Espritmodel.com Telemetry Radio
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Old Sep 08, 2003, 07:11 PM
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ohio
Joined Aug 1999
3,586 Posts
P&B Model Esprit

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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/cover.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/cover_t.jpg" width="200"></a><br>
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<strong>Wingspan:</strong>
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54"
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<strong>Wing area:</strong>
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410 sq in.
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<strong>Weight:</strong>
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2lbs. 7 oz.  w/out  battery - 3lbs. 13 oz. w/ 10 cell rc 2400 battery
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<strong>Wing Loading:</strong>
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approx. 21 oz/sq ft. ( battery dependent.)
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<strong>Motor:</strong>
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Aveox  36-30-2
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<strong>ESC:</strong>
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Aveox  SL-48 bec
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<strong>Airframe available from:</strong>
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<a href="http://www.espritmodels.com/">Esprit Models</a>
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<strong>Motor / controller available from:</strong>
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<a href="http://www.aveox.com/">Aveox Inc.</a>
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<strong>Battery available from:</strong>
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<a href="http://www.flydma.com/">Diversity Model Aircraft</a>
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<p>
<big><strong>Introduction</strong></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
 As I become more involved with electric aircraft, I find myself wanting to have a variety of
aircraft that fill certain aspects of flight.  My E3D fills my need for 3D. I have an F-18, A-7,
and T-33 that covers the ducted fan arena. I have a Sokol and a Projeti that covers my need for
speed. I also have many sport scale aircraft and slowflyers for when I am in the mood for a more
relaxing day at the field.    The one niche that I felt needed covered in my personal collection
of aircraft was something in the everyday sport/pattern field.   The Esprit eventually ended up
being everything I wanted and more.
</p>
<p>
 I had originally narrowed my decision for a sport/pattern plane down to the Aveox Embat or the
GreatPlanes Electrostreak ARF.  I read many great things about the Embat and was impressed with
the one that I saw fly.   I have flown a couple Electrostreaks (non-arf), including one that had
been converted to glow, and was impressed with those as well. I hadn&rsquo;t made up my mind
which one to get yet when the offer to review the Esprit came in. The Esprit is billed as a
four-channel sport aerobatic model for 8-10 cells. The Esprit seemed to fill my need so I was
happy to review it. 
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<big><strong>Kit Contents</strong></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/espritbox1.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/espritbox1_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/withbox.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/withbox_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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Pink foam was packed inside the box to help protect the airframe.
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Kit contents.
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<p>
The Esprit arrived in a somewhat flimsy box.  There was some damage to the box, but nothing big
enough to worry me.   After opening the box, I was pleased to see that the box was repacked with
some protective pink foam. Also, the wing halves were repacked in the foam beds that they were
cut from. The stab components were also packed with some additional bubble wrap. Overall, the
Esprit kit was very well protected.
</p>
<p>
  The Esprit comes as a complete pre-covered ARF kit.  Included is a white fiberglass fuselage,
obechi sheeted foam wings, built up horizontal stab, solid balsa control surfaces, abs plastic
canopy / wing fairing, instructions, plans (not to scale), precut balsa formers and battery
tray, fiberglass cloth for wing reinforcement, pushrods, control horns, and some miscellaneous
hardware.  There were some slight imperfections in the glasswork, but after surveying all the
kit contents, I was impressed with the overall quality.
</p>
<p>
 The first thing I do before I start any review is to read through the instructions thoroughly.
I must say that in my 10 years of modeling, including building over 50 aircraft, these were the
most difficult instructions to follow. It was obvious that much was lost in the translation.
Luckily, the plans are clearer in regards to where the pieces fit.   After trying to make sense
of the instructions, it was obvious that I would need to use the reduced plans as my main guide
for assembly.
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<big><strong>Assembly (ARF)</strong></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingpanels.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingpanels_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/winghole.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/winghole_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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Wing panels.
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Balsa retaining ring for the front wing bolt.
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/canopy.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/canopy_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingwglass.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingwglass_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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Canopy.
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Fiberglass reinforcement cloth is epoxied to the center section of the wing. Note:
trailing edge dowel pin.
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<p>
I began assembly by removing some excess covering from the root of the wing panels.   The panels
are then glued together with epoxy while propping up one panel 20 mm (The chord on the left wing
panel was slightly larger than the right but did not cause a problem).  Next, a large round
balsa-retaining block is fabricated from two smaller pre-cut, pre-drilled pieces. The balsa that
was used for these pieces was very soft, so I hardened the structure with super-thin CA glue.  
