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Old Oct 14, 2001, 04:20 AM
Single-task at best...
tim hooper's Avatar
Telford, UK
Joined Feb 2000
7,501 Posts
What does "it's a wash" mean?

I've read it several times, but can't fathom it.

Is it; good, bad, a non-event or simply a domestic cleansing process?

tim (living in wonder)
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 04:40 AM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
12,650 Posts
Tim

As explained on here it means that two different things are in fact similar enough to make the difference relatively unimportant.

Translated into footie-player-speak

"six of one and 'alf a dozen of the other" or "six and two threes"

would seem to come fairly close to the mark.

I believe the first time I'd seen it was in the discussion of ChrisE's dad's Super Scorpio in the Open Discussion- where there was an explanation given.

Going flying today?

It's awash here but hoping it will clear up later on

cheers

Leccy
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 09:33 AM
Enjoy Life B4U Die!
Buzz_Man's Avatar
United States, GA, Powder Springs
Joined Dec 1999
4,258 Posts
One of my peeves is the term moot - originally used to describe a point worthy of argument or debate. Now, this term is used frequently as the opposite meaning.

I also don't understand how school teachers in the UK can sleep at night "Okay, kiddies, pronounce the wuud (word) bum-pah (bumper). Ollll right (all right), now say the wuuud (word) crack-ah (cracker)". How can they DO this? It's SO WRONG!!!!

Drives me crazy to hear those folks ruin the language.

So, what if they did create it - we perfected it, and I think there should be an international movemet to have everyone speak the lnguage properly.
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 10:12 AM
Most Exalted Windbag
Newark, DE USA
Joined May 2001
1,632 Posts
Originally posted by Buzz_Man
One of my peeves is the term moot - originally used to describe a point worthy of argument or debate. Now, this term is used frequently as the opposite meaning.


Dang Buzz, I've always been one of those people and I thought I was good at English. Kind of late in life to learn it, but what the heck.
Thanks!

RB
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 11:13 AM
Visitor from Reality
United States, VA, Arlington
Joined Dec 1996
12,788 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by Buzz_Man


So, what if they did create it - we perfected it, and I think there should be an international movemet to have everyone speak the lnguage properly.
And, perhaps, take the time to spell correctly too?
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 12:25 PM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
12,650 Posts
Interesting point that you mooted there Buzz - though both the usage you refer to and the one you decry appear to be acceptable

http://www.allwords.com/query.php?Se...SP=1&v=6966359


Where I come from the children in school are quite likely to pronounce that "werd" as "crakk-err" and there are huge regional variations in dialect and pronunciation in a very small island. Professor Higgins wasn't joking when he said he could tell the street a man was born and brought up in from his accent.

So I'm saying that there is almost as much variation in language over here than between here and there. Do we say things differently from you?

To lapse into my native dialect

"Doo de doo dat?"
Dee doo doh, don't dee doh?

cheers

Leccy
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 01:14 PM
Most Exalted Windbag
Newark, DE USA
Joined May 2001
1,632 Posts
leccy said,
Interesting point that you mooted there Buzz - though both the usage you refer to and the one you decry appear to be acceptable


Whew! Saved by a better dictionary.

RB
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 02:33 PM
Grizzled Member
Jim Robinson's Avatar
Bonners Ferry, Idaho USA
Joined Mar 2001
267 Posts
The one that gets me is<a target="_blank" href="http://www.allwords.com/query.php?SearchType=3&Keyword=myriad&goquery=Find +it%21&Language=ENG&NLD=1&FRA=1&DEU=1&ITA=1&ESP=1& v=82927922">&quot;myriad&quot;</a>. I can't stand it when someone says "The myriad posts in Off Topic Discussion make for interesting reading" for example, although according to several dictionaries that I've checked, that is the correct usage of the word.<p>To me, there should be an "of" in there; "The myriad <b>of</b> posts in Off Topic Discussion make for interesting reading". I guess it's a "moot" ( ) point, but somehow it just makes me cringe.

That's my opinion, thank you...

Jim
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 03:07 PM
Single-task at best...
tim hooper's Avatar
Telford, UK
Joined Feb 2000
7,501 Posts
Some common forms of linguistic murder;

Skelington (skeleton), excape (escape), lacksydaisy (lackadaisical), pacific (specific), hisself (himself), theirselves (themselves).

A very common one here in the West Midlands is substituting the word 'her' for 'she', and then dropping the aitch, thus;

" 'er's bin to the shops, 'er 'as!

" Oo 'as?"

" Our wench 'as, that's oo! And another thing; the bitch 'as 'ad whelps....."

To render the last exchange into the Brummie/Black Country/West Midlands dialect in print is beyond me.

Mrs H. is from a large & hospitable Brummie family, featuring the large & hospitable sister Rosa. One of our early exchanges went like this;

"Guess what, our Tim? I'm savin' up!"

"Really Rosa? What are you saving for?"

"I'm 'aving me back passage done!"

"Pardon me?"

"Yus, I'm 'avin' it turned into a utility room, so I can keep the washin' machine in there...."

tim

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Old Oct 14, 2001, 05:01 PM
Enjoy Life B4U Die!
Buzz_Man's Avatar
United States, GA, Powder Springs
Joined Dec 1999
4,258 Posts
http://www.dictionary.com

This site helps me often.

They're going to fly again because it's their desinty to be there (one e-flight R/C pilot to another).

