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Old Aug 23, 2003, 07:43 PM
BEC
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Auburn, Washington USA
Joined Jan 2001
12,935 Posts
Wright Brothers R/C Electric Mite

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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Preflight_2.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Preflight_2_t.jpg" width="248">
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<strong>Wingspan:</strong>
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28 inches (71 cm)
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<strong>Wing area:</strong>
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154 square inches (10 sq. dm)
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<strong>Weight:</strong>
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5.5-6.5 ounces (156-184 gm) suggested, 4.7 to 5.7 ounces (133-162 gm) as flown
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<strong>Wing Loading:</strong>
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5.1 &ndash; 6.1 ounces/sq. foot (15.6 &ndash; 18.4 g/sq. dm) suggested, 4.4
&ndash; 5.3 ounces/sq. foot (45.5 &ndash; 48 g/sq. dm) as flown
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<strong>Motor:</strong>
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GWS IPS (also known as the RXC motor) in the GWS EDP-50 direct drive power
system
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 <strong>Prop:</strong>
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GWS "Hyperdrive" 3X2 (supplied in the power system)
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<strong>Flight Battery:</strong>
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7X300 mAh NiMH and<br>
2X700, 1020 and 1200 mAh Li-Poly
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<strong>Power loading as flown:</strong>
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About 45W/lb. (100W/kg)
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<strong>ESC:</strong>
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Kontronik Micro-10 and WattAge IC-2A both tested
</td>
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<strong>Radio:</strong>
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GWS R4P receiver, two FMADirect PS-20 servos (also used Hitec HS-55s),<br>
GWS 4-channel transmitter
</td>
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<strong>Available From:</strong>
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Wright Brothers R/C<br>
13 Furber Drive<br>
Lee, NH 03824<br>
Phone: 603-659-9688 (<a href=
"http://www.wrightbrothersrc.com/">www.wrightbrothersrc.com</a>).
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<p>
<big><b>Introduction</b></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
The Wright Electric Mite is a 28 inch span interpretation of a 1958 single channel radio control
model called the Guided Mite, originally designed by Bob Coon and intended for Cox PeeWee .020
power and pulse rudder only control. This variant was developed over the course of several
iterations by Allan Wright in 2001, and was released as a laser-cut kit by Wright Brothers R/C
in November of that year. I received mine early in 2002 but then got sidetracked with several
other projects, though I did get it to flying status late last summer. Anyway, recently Shawn
reminded me about it, so I pulled it down and have been doing some more flying (it had one
successful and one unsuccessful flight on it before). Enough wordy excuses, let&rsquo;s get to
it.
</p>
<p>
Here is what Allan Wright has to say about the airplane (stolen right off his web site at
www.wrightbrothersrc.com): "The Electric Mite is designed as an affordable entry point into
micro-R/C. It performs well on the most inexpensive micro-R/C equipment currently available and
is a true "Park" flyer, being able to be flown in areas as small as a high school baseball
field. Beginners will find the Electric Mite predictable in the air, and experienced pilots will
enjoy its responsive controls and maneuverability." Now that I have a couple of hours of air
time on mine, I have to pretty much agree with this description.
</p>
<p>
<b>A Little More About The Airplane</b>
<br>
The Wright Electric Mite is a high-wing three channel (rudder/elevator/throttle) cabin plane,
designed around a direct-drive GWS IPS motor and the press-on 3X2 prop (the EDP-50 system),
though there is room in its square nose for a geared setup &ndash; perhaps one of the LPS
variants. However, mounting such a geared motor system would be left as an exercise to the
builder. The fuselage is built primarily from 1/16 sheet balsa, with 1/8 inch bulkheads, and is
therefore quite rugged. The tail group is all 1/16 balsa sheet, with 1/16 ply laser-cut control
horns. The wing is a light built-up structure. The landing gear is 1/16 inch music wire (plenty
stout for a 4.5-6 ounce airplane), with a pair of those thin GWS parkflyer wheels(included in
the kit), and a fixed tail skid. The battery compartment is quite generous and will easily hold
a 7 cell 300/370 mAh NiMH pack or a two cell 1020 mAh Kokam or 1200 mAh E-Tech LiPoly pack.
</p>
<p>
As noted in Mr. Wright&rsquo;s description above, it&rsquo;s intended to be a low-cost entry
into "micro R/C", but is intended to be an outdoor small-space flyer. As such it is heavier (and
more rugged) than most dedicated indoor flyers, yet smaller and lighter than most "park flyer
types" and I can vouch for it being comfortable to fly within the confines of a school baseball
diamond. I have also flown it in a large indoor venue (an ex-Navy hangar that was once home to a
number of PBY Catalinas) and found it was comfortable in that space as well. I don&rsquo;t
think, with stock sized control surfaces anyway, that it would be comfortable in a much smaller
indoor venue. In the front matter of the instruction manual, Allan suggests that extending the
span to 34 inches and perhaps using a geared motor would make it more suitable for indoor
flying. I have seen pictures of others flying Electric Mites in gymnasiums, however.
</p>
<p>
It&rsquo;s big enough to carry what is now commonplace micro radio equipment &ndash; the GWS
4-channel receiver and two FMADirect PS-20s are in mine, along with a 2-5A speed control
(I&rsquo;m actually using a Kontronik Micro-10). Even so, it is still quite compact and has, to
