old Mar 02, 2012, 12:14 PM
LNLP
Oak Harbor, Washington 98277
Joined Jan 2005
177 Posts
3 Bladed Prop

If one puts a 3 bladed prop on the Cessna Corvalis should it be a
8 X 6 or 9 X 7 or 10 X 5 prop ? What would the impact be on the
Corvalis motor? best, LNLP
LNLP is offline Find More Posts by LNLP
Reply With Quote
Old Mar 06, 2012, 05:12 AM
Dr. Dave
USA
Joined Nov 2005
1,316 Posts
8x6. It seems like I remember you drop down an inch. Not sure an 8x4 exists
78dave is offline Find More Posts by 78dave
RCG Plus Member
Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2012, 09:32 PM
Memento Mori
Diesel6401's Avatar
United States, NC, Charlotte
Joined Sep 2009
2,688 Posts
This is a very cool bird. Motor mount I re-build and I also modded with a GoPro

FlyZone Cessna Corvalis 350: AWACS Edition, Eye in the Sky (3 min 42 sec)
Diesel6401 is online now Find More Posts by Diesel6401
Reply With Quote
Old Jun 18, 2012, 05:47 AM
Dr. Dave
USA
Joined Nov 2005
1,316 Posts
With all the features offered in this plane I am surprised more are not interested. This is indeed a nice plane with flaps and lots of power. The glide slope is excellent and the durability is something worth attention. I love the low wing and consider it a transition from a high wing model. For some this may be as far as they go, but this plane in the hanger will provide many hours of flying.
78dave is offline Find More Posts by 78dave
RCG Plus Member
Reply With Quote
Old Jun 18, 2012, 12:11 PM
Registered User
Joined Nov 2006
422 Posts
Yeah, 'dave, I have wondered that myself. It is one sexy bird sitting out on the flight line. Not the best plane for hair on fire flying, not by a long shot. However, if you just want have a great flying, scale looking aircraft with no vices, the Corvalis is at the top of the list. There is no plane better for spending a lazy Sunday morning, shooting touch and goes.
Fravits is offline Find More Posts by Fravits
Reply With Quote
Old Jun 18, 2012, 12:41 PM
Long-Time Member
James Frolik's Avatar
Cologne, Germany
Joined Dec 1996
2,393 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by 78dave View Post
With all the features offered in this plane I am surprised more are not interested. This is indeed a nice plane with flaps and lots of power. The glide slope is excellent and the durability is something worth attention.
I agree.

I use a 3-blade 8.2 x 6 (or maybe 5.5 or 6.5, I don't remember exactly; it's a VarioPROP and the pitch is adjustable).
James Frolik is offline Find More Posts by James Frolik
Reply With Quote
Old Jun 26, 2012, 10:29 PM
Memento Mori
Diesel6401's Avatar
United States, NC, Charlotte
Joined Sep 2009
2,688 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fravits View Post
Yeah, 'dave, I have wondered that myself. It is one sexy bird sitting out on the flight line. Not the best plane for hair on fire flying, not by a long shot. However, if you just want have a great flying, scale looking aircraft with no vices, the Corvalis is at the top of the list. There is no plane better for spending a lazy Sunday morning, shooting touch and goes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 78dave View Post
With all the features offered in this plane I am surprised more are not interested. This is indeed a nice plane with flaps and lots of power. The glide slope is excellent and the durability is something worth attention. I love the low wing and consider it a transition from a high wing model. For some this may be as far as they go, but this plane in the hanger will provide many hours of flying.
100% agree this is a perfect sunday flier.... I love lying on really windy days, gaining a lot of altitude and just gliding around, you can really stretch the runtimes out on it. I re-did my camera setup, much MUCH better now...

FlyZone Cessna Corvalis 350 - Eye in the Sky V2 (7 min 11 sec)
Diesel6401 is online now Find More Posts by Diesel6401
Reply With Quote
Old Jun 27, 2012, 02:02 AM
Registered User
Sydney Australia
Joined Feb 2002
58 Posts
Corvalis nose gear leg

Hi, this question may have been answered previous posts. To remove the lower cowl to enable a bent nose wheel leg removal. Three screws to remove ply wood mount removed
OK is there any trick to get that lower cowl off with out damage.
Thanks for any info.
hi flyer is offline Find More Posts by hi flyer
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 05, 2012, 03:44 AM
Bryan D
United States, NM, Albuquerque
Joined Jun 2012
85 Posts
The flaps help it out alot! Watch --
Landing Of The Week #1 (0 min 20 sec)
Zia Flyer is offline Find More Posts by Zia Flyer
Reply With Quote
Old Jul 23, 2012, 05:37 AM
Registered User
United States, TN, Unicoi
Joined Jul 2012
14 Posts
I also need help. I had dumb thumbs yesterday and need to replace the front wheel assembly. Any help would be appreciated.
quadflyer82 is offline Find More Posts by quadflyer82
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Article Review of Hobbico Flyzone Cessna 350 Corvalis Rx-R 57" Michael Heer Scale ARF/RTF 11 Mar 26, 2012 12:22 PM
Discussion Help a noob out - Hobbico FlyZone Cessna 182 Skylane Select EP RTF 47.5" RCGDave Electric Plane Talk 14 Jan 25, 2012 06:06 AM
For Sale Flyzone Cessna Corvalis 350 Jae14 Aircraft - Electric - Airplanes (FS/W) 9 Oct 03, 2011 10:02 PM
Video Flyzone Cessna 350 Corvalis Diesel6401 Electric Plane Talk 0 Sep 13, 2011 08:50 PM
New Product Hobbico Flyzone Cessna 350 Corvalis Thread Endlesslag Electric Plane Talk 18 Aug 10, 2011 05:19 PM