Is there a meaning in that statement?

Anyway, I'm a big fan of the BBC show "My Word", or "My Wuud", as some say it. I don't know the difference between Brittish accents - except they're all wrong, of course.

LL&P!
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Old Oct 14, 2001, 07:10 PM
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CaptQuirk's Avatar
Michigan, USA
Joined Apr 2001
124 Posts
Accents vary regionally almost everywhere. For instance try putting a mountain born New Hampshirite in the same room with a swamp bred Louisiana Cajun. It's hard to believe they are both trying to speak the same language.

True story: After spending a month in Mexico working with 2 Italians, 3 Germans and 1 Japanese, I was sitting in the Mexico City airport waiting for my flight back to the states. A group of people came and sat behind me and started talking. I not only didn't understand what they were saying but I couldn't even decide which language group they were using. Being curious I stood up and looked around only to spot a tag on a carry on bag that read "Melbourne Travel Club", It all fell into place then.

Quirky
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Old Oct 15, 2001, 12:57 AM
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sppeart's Avatar
Bakersfield, CA
Joined Jun 2000
166 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by leccyflyer


Where I come from the children in school are quite likely to pronounce that "werd" as "crakk-err" and there are huge regional variations in dialect and pronunciation in a very small island. Professor Higgins wasn't joking when he said he could tell the street a man was born and brought up in from his accent.

cheers

Leccy

How true. When I hear, for example, Tony Blair speaking, I think: sophisticated, regal, refined, etc. (dialect, not subject matter ). Then I hear Tracey Ullman speak, and I think almost the opposite. They both have very (to my American ears) british accents, but they really sound entirely different.

By the way - when you brits hear us Americans speaking, does it sound wrong or sloppy ? I always suspected that it might. Just curious.

Stephen
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Old Oct 15, 2001, 02:43 AM
All under control, Grommit!
leccyflyer's Avatar
United Kingdom, Aberdeen
Joined Sep 2000
12,650 Posts
Stephen

I just love this stuff. Though as a Liverpudlian my views on accents and language might not be universally accepted in the UK, my feeling is that the more diversity there is the merrier. To me vernacular speech is so much more descriptive than poorly used Standard English. THe BBC get quite a lot of irate letters complaining about pronunciation and deploring regional accents becoming increasingly common in broadcasting but I would applaud that happening.

To answer your question, to me the American accent and use of the language doesn't sound sloppy at all, just different. For me the main thing is that it usually sounds very slow. There must be regional US accents that are characterised by rapid talkers but most of those that I hear are slow and the southern and western ones tend to be a drawl with lots of long sounds. Usually very laid back. I really liked the thread that Larry SR put up after one of your big shows with some ezoners audio clips- I sat upright and thought WOW those chaps are even speaking American as well! We are so used to American accents from the TV and films that they are not as strange as they might have been at one time.

Reading about the influx of American GIs in 1942-43 to this area one of the points was that their manners and accents were completely foreign to the local population - I guess talkies had only been going about fifteen years at that time and there was no TV. A lot of that unfamiliarity has gone now and we would consider the accent in the same sort of way as an Aussie accent - English but containing a lot of idiosyncracies.

There is a tremendous amount of cross fertilisation in the language- I know we read the "you guys say fags for cigarettes and make sure you don't ask for a rubber if you make a mistake drawing up your plan" sort of posts and very amusing they are too. Really though, the language is very fluid and readily incorporates ideas and phrases from other places, whether they originate in English speaking countries or are incorporated from other languages. This adds a certain "Je ne sais quoi" to the language. I don't know what it is, but it's there .

I also remember the first time I heard a real strong southern US accent over here from a colleague who worked for Amoco. I was completely gobsmacked- it was exactly like having a conversation with Phones (Troy Tempest's sidekick from the Stingray puppet show) - mind you, he probably thought it was like having a conversation with Ringo and we got on like a house on fire.

cheers

Brian
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Old Oct 15, 2001, 04:10 AM
Useful Idiot
Asturias, Spain
Joined Mar 2001
3,546 Posts
American accents just sound that. To other Americans, they may sound, Mid-west, New England or Deep South. The same on this side of the pond. I'm sure Leccy can easily distinguish a Manchester, (20 miles down the road from Liverpool) accent and Tim a Wolverhampton one, similarly close to Telford and to both of them I'd sound a *!* southerner.
Elegant or refined (posh) is best typified by eg Prince Chaaaarles, the last person alive to say things like "One thinks that the pleb to whom one spoke.." Politicians, shame to say, all sound the same nowadays. There was a time when their party was obvious as soon as they opened their mouth.
Bad English can only be the one that most people find hard to understand. Vive la difference!
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Old Oct 15, 2001, 04:31 AM
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Moogee's Avatar
United Kingdom, Scotland, Edinburgh
Joined May 2000
521 Posts
Here comes a generalisation...

The thing I find most intriguing about all the regional and such variations of the English language is the inability of a lot of non UK folk to be able to understand a 'different' dialect to their native one.

E.g. Some friends of mine went to Florida, walked into a Mazda main dealership and asked if they could test drive the "Mazdah" out front.
"Excuse me?"
"That maroon Mazdah"
"Excuse me?"
"That Mazdah there (points)"
"Oh, the Meeazdah? (gets the keys)"

Stunning.
Oh, and try ordering a Big Mac in Orlando with an English accent.
Good luck.

Morgan
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