After the CA dried, I glued this block into the precut slot near the leading edge of the wing. 
At this point a small hardwood dowel is to be sanded for fit into a nylon wing
&ldquo;receptacle&rdquo;. The hole in the receptacle was very small.  There was no way that a
dowel sanded to fit the receptacle would be able to handle flight loads of a 50-ounce or more
aircraft.  I decided to drill out the receptacle and sand the dowel down slightly to ensure
proper fit.  After I was comfortable with the fit, I glued the dowel into the trailing edge of
the wing in a hole that I had pre-drilled. The wing attachment method is a little different from
what most of us are used to.  On the Esprit, the trailing edge has the wing dowel and the
leading edge attaches with a nylon bolt.   Next, I glued hardwood servo rails into the existing
servo pocket instead of the soft balsa rails that were supplied. In preparation for the
fiberglass wing reinforcement, I began to strip the covering from the center section of the
wing.  At this point, I decided to cut out the ABS canopy. I wanted to make sure that I would
not remove the covering past the width of the abs canopy / wing fairing. Even though I cut the
canopy on the outside of the scribe lines, it still came up 1/8th of an inch short in length. 
After I finished removing the center section covering, I installed the included fiberglass cloth
with 30-minute epoxy and set it aside to dry.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingblocks.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingblocks_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingholes.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingholes_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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Hardwood wing holdown blocks.
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Holes are drilled for the wing attachment points.
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingholddown1.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingholddown1_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<p align="center">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/frontblock.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/frontblock_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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Nylon wing receptacle (trailing edge).
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Leading edge retaining wood. Note: I added the larger pre-tapped wing block for extra
strength.
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingbolt.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wingbolt_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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The included wing bolt and nut is on the right.
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<p>
While the wing was drying, I prepped the fuselage for the wing attachment points.   Four precut
pieces of hardwood were glued together to form two hardwood blocks.  A shallow groove was then
cut into those blocks to allow them to sit flush when glued up against the inside fuselage seem.
Following the plans, the blocks were then glued inside the fuse with 5-minute epoxy.   Next, I
drilled two holes through the rear wing saddle and wing block where the rear wing receptacle
would be mounted. I decided to mount the receptacle with some aftermarket hardware even though
hardware was included.   I felt safer using a somewhat larger bolt and aircraft grade nut. 
</p>
<p>
After the wing dried, I laid it down on the wing saddle and checked its symmetry. With the dowel
peg in the receptacle, I marked a spot on the fuse where the nylon wing bolt would attach. I
then removed the wing and drilled a hole through my mark on the fuse.   The Esprit kit comes
with a nylon bolt and nut that is to be used as the main wing attachment.  I was very
uncomfortable with the included nut and bolt so I decided to replace them with a &frac14;-20
nylon bolt and a pre-tapped hardwood block.  I glued my extra pre-tapped hardwood block on the
back of the included hardwood block.   Now it was time to check the final fit of the wing.   I
inserted the trailing edge peg into the receptacle and tightened down the front wing bolt.  It
fit perfect.   It takes a little getting used to the &ldquo;backward&rdquo; wing configuration
but it works very well.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/twinservos.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/twinservos_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/servohit.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/servohit_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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I had originally intended to use separate servos for aileron control.
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The servo hole was cut too far forward in the wing creating this contact between the
servos and the canopy.
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<p>
At this point I decided to attach the ailerons in preparation for the servo placement and
control horn attachment.  I used Ultracoat as the hinge material.  The instructions mention
adding independent servos for the ailerons in order to allow the use of flaperons and
speedbrakes.   I decided this would be beneficial for me since I anticipated my review model
would weigh more than the recommended flying weight.   I mounted two Hitec HS-81 servos in the
precut slot in the wing. Since it appeared that aileron clearance under the canopy might be an
issue, I decided to give the canopy a test fit on the wing. Up until this point assembly had
been moving along rather quickly, but much of that changed when trying to complete the wing.
