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Old Mar 06, 2012, 12:36 PM
Capt. Z
falcon5's Avatar
United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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Great story donny, wow that's a fast engine change for sure.

Styrospray will be thick if your not at least 70 degrees room temp I hear it realy likes it about 80 to 90 degrees and 30% humidity.
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Last edited by falcon5; Mar 06, 2012 at 12:45 PM.
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 12:45 PM
Capt. Z
falcon5's Avatar
United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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I got the struts in the mail and all I can say is WOW. $50 bucks for a set of two and the quality is incredible. The suspension is sweeet!! They looked so nice it was hard to paint them white and cover up that beutifull aluminum finish. The modification will be to the two mains to take a 6" wheel or compromise and try and find a 5 1/2" wheel to put on.

Brent will be useing an identical set and those should be arriving any day.
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 12:56 PM
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United States, TX, Grand Prairie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by falcon5 View Post
I got the struts in the mail and all I can say is WOW. $50 bucks for a set of two and the quality is incredible. They looked so nice it was hard to paint them white and cover up that beutifull aluminum finish. The modification will be to the two mains to take a 6" wheel or compromise and try and find a 5 1/2" wheel to put on.

Brent will be useing an identical set and those should be arriving any day.
These are only 4.5", 16usd the price is nice and you could possibly buy a bigger size if you can find them...they look nice.



Love the look of the struts, VERY VERY nice for the price
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 01:02 PM
Have Fun! Land, Sea or Air
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United States, TX, Austin
Joined Jul 2006
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What a great match on the struts. Way cool!
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 01:32 PM
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United States, OH, Tallmadge
Joined Dec 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie P View Post
That's amazing, an engine change that fast, did you have 50 people on staff helping??

F2G1 you mention the Styrospray was goopy - did you mix up the goopy part B (or one of the parts) really, really well? When I bought my quart kit I was able to chat with a tech guy for a bit and he said it needs to be pre mixed as it separates in the can... that's before combining part A and B and then final mixing. I'll be finally joining you guys in using this stuff this week, looking fwd to it.
I pre mixed the h-e-l-l out of part B and the combined mixes. I think the viscosity is really temperature dependent. Interestingly, the horizontal stab looks better than the vertical, and i didnt sand the existing paint on the horiz. stab, only sanded and preped the vert., but when i saw i had so much material left, i threw caution into the wind, what the heck lets see how it goes......The rudder has like 'little specs' that might have been small pieces of foam pulled up from the prep sanding. EPO is funny like that.
Another thing I noticed is that the lite coat applied w/ foam brush was not very opaque. I think i really like this stuff, and i'll get better at it with a few more batches and trying different techniques. I'll bet i didnt even use 1/8 of a cup last night.
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 03:34 PM
Capt. Z
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United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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Test nose gear fit. I am 1/4" too long on the length but I think I will leave it that way to compensate for a little strut compression of the shock under the weight of the plane, so it should be just about spot on when on the ground.
Also tested the Lado electric retracts and they cranked up the strut and wheel like it didn't even have to try hard. One thing about the Lado's is that they may take just a bit longer to retract but they have a ton or torque in order to crank up heavier gear..
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 03:36 PM
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United States, TX, Grand Prairie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F2G-1 View Post
I pre mixed the h-e-l-l out of part B and the combined mixes. I think the viscosity is really temperature dependent. Interestingly, the horizontal stab looks better than the vertical, and i didnt sand the existing paint on the horiz. stab, only sanded and preped the vert., but when i saw i had so much material left, i threw caution into the wind, what the heck lets see how it goes......The rudder has like 'little specs' that might have been small pieces of foam pulled up from the prep sanding. EPO is funny like that.
Another thing I noticed is that the lite coat applied w/ foam brush was not very opaque. I think i really like this stuff, and i'll get better at it with a few more batches and trying different techniques. I'll bet i didnt even use 1/8 of a cup last night.
I tried SS100 on EPO and the EPO was too porous. I was using the 1.9 EPO foam blocks similar to what RCFoam sells but I got my EPO from a store in Tx

How did you seal up the EPO you were using?

Thx in advance
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 03:38 PM
ich bauen groß modell flugzeug
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United Kingdom, London
Joined Dec 2010
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She s looking GRRRRREat!
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 03:55 PM
Capt. Z
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United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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Still strugling with the home made oxigen mask..Kind of looks like the breathing thing the creature from the movie Predetor had on his face
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 05:12 PM
DELTAS RULE
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tehachapi, CA
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holy crap batman....that looks awesome!
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 06:31 PM
EDF rules... :)
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Sweeeeeetttt........