me, an endearlingly homely but perky look to it &ndash; one of those airplanes that&rsquo;s so
ugly it&rsquo;s cute (sorry, Allan). I think the reason I was interested it in the first place
is that I&rsquo;m a sucker for small cute airplanes.
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<big><b>Kit Contents</b></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
The Electric Mite kit comes in a plastic bag, with the plan wrapped around the wood parts. It is
what I would call a laser-cut implementation of a traditional wood kit. That is, all the shaped
parts are cleanly laser cut and fit with no additional trimming required, but there are no
self-jigging features that take advantage of a laser-cutter&rsquo;s ability to create complex
shapes. With such simple lines, though, it still builds very quickly and easily.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Kit.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Kit_t.jpg" width="44"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/kit_content1.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/kit_content1_t.jpg" width=
"272"></a>
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The kit in its bag
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Opened up and spread out
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<p>
Included in the kit are four sheets of laser cut parts, strip balsa for the wing structure, a
crisp full sized plan, a small bag of hardware bits (including control horns and wheels) an
eight-page instruction manual and sheet showing the layouts of all four laser cut sheets, to aid
in part identification. Wright Brothers R/C has also posted the manual on their web site here:
<a href="http://www.wrightbrothersrc.com/docs/emite_instructions.pdf">http://www.wrightbrothersrc.com/docs/emite_instructions.pdf</a>. The pictures in the on-line version
are color and a bit easier to see. The wood in my kit was of very high quality &ndash; medium to
light weight and with very nice grain selection. The contents of my kit weighed 2.7 ounces.
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<big><b>Building Notes</b></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
In general I built it following the supplied instructions. There were a some spots where I had a
question or disagreed with the sequence of steps. Here are translations of my margin notes in
the instruction manual:
</p>
<p>
Step 4 calls for putting some 1/4 inch wide strips as doublers on on the fuselage sides in
several places, using scrap from the laser-cut sheets. In my kit there were no scrap strips that
wide. There is enough material to make about 3/16 inch wide strips, and this is plenty for the
intended application. Confusing me a little further was that these strips are drawn even
narrower than 3/16 inch on the plan. Just use strips from the edges of the 1/16 sheets and
don&rsquo;t worry the width, it&rsquo;s not critical.
</p>
<p>
Step 7 details the installation of the tail skid, but if you install it this early it will be in
the way as you attach the stabilizer to the fuselage, preventing setting it down on a flat
surface. I&rsquo;d suggest installing the inner support as directed at this point (a doubler on
the stabilizer that will be inside the fuselage) but to save the external installation of the
skid and its support until after step 11.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Parts_laid_out.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Parts_laid_out_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/formers_on_side.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/formers_on_side_t.jpg" width=
"200"></a>
</p>
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Fuselage Parts laid out on the plan
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Formers installed on the right hand fuselage side
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<p>
One item that is not provided in the kit is the are the elevator and rudder pushrods.
They&rsquo;re just supposed to be in installed at step 17, thoug there are some suggestions on
the plan. I wound up making up my pushrods from bamboo skewers with 1/32 music wire ends held in
place with heat-shrink tubing and CA. Since there&rsquo;s no support for the pushrods in the
fuselage, I don&rsquo;t think pushrods made out of 1/32 wire alone would be stiff enough.
</p>
<p>
I opted not to use the optional battery door in the bottom of the fuselage (step 19).
</p>
<p>
There is nothing on the plan that indicates how the wingtip pieces should be installed. They
should be installed flat to the board, then a bit of top spar material run from the end rib down
to the tip piece to support the covering there. Also, I cut a piece of shear web material to the
angle shown on the plans and used it to set the angle of the root rib (steps 20 and 21).
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/wing_root.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/wing_root_t.jpg" width="200"></a>
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The left wing root, showing the angled inboard end of the shear web setting the
rib angle
</td>
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<p>
After step 22 the wing panels need to be pulled from the building board and the spars, LE and TE
sanded flush to the root ribs in preparation for joining the panels in step 23.
</p>
<p>
In step 23, it will help to pre-shape the leading and trailing edge pieces before installing
them between the pinned-down wing panels. The top center section sheeting then wraps over the
TE, the ribs and the LE. Adding the lower sheeting then forms essentially a stressed-skin wing
center section which holds the outboard panels at the proper dihedral angle. This looks a little
odd but really works, and should you smack the plane into an obstacle is easy to repair. I
learned this one night at an indoor session when the plane rolled into the hangar door on
landing.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/wing_done.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/wing_done_t.jpg" width="273"></a>
</td>
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Looking at the bottom of the wing after the panels are joined by the center
section sheeting
</td>
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</td>
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<br>
<br>