</p>
<p>
 As soon as I set the canopy on the wing I realized I had a problem.   The precut slot in the
wing for the servos was too far forward and the front slope of the canopy was hitting the
servos.  I realized it would be a major problem because I hadn&rsquo;t even put the servo arms
on the servos yet.  I decided I was going to cut the servo opening in the wing longer in order
to allow me to slide my servos closer to the trailing edge of the wing.  I was worried about
making the servo opening too big because I didn&rsquo;t want to compromise the structural
integrity of the wing.  I began by making only small cuts into the wing in order to move the
servos back.  I became very worried about the size of the opening after four separate attempts
at moving the servos back failed.  The canopy was still hitting the servos.   It appeared that
the only way to get a servo to fit in the servos slot was to go down to one centered servo. 
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/finalwing.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/finalwing_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/controlhornprob.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/controlhornprob_t.jpg" width="200">
</a>
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I changed to one servo from two so that the servo would fit without contacting the canopy.
Note:  I added carbon fiber and extra fiberglass to strenthen the wing joint.
</td>
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The control horn back plate and screws contacting the fuselage. Note: The contact was
still present even after cutting the screws.
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<p>
Since I was replacing two servos for one, I decided to install a servo with a slightly higher
torque rating.  I chose a Hitec HS-85.   After replacing the two servos I decided to try the
canopy again.  This time the canopy fit, but that was without the servo arm.  When I mounted the
servo arm it was still hitting the inside of the canopy.  Now I was getting frustrated.  I
decided to cut the servo arm down to the last opening hoping that it would fit better.  It did
fit better, but it was still rubbing.  Now I decided that I was going to lower the servo in the
wing in hopes that it would clear the canopy better since the canopy is wider at the bottom.  I
had to remove the servo rails again and lower them into the wing.  Since I was moving the servo
again I had to remove a little more of the center section again.   At this point I was
uncomfortable with the amount of wing material that I had to remove so I decided to reinforce it
with some carbon fiber.   I ran some carbon fiber strips across the wing joint and then glassed
the center section with another coat of fiberglass cloth.   After glassing the wing again I
mounted the servo with the servo arm and checked the fit of the canopy again.  This time it
fit.  I am glad it fit because my next move was to put separate servos out into the wing panels
and keep them out from under the canopy.
</p>
<p>
Now that I had my servo issues out of the way, I decided to finish the control elements for the
wing.  My next step was to mount the control horns (included) on the ailerons.  It seemed simple
enough but  it turned out to be a little more than I had expected.  Since the aileron control
horns are also tucked under the canopy, allowances must be made so that they also don&rsquo;t
rub.  The instruction show mounting the control horns on a wedge shaped piece of wood.   The
idea behind this is to tilt them into the center of the wing and away from the canopy.  I liked
the idea shown in the instructions but I thought I had something a little easier.   I decided to
heat up the plastic control horns with my heat gun and bend them with the tilt angled toward the
center of the wing.   I mounted the control horns to the ailerons with the supplied hardware and
test fit them under the canopy. They fit perfect under the canopy, but they didn&rsquo;t fit
perfect when the wing was placed on the fuselage.   The screws and the back plate used to mount
the control horns were hitting the fuselage. I tried cutting the mounting screws very short, but
the ailerons would not travel below the neutral position.  Frustration set in again.  I had to
come up with a new way of mounting the control horns.  I wanted to make sure I wasn&rsquo;t
missing something in the instructions because of the awkward translation, so I decided to give
ZB at Espritmodels a call to see if anyone had experienced these issues before.
</p>
<p>
ZB at Espritmodels was very receptive to my call.  He told me that there were some issues with
the very first releases of the ARF version of the Esprit (The Esprit is also available as an
ARC).   He knew about the servo hole being cut too far forward on the wing causing issues with
the servos hitting the canopy.  He said that he was also aware of the issues with the control
horns hitting the fuselage.  ZB recommended that I mount the servo upside down on the bottom of
the wing and use torque rods in the center of the wing.  The torque rods would eliminate the
need for the control horns and thus eliminate the binding issue.   I knew that I didn&rsquo;t
want the servo mounted on the bottom of the wing because it would have the possibility of
interfering with the wires or battery in the fuselage.  The last thing that ZB told me before I
hung up was that the new version of the Esprit would have separate servos mounted out in the
wing panels.  His last statement had me wishing for a new version of the wing.  After my call I
felt a little better knowing it wasn&rsquo;t just me having this problem, but I
also hadn&rsquo;t solved my problem yet.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/controlhornfix.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/controlhornfix_t.jpg" width=
"200"></a>
</td>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wing2.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wing2_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
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Some of the wood from the aileron was cut out to allow the control horn back plate to be
countersunk.