Eric B.
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 08:08 PM
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Man Andy, that is one fine looking project!!!!!!! W
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 08:20 PM
Capt. Z
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United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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How to start a T-38

The T-38 has no self-start capability; it needs a supply of pressurized air to rotate the engines. This air is supplied by a "huffer" unit or palouste, which is connected via a large hose to a manifold on the bottom of the airplane, near the left engine. During start, the ground crewman must manually switch the air to the other engine after the first one is started. We're ready to start, so you give the crew chief the "air" signal by raising your arms over your head, making a fist with your left hand and slamming it into your right palm. The air rushes into the right engine, and a rising whine begins as the RPM increases. At 14% RPM (12% minimum) you signal that you're ready to start. You reach down with your left hand and press the right engine start button, then move the right throttle to idle. Light-off and spool-up are quick, and the engine is stable at idle RPM less than eight seconds after ignition. The crew chief moves the air diverter valve to the left engine, and you start it the same way. You check the caution-light panel to make sure the engines and related systems are operating correctly, then the ground crewman disconnects the air hose.
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 08:21 PM
Capt. Z
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United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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T-38 Takeoff

You're at the end of the runway. Tower clears you for takeoff. You reach up with your left hand and grab the edge of the canopy frame, lift it slightly, then pull it down as your right hand moves the right sidewall-mounted locking lever forward. The canopy locks with a satisfying clunk, and the red "Canopy" light on the instrument panel extinguishes. Almost immediately, you feel a slight "fullness" in your ears as the cabin pressurization system goes to work. Taxiing into position on the runway, you turn on the pitot heat and transponder, and check the heading system again. Now the fun begins.

You point the nose down the runway, letting the plane roll forward slightly until the nosewheel is exactly straight. Now you stop and pump the brake pedals a few times before standing on them as hard as you can. You push the throttles up to the Military Power setting and wait impatiently for the engine instruments to stabilize. The brakes require a lot of effort to hold to hold the T-38 stationary at MIL power, and after 5 seconds, your legs are already beginning to tire from the effort. A quick check of the gauges, and it's time to blast off. You simultaneously release the brakes and shove the throttles past the MIL power detent and into Afterburner. The plane jumps forward, somewhat slowly at first, then with a sudden kick as the 'burners ignite. The initial acceleration in afterburner is about like that of a high performance sports car, but once past 90 knots, the acceleration rate greatly increases. Like most jets, "the faster it goes, the faster it goes faster." There is little or no engine noise in the cockpit. During the takeoff roll, you note the passing of each of the critical performance numbers, each one a milestone toward liftoff. At 135 knots, you begin applying back pressure to the stick, and at 160 knots, you lift off. The acceleration continues.

Immediately after liftoff, you raise the gear and flaps to avoid over-speeding them. More acceleration. 240 knots comes quickly, and you pull the engines out of afterburner, slowing the acceleration somewhat. You keep the nose low, only 3 or 4 degrees high, until 300 knots, then raise the nose to 12 degrees to keep the speed at the 300-knot legal maximum below 10,000 feet. (The T-38 has a waiver to the usual 250-knot limit.)
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Old Mar 06, 2012, 08:23 PM
Capt. Z
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United States, NV, Las Vegas
Joined Dec 2004
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How to land a T-38

The landing pattern is entered from "initial," an upwind leg over the runway at 1,500 feet and 300 knots. At midfield, you crisply roll into a 65- to 70-degree bank and pull the airplane around a 180-degree turn, losing 70 knots of airspeed and arriving on the downwind leg with approximately one half-mile spacing from the runway. Abeam the landing zone, you lower the landing gear and flaps, then push the power up to maintain around 200 knots. At the "perch" point, 45 degrees past the runway threshold, you roll into a 45-degree banked turn, lower the nose about 5 degrees, and begin pulling the airplane around the final turn. The T-38 has an unusual airframe buffet at its optimum final-turn Angle of Attack (AOA). New Talon pilots must develop a feel for this phenomenon, and must cross-check their airspeed, AOA and Vertical Speed carefully to avoid developing a dangerous sink rate during the final turn. Once established on final, you adjust your speed to 155 knots, plus one knot for every 100 pounds of fuel in excess of 1,000 pounds. For example, with 2,500 pounds of fuel on board, the desired final approach speed is 155+15, or 170 knots. This speed is adjusted upward for gusty winds, or no-flap configurations. (The speed for no-flap approaches is 170 knots, plus the additions mentioned above.)

There's another oddity you'll notice when landing the T-38: On final approach, your aim point must be approximately 450 feet short of the runway threshold. Approaching the threshold, you shift this aim point ever so slightly to a point about 500 feet down the runway, smoothly bring the throttles to idle, and flare very slightly. This technique results in a threshold crossing altitude of about 20 feet, and a landing approximately 500 to 800 feet down the runway. Once on the ground during a full-stop landing, the nose is raised slowly (and carefully, to avoid hopping the aircraft off the ground) to a 12 degree nose-high aerobrake attitude. This is a more effective way to slow down than using the Talon's rather weak wheel brakes. The nosewheel is lowered to the runway at 100 knots. The normal landing distance is between 4,000 and 7,500 feet, depending on pilot technique, condition of the runway, and flap position.
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