<p>
Covering the E-Mite&rsquo;s wing was my first (and so far only) attempt at using colored
Reynold&rsquo;s plastic food wrap for covering. This material is very inexpensive, won&rsquo;t
shrink up so hard as to warp a light structure, and is quite light. But it is fussy to put on
and makes SoLite&rsquo;s tendency to stick to itself look minor in comparison. Allan Wright has
a link on his site to how-to article by Dave Robelen in Model Airplane News (pick <a href=
"http://www.wrightbrothersrc.com/tips/index.htm">Tips</a> on the Wright Brothers R/C site) for
applying this stuff. I admit I didn&rsquo;t go to quite such lengths myself, but in the end the
result was acceptable. Instead of following Dave&rsquo;s method, I used a glue stick to apply
adhesive to the framework and worked the covering into place by hand. Final shrinkage was done
using a heat gun held at arms length or further away from the wing.
</p>
<p>
As with all my models, graphics by Greg Judy (<a href=
"http://www.vinylgraphicsbygreg.com/">www.vinylgraphicsbygreg.com</a>) topped off the wing.
</p>
<p>
I gave the sheet fuselage and tail a couple of coats of clear dope to seal the wood, but have
yet to apply any color. I didn&rsquo;t tape the control surfaces in place until after doing
this, even though the instructions have you installing them way back at step 15.
</p>
<p>
<b>Equipment Installations</b>
<br>
A pair of cradles are provided to support the motor inside the nose, but I only used one so that
I could put a heat sink on the motor (though I never did actually do that). The rear of the
motor butts up against the front of the battery box and is supported in front by a hole in the
nose cowl. I&rsquo;d recommend just tack-gluing the top nose sheet in place so it is easy to
remove should you want to get back at the motor for replacment or to help support it when
pushing on a replacement prop.
</p>
<p>
The receiver and ESC mount in the area above the battery box. There&rsquo;s plenty of room for
the GWS R4P/N type receivers or a Berg MicroStamp. Aft of this area go the servos. The tiny FMA
PS-20s look lost in there &ndash; there is plenty of room for bigger ones (though you really
don&rsquo;t want to go heavier than, say, Hitec HS-55s, or GWS Naros for weight reasons).
They&rsquo;re just attached inside the flat fuselage sides with servo tape and that&rsquo;s
plenty strong enough.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/instls.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/instls_t.jpg" width="280"></a>
</td>
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Here are the bits to make the airplane work. This is an early picture, showing
HS-55s and a WattAge IC-2A along with the GWS Rx and the motor.
</td>
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</td>
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<br>
<br>

<p>
As I mentioned before, the aft end of the fuselage is open inside to the tail &ndash; there are
no pushrod supports. The pushrod exits are pre-cut by laser for you.
</p>
</blockquote>
<p>
<big><b>Flying</b></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
All up, my Electric Mite weighs 3.5 ounces plus the weight of the battery. With a two-ounce
battery (7X300 NiMH) all the way forward in the battery box, it balances in about the middle of
the CG range shown on the plan.
</p>
<p>
For the first flight I took my Mite to a schoolyard near my home and set it down on the infield
of a baseball diamond to attempt an ROG takeoff. Maybe I&rsquo;m strange, but I expect a plane
with wheels to be able to take off. Anyway, after a longish run, it did take off and established
a solid if not rapid climb behind that little 3X2 prop. My first thought was "gee, this is
noisy" and indeed it sounds something like a tiny Zagi with that little prop so close to the
flat nose. But right after that I found out that it was much more responsive in both pitch and
laterally than I expected with such tiny control surfaces (they&rsquo;re only 3/8 of in inch
wide). It loops easily and will keep on looping as long as you like. And, if you feed in some up
elevator along with the rudder it is surprisingly agile in turns and can easily be kept over
that baseball infield if you like.
</p>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/head_on.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/head_on_t.jpg" width="377"></a>
</td>
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Head-on view
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
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<br>
<br>