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
Final aileron control setup.  Note:  The control horns were "bent" inward using a heat
gun.
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<p align="center">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wing3.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/wing3_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/srvohornsfinal.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/srvohornsfinal_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
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Final control horn setup.
</td>
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Final aileron control setup with canopy attached.
</td>
</tr>
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<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/canopygap.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/canopygap_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
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Small cuts were made to the rear sides of the canopy to keep the ailerons and control
horns from interfering with it.
</td>
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</tbody>
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</td>
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</table>
<p>
To solve my problem, I decided to countersink the back plates of the control horns.   I marked
the back of the ailerons along the edge of the back plates. I then removed the back plates and
carved out some of the aileron balsa.   After the balsa was carved out, I remounted the back
plate and installed the wing on the fuselage.  It worked.   The aileron was now free to move up
and down while the wing was on the fuselage.  To finish my aileron control, I used 2-56 pushrods
with a z-bend on one end a clevis on the other.   The Esprit kit comes with pre-bent control
rods for the ailerons but they proved to be too short.  Next, I test fit the canopy to make sure
the servo and all of the control elements fit under it.  As outlined in the instructions, small
cuts needed to be made to the rear of the canopy to allow the ailerons to clear it. Everything
fit, finally, so I mounted the canopy to the wing with strips of white vinyl trim sheet.  Now
that the frustration of the wing was behind me, I decided to move on to the horizontal stab.
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabattach.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabattach_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabgap.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabgap_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
A small nylon bolt was provided to attach the stab to the fuse.
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
The slot in the leading edge of the stab was too big. It allowed the stab to
rock from side to side on the fuse.
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabfix.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabfix_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
The edges of the stab slot were filled with scrap balsa to ensure a tight fit.
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
<p>
The horizontal stab is attached to the fuselage with a nylon bolt that is included.   The
stab bolt is inserted through the stab and screwed into a pre-tapped hole in the fuse.  The hole
in the stab is already made, but the covering over it needs to be removed.   It sounds simple
enough, but when I went to screw the bolt in the fuse it would not screw all the way in.  The
threads in the fuse seem to be tapped into an epoxy / microballoon mix.   There was some excess
mixture at the end of the threads that was preventing the screw from going all the way down.  I
had to re-tap the hole in order to allow the bolt to go in smoothly.   Next, I bolted the stab
to the fuse and ran into another small problem.  The leading edge of the stab has a cutout in it
that allows the stab the cradle the fin.  The cutout was too large. It allowed the stab to rock
from side to side on the fuse.   I added small pieces of scrap balsa to the inside of the stab
to prevent it from moving on the fuse.  After I was comfortable with the fit of the stab, I
removed it in order to work on the fin post and rudder.
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/finpost.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/finpost_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/elevatorthick.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/elevatorthick_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
The finpost is cut from the balsa stick and glued into the slot on the back of the fin.
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
The elevator is thicker than the stab.
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabrudder.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/stabrudder_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
Completed control surfaces.
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>
The fin post was cut from a larger piece of balsa and then glued into the opening at the
rear of the fin (5-minute epoxy was used).  After the epoxy was dry, I covered the exposed fin
post with white Ultracoat.   My next step was to attach the elevator and rudder.   I decided to
use Ultracoat for the hinge material.   When I went to attach the elevator to the stab, I
noticed that the elevator was about 1/16<sup>th</sup> of an inch thicker at the leading edge.  
I didn&rsquo;t think that it would pose a big problem but it did bother me because it could
cause some drag hanging lower than the stab.   Attaching the stab and the elevator was rather
easy.   Attaching the rudder to the fin took a little more time because the fin is made of
fiberglass.  I needed to increase the temperature setting on my iron to get the Ultracoat to
stick to the fin properly.   Now that I had my control surfaces attached, I began installing the
servos.
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/servos1.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/servos1_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/elevatorcontrol.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/elevatorcontrol_t.jpg" width="200">
</a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
Elevator and rudder servos.
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
Elevator control.
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/ruddrpush.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/ruddrpush_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
Rudder control. Note: A slot must be cut into the side of the fuse where the pushrod
exits. 
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>
The servos are supposed to be installed on balsa rails that will eventually also incorporate a
balsa battery tray.  Once again I was uncomfortable with the softness of the balsa supplied.  I
decided to use hardwood for the servo rails and ditched their battery tray idea all together.  
I wasn&rsquo;t comfortable with the strength of the completed tray, and as designed it would
interfere with my power and radio systems.  I used Hitec HS-81 servos for the elevator and
rudder. After mounting the servos, I ran 4-40 pushrods out to the control surfaces. For the
rudder pushrod, a small slit must be cut into the fuselage side for the pushrod to exit. The
Esprit came with pushrods but they were very flimsy.  I decided to use aftermarket control horns
and hardware for the rudder and elevator, although the included control horns seemed fine. I
used quick connect clevises to attach the pushrods to the control horns.
</p>
<p>
<strong>Motor System</strong>
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motorbox.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motorbox_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motor.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motor_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
Aveox motor and controller.
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
Aveox motor and controller.
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motorcompare2.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motorcompare2_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
Aveox 36/30/2 compared to a speed 400.
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>
There are many options available when considering a power system for the Esprit.   P&B Model
recommends a Velcom 24/12 brushed motor on 8 cells or a Velcom 24/16 brushed motor for 8 to 10
cells.  Esprit model recommends a Mega brushless 22/20/3 or a 22/30/3 for an 8-cell pack.  I was
definitely leaning toward the brushless route when I heard that there might be a possibility to
review an Aveox motor system with the Esprit.   To be completely honest, I had some mixed
experiences with Aveox in the past.  My first brushless motor was an Aveox 1114/4y (that I still
have to this day) with over 300 flights on it.   That motor has performed flawlessly from day
one.   I have also had Aveox F-16 and F-27 motors that had demagnetizing problems. 
</p>
<p>
I had seen many great things about the new line of Aveox sensorless motors and controllers and
definitely wanted to give one of the new motors a try.  I originally thought of using a 36/24/3
(new version of the 1409/3) but after a quick call to Aveox , decided to go all out.  We decided
to use the Aveox 36/30/2 and SL-48 bec controller on ten cells.  What a great choice it would
turn out to be!
</p>
<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Aveox
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Kv (rpm/volt)
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Io
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Rm (ohms)
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Weight  (oz.)
</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
36/30/2
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
1460
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
2.2
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
.018
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
9.95
</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
<br>
<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Aveox
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Cells
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Peak amps 
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Cont. amps
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
Weight  (oz.)
</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
SL-48 bec
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
6-16
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
60 - 80
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
45 - 60
</p>
</td>
<td valign="top" valign="top" width="118">
<p>
1.4
</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
<br>

<p>
In preparation for mounting the motor, I needed to drill holes in the front of the fuse to match
the holes on the motor.  After my holes were drilled, I cut out the air inlet holes in the front
of the fuse with a very small hi-speed grinding wheel. I decide to solder the motor to the
controller at this point so I could lower it into the nose of the fuse in one piece (I added a
Deans connector to the controller for the battery).   I lowered the motor into the fuse and
lined up the mounting holes only to run into another problem.  The Fuse had a plywood motor
mount that is epoxied to the back of the fuse nose.   There was some excess epoxy on the sides
that prevented the motor from being mounted flush up against the plywood.  I had to run a drill
bit through the side of the fuse air inlet hole to grind away the excess epoxy.  I  removed the
excess epoxy and lowered the motor back into the fuse.  This time the motor wasn&rsquo;t rocking
back on the excess epoxy, but it had excessive down thrust.   It appeared that the motor mount
was slightly off center in the fuse.  I decided to shim the motor with washers up against the
back of the motor mount to lessen the down thrust. The motor was mounted with 4-40 screws.
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motorairholes.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/motorairholes_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/batterytray.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/batterytray_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
42mm spinner with 5mm shaft adapter. Note: air inlets.
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
Battery tray and "seatbelt".
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/donemounting.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/donemounting_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="100%" colspan="2">
Battery tray mounted.