<p>
Low speed handling is good&hellip;.. the controls stay effective pretty much right down to a
stall, and the stalls are barely more than a pause in the air followed by the nose dropping,
followed right after that by resuming flying. There is no tendency to pay off on either wing.
</p>
<p>
With this sort of low speed handling, touch and goes are pretty easy (on a smooth surface) and
wheel landing or three-pointers can be done. Once the tail comes down, steering with the small
rudder and the fixed skid is doable, but not easy. There&rsquo;s plenty of rudder for keeping it
straight on a takeoff roll, but not really enough control for taxiing very well. On pavement the
fixed wire skid just slides around and you get groundloops. This is pretty much true of any
plane set up with a fixed wire tailskid.
</p>
<br>
<p>
<b>Power System Experiments</b>
<br>
Since the first few flights I&rsquo;ve tried several other batteries. Now that lithium-polymer
is here, there are all kinds of alternatives that suit the plane well. Probably the best
recommendation I can make is a two-cell pack of either E-Tec 700s or Kokam 640s. The current
draw of the IPS motor with the 3X2 prop is low enough that perhaps even two Kokam 560s would
work. With such a battery all the way forward the plane will be near the aft CG limit, but even
there it&rsquo;s plenty stable. And with such a pack the all-up weight is less than 5 ounces,
which gives that little motor and prop less weight to accelerate and lightens up the handling
noticeably. At this lighter weight ROGs from short grass are even possible, though you may need
to give it a bit of a push to start it rolling.
</p>
<p>
Also, in the air, with these lighter batteries, it is possible to coax a rudder roll out of the
airplane, though you have to trade a good amount of altitude for airpseed first. On most
attempts it comes over to inverted and then just stays there with me holding full forward stick.
You can actually just fly it around inverted like this for some time, though it wants to roll
back out the way it came in to inverted. But yes, inverted flight is possible.
</p>
<p>
On the other hand, if you want to fly a long, long, time you can put in a 2s pack of Kokam or
E-Tec 1200s. I did over one hour of circuits, figure eights and touch and goes at an indoor
session in a hangar one night with an E-Tech pack like this. Perhaps better would be three or
four flights on one charge, though <font face="Wingdings">J</font> .
</p>
<br>
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<a href="/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Preflight_1.jpg"><img height="150" src="http://static.rcgroups.com/articles/ezonemag/2003/aug/emite/Preflight_1_t.jpg" width="202">
</a>
</td>
</tr>
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Ready to go!
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
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</blockquote>
<p>
<big><b>Conclusion</b></big>
</p>
<blockquote>
<p>
The Wright Electric Mite is exactly what it is advertised to be &ndash; a rugged and pretty
low cost entry into micro R/C that is a true park flyer. By that I mean it is light enough and
maneuverable enough to be flown in small park without having to worry about hurting someone
that might wander in into the flight area. It also works well in a large indoor venue.
It&rsquo;s easy to fly, and surprisingly responsive to the controls. It flies well on a $10
motor/prop combination. It also builds easily. If such a plane is what you&rsquo;re looking
for, the Electric Mite is well worth your consideraton.
</p>
</blockquote>

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Old Aug 25, 2003, 10:26 AM
Gambler-AG DLG Designer
Allan Wright's Avatar
Lee, NH, USA
Joined Jun 2001
5,174 Posts
I'll have one of my Electric Mites at NEAT fair and will be flying it if anyone is interested in seeing the mite fly in person.

Allan Wright
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Old Aug 26, 2003, 12:46 AM
BEC
Registered User
BEC's Avatar
Auburn, Washington USA
Joined Jan 2001
12,935 Posts
Good! Hopefully we can meet, then.
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Old Aug 26, 2003, 08:48 AM
Gambler-AG DLG Designer
Allan Wright's Avatar
Lee, NH, USA
Joined Jun 2001
5,174 Posts
Sure thing! I'll be sitting with the group from the 'NH Flying Misfits' We'll probably have our banner out. Look for the Electric Mite on my blanket. It should be familliar. It's the one pictured on the website. Can you say slow-motion pylon racing with Electric Mites? LOL!

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