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>
Since I  previously skipped the installation of the included battery tray, I needed to come up
with a simple installation.  I used 1/8<sup>th</sup> inch aircraft plywood as the bed for my
tray.   I slowly narrowed the width of the tray until I could lower it into the bottom of the
fuse with the battery attached. I used Velcro to attach the battery. I was a little
uncomfortable with the Velcro holding down a ten cell battery so I built a
&ldquo;seatbelt&rdquo; out of an additional loop of Velcro and attached it to the back of the
tray. I glued the tray into the bottom of the fuse with 5-minute epoxy. Next, I mounted a
Graupner 42mm spinner with 5mm adapter to the motor shaft. After playing with some different
props on the "motor test stand" on Aveox's website, I decided to mount a APC 9x6 electric prop
on the spinner.
</p>
<p>
<strong>Motor Test</strong>
</p>
<p>
The Esprit was finally complete except for the application of the decals.  I put the decals on
hold because I couldn&rsquo;t wait to fire up the big Aveox.  I put my trusty ten-cell RC-2400
mah battery on charge and prepped for the run up.  After the battery was charged, I plugged my
Astroflight Whattmeter between it and the controller.   The Aveox controller has a nice audible
beep to let you know that it is armed (I used the factory controller settings. The settings can
be easily changed via dipswitches on the back of the controller).  I slowly advanced the
throttle and was amazed how hard the fuse was trying to pull out of my hand. The numbers on the
Whattmeter were equally impressive, 522 watts at 52 amps.   That is about 137 watts per pound
considering my ready to fly weight was 61 oz.  To say I was happy was an understatement; at
least I knew I wouldn&rsquo;t be lacking for power.  Now that I had a big smile on my face I
decided to apply the decals.
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/decals.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/decals_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/nodecal.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/nodecal_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/nodecal4.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/nodecal4_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/decals2.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/decals2_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" colspan="2" width="100%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/decals1.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/decals1_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" colspan="2" width="100%">
Vinyl decals.
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>

<p>
The decals in the kit did not match the decals that were shown on the box.   I looked through
the instructions and plan for any suggestions on where to put them. I couldn&rsquo;t find any
suggestions so I decided to &ldquo;wing&rdquo; it. My last step in assembling the Esprit was to
paint the canopy with black acrylic paint.  The Esprit was complete. I couldn't wait to take it
to the field.
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<strong><big>Flying</big></strong>
</p>
<blockquote>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/preflight.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/preflight_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/preflight2.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/preflight2_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>
While my battery was charging, I decided to re-check the throws on my control surfaces (I
brought along a 4-cell receiver pack to check throws and do a range test.   The receiver pack
was not used during flight).   After I was sure that my throws matched those recommended in the
instructions, I anxiously slid the charged battery into the fuse.   I plugged in the battery
pack and heard a nice tone from the Aveox controller.  I attached the wing and made that much
anticipated walk out to the flight line.  I ran the Aveox up to full throttle and gave it a
swift toss into the air.   The Esprit immediately accelerated from my hand and took off into a
slow banking left turn. With three clicks of right trim and two clicks of down trim I was flying
straight.  I was caught a little off guard by how quick the Esprit was, so I decided to cut the
throttle to half to get adjusted to the handling characteristics.  The Esprit is very quick even
at half throttle.  I flew around in a big oval doing some small loops and rolls. The Esprit
responds to the controls with a crispness that is lacking in most of my other models.  I am sure
you have heard this before. The Esprit flies like it is on rails.  When full throttle is
applied, the loops can be almost as big as you like.  The Esprit flies inverted almost as well
as it flies right side up.   Only a small amount of down elevator is needed to keep it flying
level. Next, I tried a couple of stall turns.  The rudder is not as effective as I had hoped it
would be but I found myself  forgetting that it was there sometimes. The stall turns were slow
and graceful. Now I wanted to see what its vertical performance was like.  I came down out of a
shallow dive and went to full throttle while pulling up into a vertical climb.   The Esprit
accelerated up and quickly became a speck in the sky before it ran out of steam. I cut the
throttle at the top of the climb in order to see how well it would glide back down.  The glide
ratio was much better than I had anticipated.  I slowly began to pull up on the elevator to try
to get it to stall.  The Esprit covered a lot of airspace before it stalled.  The stall was very
gentle and straight-ahead at first, but then it fell of to the left and spun a little. Recovery
from the stall is very easy.  Let the Esprit build up a little speed and then slowly add up
elevator.  Most of my flying was done at half throttle.  Full throttle is not needed until some
type of vertical maneuver is to be performed.   I flipped over to high rate ailerons to try some
high-speed rolls.  The rolls are very fast with a small tendency to lose altitude when
it&rsquo;s inverted.  High rate elevator is not needed and tends to make the Esprit a little
twitchy.  After many more loops and rolls, the Aveox began to loose power so I set up the Esprit
for a landing.  The glide path on landing is rather shallow since the Esprit retains its energy
well. A very small flair is needed just before the moment of touchdown.  Upon touchdown, the
Esprit skidded along the grass for a considerable distance. What an impressive flight it was! I
looked down at my timer and saw 7 minutes and 25 seconds.   The flight time was impressive as
well.   I walked over to the Esprit and picked it up off of the grass.   I could hardly contain
my enthusiasm.  On my way back to the pits a fellow club member remarked, &ldquo; not really any
need for gas anymore is there&rdquo;.  I responded with a big &ldquo;nope, not really&rdquo;.
</p>
<p>
<strong>Diversity Model Aircraft Battery</strong>
</p>
<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" width="350" align="center" bgcolor="#000000" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<table cellspacing="10" cellpadding="4" bgcolor="#E6E6E6" border="0">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center" width="50%">
<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/battery.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/sep/esprit/battery_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" align="center">
10-cell zapped 2600 mah nimh battery pack.
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
<br>
<p>
I learned through an &ldquo;Ezone Authors&rdquo; email that some electric flight companies would
be willing to provide certain products for reviewers.  One of the companies was Diversity Model
Aircraft.  I had a good experience with a pack I had purchased from them in the past so I sent
Steve at DMA an email.  My old trusty ten-cell pack was just that, old. It was still giving good
performance but something told me that I could do better.   After a couple of emails back and
forth, Steve decided that a 10 cell zapped pack of 2600 nimh&rsquo;s would be just the ticket.
He was right. The pack arrived 5 days later. 
</p>
<p>
As soon as the battery arrived, I headed to the basement and prepared the Esprit for a trip to
the field. At the field, I stuck the battery on the charger at 5 amps (Steve said in his last
email not to worry about cycling it. He recommended the 5-amp charge rate.).   After the battery
was charged, I plugged it into the Whattmeter that I had already connected to the controller.  I
slowly advanced the throttle and was amazed at what I saw and felt.   With the Diversity Model
Aircraft battery, I saw 683 watts at 63 amps. That is 179 watts per pound.  The Aveox was
pulling like never before.  I was a little worried about the current that I saw, but knew that I
would be using full throttle sparingly.  
</p>
<p>
I quickly prepped the Esprit for flight and walked out onto the field.   I ran the Aveox up to
full throttle and gave it a firm toss.   The acceleration from my hand was unbelievable.   I
climbed out to two mistakes high in a matter of seconds.   I pulled the throttle back and
cruised around for a few seconds deciding what I wanted to try with my newfound power.   I had
to try a vertical climb out.   I passed the center of the field at full throttle and pulled
straight up.  The Esprit didn&rsquo;t seem to slow down.  It quickly became a speck in the sky
with no sign of running out of steam.  This is what I had hoped to attain when I left my glow
sport aircraft behind.  All of the maneuvers were much larger and quicker.  The loops were now
as large as I wanted them.  The high rate rolls were extremely fast.  I flew around doing loops
and rolls all over the sky. Before I knew it, the motor cut-off kicked in and I was without
power.   I pulled the throttle back and slowly advanced it up again.  I had enough power to come
around for a landing.  The landing was uneventful, and once again the Esprit slid to a stop. I
looked down at my timer and saw 8 minutes and 5 seconds.  I was ecstatic. Finally, I had the
electric sport / pattern aircraft that I had been looking for!
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<strong><big>Conclusion</big></strong>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
In the end, the Esprit exceeded all my expectations. It is one of the truest flying aircraft I
have flown. It is very quick and responsive.  Most of the praise goes to the combination of the
Aveox power system and the Diversity Model Aircraft battery.   They both performed flawlessly. 
With the new high temperature magnets and sensorless design, Aveox has once again put itself
among the best brushless motors in the r/c marketplace. The Diversity Model Aircraft
pack transformed the Esprit into a high performance machine.  On the other hand, the assembling
of the Esprit turned out to be my most frustrating ARF build in over ten years of modeling.  ZB
at Esprit Model told me that most, if not all, of the issues I had with my review model were
addressed in the new kits.   So hopefully you too can experience the thrill of this aircraft
without the frustration of building the older version.
</p>
</blockquote>
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